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HBC READATHONS 2018 - ON HOLD > READATHON - BREAK THREE - AUGUST 22ND

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Hello All,

This is one that we have done before but is very interesting. Post an image, painting, sculpture, picture, photograph, drawing, etc - (you get the point) which visually represents your book, anybody featured in the book, location of the book, anything at all that would be interesting. There are many great works which depict biographical and autobiographical images of famous personages, places, events, etc.



message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Aug 22, 2015 10:41AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Plato:





I have used this as the masthead and avatar for the group - I change these very frequently.

The painting is called The School of Athens by the famous Italian Renaissance artist Raphael and decorates the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican and it one of the iconic representations of Philosophy there are. Plato is supposed to be in the center with his student Aristotle to his left. Plato holds Timaeus, Aristotle his Nicomachean Ethics

The School of Athens, or Scuola di Atene in Italian, is one of the most famous frescoes by the Italian Renaissance artist Raphael. It was painted between 1509 and 1511 as a part of Raphael's commission to decorate the rooms now known as the Stanze di Raffaello, in the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican. The Stanza della Segnatura was the first of the rooms to be decorated, and The School of Athens, representing Philosophy, was probably the second painting to be finished there, after La Disputa (Theology) on the opposite wall, and the Parnassus (Literature). The picture has long been seen as "Raphael's masterpiece and the perfect embodiment of the classical spirit of the Renaissance.

More:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sch...





1: Zeno of Citium 2: Epicurus Possibly, the image of two philosophers, who were typically shown in pairs during the Renaissance: Heraclitus, the "weeping" philosopher, and Democritus, the "laughing" philosopher. 3: unknown (believed to be Raphael)[14] 4: Boethius or Anaximander or Empedocles? 5: Averroes 6: Pythagoras 7: Alcibiades or Alexander the Great? 8: Antisthenes or Xenophon or Timon? 9: Raphael,[14][15][16] Fornarina as a personification of Love[17] or Francesco Maria della Rovere? 10: Aeschines or Xenophon? 11: Parmenides? (Leonardo da Vinci) 12: Socrates 13: Heraclitus (Michelangelo) 14: Plato (Leonardo da Vinci) 15: Aristotle (Giuliano da Sangallo) 16: Diogenes of Sinope 17: Plotinus (Donatello?) 18: Euclid or Archimedes with students (Bramante?) 19: Strabo or Zoroaster? (Baldassare Castiglione) 20: Ptolemy? R: Apelles (Raphael) 21: Protogenes (Il Sodoma, Perugino, or Timoteo Viti)

I am reading The Republic by Plato.

The Republic by Plato by Plato Plato


message 3: by Teri (last edited Aug 22, 2015 10:40AM) (new)

Teri (teriboop) I'm reading about the Galveston hurricane of 1900. Here is a split picture of Galveston with 1900 after the hurricane on the left and a picture of Galveston today on the right.


(Source: PBS)

Isaac's Storm A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History by Erik Larson by Erik Larson Erik Larson


message 4: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana)
British Magistrate, British Raj, Antique Lithograph

Source: www.collectorsprints.com

Reading Shadow of the moon by M.M. Kaye

Shadow of the Moon by M.M. Kaye by M.M. Kaye M.M. Kaye


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Wow looks like Sandy.


message 6: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) Wow, Teri. Great photo!


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
What a wonderful lithograph Samanta.


message 8: by Samanta (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) I think it shows the spirit of the period with great accuracy.


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Samanta wrote: "I think it shows the spirit of the period with great accuracy." I'm afraid it does.


message 10: by Doris (new)

Doris (webgeekstress) | 143 comments My second readathon book, For the Thrill of It, about the Leopold and Loeb kidnapping & murder, was a partial inspiration for Hitchcock's 1948 movie, Rope.

Rope also has the cinematic distinctions of taking place in real time and of having been edited to appear to be one looooong shot.
For the Thrill of It by Simon Baatz , by Simon Baatz (no photo)


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
That is very interesting Doris - thank you - I did not know that.


message 12: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3819 comments Mod
Here's a picture of Foucault's Pendulum in the Pantheon in Paris.



This Wikipedia entry has more diagrams and formulas.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foucaul...


message 13: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
That is stupendous. Thanks Vicki


message 14: by Kristen (last edited Aug 22, 2015 03:26PM) (new)

Kristen | 66 comments A 1936 photo of Pope Pius XI, then Cardinal Ratti, and Benito Mussolini in 1943:




Pope and Mussolini




A very curious "partnership" between these two.
I am reading:

The Pope and Mussolini The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe by David I. Kertzer byDavid I. Kertzer (no photo)


message 15: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Aug 22, 2015 03:28PM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Gee Mussolini looks more friendly and that is not saying much. The pope looks very very serious.

I think that book is going to be a fascinating book. I wonder if it is a balanced portrayal and how the parties feel about this rendition. Catholic Church, Italy, the Italian people, historians, World I and World War II buffs?

Great thanks


message 16: by Kristen (new)

Kristen | 66 comments Got it, fixed.


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