The Readers Review: Literature from 1714 to 1910 discussion

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2014/15 Group Reads - Archives > A Harlot High and Low - Reading Schedule

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message 1: by Deborah, Moderator (last edited Aug 17, 2015 10:37AM) (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
This book has no chapter numbers, but does have chapter headings. In addition, many chapters are only a page or two long. My reading schedule reflects the beginning and ending chapter for the week by title. I'm not going to list the chapters in between as this post would become cumbersome.

September 1 - Part One - A View of the Open Hall through Moneybags in Despair (pg 17 thru 88)

September 8 - Part One - An Abyss Beneath Esther's Happiness through Mock Priest, Fake Bills, Bad Debts, Feigned Love (end of Part One) (pg 88 thru 162)

September 15 - Part Two - A Hundred Thousand Francs Invested in Asia through The Sort of Music Old Men Sometimes Hear at the Italians (pg 165 thru 242)

September 22 - Part Two - Trouble on the Threshold through Part Three - How the Two Prisoners Take their Misfortune (pg. 243 thru 321)

September 29 - Part Three - The Examining Magistrate is Worried through In Which the Dandy and the Poet are Reunited (pg. 323 thru 400)

October 6 - Part Three - The Difficulty in Committing Suicide in Prison through Part Four - A Singular Criminal Trial (pg. 400 thru 470)

October 13 - Part Four - Charlie through Disappointment (pg. 470 thru 539)

October 20 - Part Four - In Which Jacques Collins Abdicates as Deb through conclusion. (pg. 540 thru end)

Please feel free to let me know if this works for you.


message 2: by Omaid (new)

Omaid ibn Naimet Deeply regretting that I chose this book. :( I'm depending on ebooks. and the ones there are on the Internet don't even have chapter names, let aside chapter numbers.


message 3: by Deborah, Moderator (last edited Aug 17, 2015 10:35AM) (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Omaid wrote: "Deeply regretting that I chose this book. :( I'm depending on ebooks. and the ones there are on the Internet don't even have chapter names, let aside chapter numbers."

I can give you approximate page numbers. You should be aware that I'm using the Penguin Classic paperback. I have edited the original post to reflect pages.


message 4: by Linda (new)

Linda | 230 comments Thanks Deborah, the schedule looks great! Just waiting for my book to arrive now.

I think there is a small error on the schedule, though. I believe the last week should be Oct 20th and not Oct 27th, unless we are skipping a week for some reason?


message 5: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Linda wrote: "Thanks Deborah, the schedule looks great! Just waiting for my book to arrive now.

I think there is a small error on the schedule, though. I believe the last week should be Oct 20th and not Oct 2..."


Thanks Linda. I've corrected it. I labeled one section twice in my notes. Because of my book not having a table of contents it took a lot of detail work to be able to come up with a schedule. My eyes must have been crossed ;-)


message 6: by Omaid (new)

Omaid ibn Naimet That's the problem. The version is of james waring. not penguin classic's. Gutenberg has this version.


message 7: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Omaid wrote: "That's the problem. The version is of james waring. not penguin classic's. Gutenberg has this version."

I'm not sure what to tell you. I already purchased the book, and I can't come up with a creative solution for us. Can you think of something that might help? I don't read by computer. The weight of the laptop or iPad is too much for my wrist (I damaged it years ago).


message 8: by Omaid (new)

Omaid ibn Naimet It will take require some work from you. The translation are different. But as the meaning is same you can tally the starting and ending point of chapter. no need to mark each chapter, only those Which are the starting and ending ones of each part. hope you're getting it?


message 9: by Omaid (new)

Omaid ibn Naimet download the gutenberg version and see If it works :)


message 10: by Linda (last edited Aug 17, 2015 11:27AM) (new)

Linda | 230 comments Omaid, if Deborah or someone else posts the starting page number for each week from the Penguin edition, then you can figure out the percentage of the book that that corresponds to. Can you find the start of each week that way?

Or, when I get my book I can post the starting line or two of each week (instead of the chapter heading). When I looked at the difference between the translations, they were often close enough that I think you can easily search for phrases.


message 11: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Omaid wrote: "download the gutenberg version and see If it works :)"

I moderate in several groups, and creating the reading schedule literally took me at least 3 hours. Unfortunately, I don't have the time to compare multiple versions of the book. I suggest you use the pages above as a guideline and know there might be some differences. There are going to be differences in translation anyway.


message 12: by Linda (new)

Linda | 230 comments Deborah wrote: "Thanks Linda. I've corrected it. I labeled one section twice in my notes. Because of my book not having a table of contents it took a lot of detail work to be able to come up with a schedule. My eyes must have been crossed ;-)"

Thanks again, Deborah. And for including the page numbers, I appreciate it. I can imagine that was a lot of work! Now to print it out to use as my bookmark. :)


message 13: by Omaid (new)

Omaid ibn Naimet @linda, yes that is what I was saying. That will hopefully help.


message 14: by Omaid (new)

Omaid ibn Naimet it's okay deborah, I appreciate your hardwork.


message 15: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Omaid wrote: "it's okay deborah, I appreciate your hardwork."

Thanks guys. I wish I had more time to do more :). It was challenging with no table on contents so I had to go page by page to find chapters.


message 16: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Since a lot of people are using the Gutenberg or Kindle versions for this read, if it is not too much work, a suggestion. In my classes, many students get eBooks that don't correspond. So what I do is tell them the last line for the chapters they have to read for the week. Once they read that line, they know to stop. They can even do a search for that line right away so they know the page number/percentage on their own digitial device.


message 17: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Lynnm wrote: "Since a lot of people are using the Gutenberg or Kindle versions for this read, if it is not too much work, a suggestion. In my classes, many students get eBooks that don't correspond. So what I do..."

I can post the last line when I post the thread for each week. That's very doable. Thanks for the suggestion


message 18: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Glad to be able to help. :-)


message 19: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Deborah wrote: " Unfortunately, I don't have the time to compare multiple versions of the book. I suggest you use the pages above as a guideline and know there might be some differences."

Given the complications of a non-table-of-contents ebook, that probably makes the most sense, but it means you may have to be a bit lenient about inadvertent spoilers if somebody guessed wrong about where a section ends.

The other option is when you open each week's discussion section for you to identify a major plot element which marks the end of the week's section. I haven't started it, so I have no idea what those might be, but that might not be too much work for you if you're reading to (or ahead of) the schedule. Or maybe somebody else who has the Penguin version would take over that task? (I'm reading the Gutenberg edition so can't help.)


message 20: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Lynnm wrote: " So what I do is tell them the last line for the chapters they have to read for the week. "

That would work if we were all reading the same translation, but it might not be so easy to recognize the exact line in a different translation!


message 21: by Deborah, Moderator (last edited Aug 18, 2015 04:53AM) (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Everyman wrote: "Deborah wrote: " Unfortunately, I don't have the time to compare multiple versions of the book. I suggest you use the pages above as a guideline and know there might be some differences."

Given th..."


I think the last sentence will work. It may not be identical but should be close or if the predominate number of people reading the e-version, one reading that version could lead the discussion.


message 22: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments And a few of the people reading the ebooks can provide the exact sentences if others are having issues....


message 23: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
I'm looking for a volunteer to lead this discussion. Person must be using an e version of book


message 24: by Ami (new)

Ami | 153 comments Deborah wrote: "I'm looking for a volunteer to lead this discussion. Person must be using an e version of book"


How about another poll, Deborah, for those who are committing to read...Whether we're using an e-copy vs a tree copy and take it from there before another discussion leader needs to step up? Lynnm makes a good point in message 22...The e-book readers will be able to help one another out if further clarification is needed?


message 25: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Ami wrote: "Deborah wrote: "I'm looking for a volunteer to lead this discussion. Person must be using an e version of book"


How about another poll, Deborah, for those who are committing to read...Whether we'..."


I believe between the chapter headings, the page numbers, and the last sentence should be sufficient for anybody to find their way. We've read books before just by page numbers and things had to be approximated. I think that's what would go on here. I suggested another leader because it seemed some of the e-book people were not comfortable. If nobody steps up, I will lead and the group will have to make do with the chapter headings, page number, and last sentences.


message 26: by Robin P, Moderator (new)

Robin P | 2201 comments Mod
My page numbers won't help you,since I have it in French as part of ebook of Complete Works, but I have chapter numbers as follows, if that helps anyone

September 1 - Part One - A View of the Open Hall through Moneybags in Despair (pg 17 thru 88) Chapter 1 thru 17

September 8 - Part One - An Abyss Beneath Esther's Happiness through Mock Priest, Fake Bills, Bad Debts, Feigned Love (end of Part One) (pg 88 thru 162) Chapter 18-31

September 15 - Part Two - A Hundred Thousand Francs Invested in Asia through The Sort of Music Old Men Sometimes Hear at the Italians (pg 165 thru 242) Chapter 1-14

September 22 - Part Two - Trouble on the Threshold through Part Three - How the Two Prisoners Take their Misfortune (pg. 243 thru 321) Chapter 15-26 in Part Two & 1-10 in Part Three

September 29 - Part Three - The Examining Magistrate is Worried through In Which the Dandy and the Poet are Reunited (pg. 323 thru 400) Chapter 11-Chapter 51

October 6 - Part Three - The Difficulty in Committing Suicide in Prison through Part Four - A Singular Criminal Trial (pg. 400 thru 470) Chapter 52 -55 in Part Three & 1-13 in Part Four

October 13 - Part Four - Charlie through Disappointment (pg. 470 thru 539) - Chapter 1-36

October 20 - Part Four - In Which Jacques Collins Abdicates as Deb through conclusion. (pg. 540 thru end) Chapter 37-41 + Conclusion


message 27: by Wendel (last edited Aug 20, 2015 04:44PM) (new)

Wendel (wendelman) | 229 comments I added a ToC to the Gutenberg edition, splitting each of the four parts roughly in half, while trying not to do so in the middle of a dialogue. I hope this comes close to Deborah's division in 8 weekly parts.

Download link for EPUB format: Scenes from a Courtesan's Life Epub

Download link for AZW3 format: Scenes from a Courtesan's Life Kindle

NB: in my Kindle for Mac app I see the level2 splits within the four parts only by using Go--->Contents.


message 28: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Wendel wrote: "I added a ToC to the Gutenberg edition, splitting each of the four parts roughly in half, while trying not to do so in the middle of a dialogue. I hope this comes close to Deborah's division in 8 w..."

Thanks for trying :). I'm afraid it won't be accurate because I know there are several weeks where we read sections of two different parts in the same week.


message 29: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments I am trying to read the book, but so far it has completely failed to speak to my condition and I haven't gotten very far (and have little to show for what I have read). I will be very interested to see what others are making of it once the substantive discussion starts.


message 30: by Casceil (new)

Casceil | 220 comments I have read a few pages, but I seem to fall asleep every time I try to read it.


message 31: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Everyman wrote: "I am trying to read the book, but so far it has completely failed to speak to my condition and I haven't gotten very far (and have little to show for what I have read). I will be very interested t..."

I haven't started it yet as I'm leading a discussion in another group. I will be starting it within the next day or so


message 32: by Linda (new)

Linda | 230 comments I've gotten only so far as printing out the schedule to use as my bookmark, I will start reading over the weekend.


message 33: by Robin P, Moderator (new)

Robin P | 2201 comments Mod
I've started and recognized a couple of characters from earlier books. I'm not sure how important is it to know their back stories. Lucien who was Chardon and has now taken on a noble name, was the hero of Illusions Perdues and Eugene de Rastignac was the hero of Pere Goriot. I think many of the other characters are in previous books as well. I didn't realize that, like Zola, Balzac continues with certain characters from book to book. For instance Lucien is now the social equal of people who looked down on him before. Not knowing anyone makes it harder to jump in, I think.


message 34: by Rose (new)

Rose Rocha dos Santos (roserocha) | 42 comments Robin wrote: "My page numbers won't help you,since I have it in French as part of ebook of Complete Works, but I have chapter numbers as follows, if that helps anyone

September 1 - Part One - A View of the Ope..."


Hey, Robin! Nice to meet you!

I have a version in French too... Did you buy it at Amazon? Mine is "Honoré de Balzac : Oeuvres complètes et annexes - 115 titres La Comédie humaine (Nouvelle édition enrichie) - Arvensa Editions (French Edition)"...

What is your version?


message 35: by Ami (last edited Aug 29, 2015 01:25PM) (new)

Ami | 153 comments Robin wrote: "I've started and recognized a couple of characters from earlier books. I'm not sure how important is it to know their back stories. Lucien who was Chardon and has now taken on a noble name, was the..."

It is, I fancy, generally known that characters from one Balzac novel are likely to reappear in others. The editor of the Classiques Garnier edition lists forty-four characters in the present volume who may also be found elsewhere. Many of them are quite 'unimportant' to the action, while the juvenile lead, Lucien Chardon, dit de Rubempré, has been met with only once before...

The other novel which he is the hero is Illusions perdues, and to that novel this one may, to that extent, be considered a sequel, though within the large framework of Balzac's Comédie humaine the earlier novel is classed as one of the 'Scenes of Parisian Life,' a somewhat arbitrary distinction, since much of the action of Ilusions perdues takes place in Paris...

About forty-three characters in this book, other than Lucien, who occur elsewhere, the reader who wants to follow them up could do much worse than consult Félicien Marceau's book, Balzac and his World... But knowledge of all these ramifications can add only marginally to any reader's enjoyment of the present volume.


Rayner Heppenstall (Penguin Classics Introduction page V & VII)

P.S. If any of you are reading this edition, like me, don't make the mistake of reading the introduction like I did...There are spoilers. :P


message 36: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Robin wrote: "I've started and recognized a couple of characters from earlier books. I'm not sure how important is it to know their back stories. Lucien who was Chardon and has now taken on a noble name, was the..."

I'm having that difficulty of not knowing anybody. Yes, the book is a sequel.


message 37: by Robin P, Moderator (last edited Aug 29, 2015 03:25PM) (new)

Robin P | 2201 comments Mod
Rose wrote: "Robin wrote: "My page numbers won't help you,since I have it in French as part of ebook of Complete Works, but I have chapter numbers as follows, if that helps anyone

September 1 - Part One - A V..."


Hi Rose, I bought the Oeuvres Completes from iTunes/iBooks for 1.99 or 2.99. (something like 30,000 pages!) It is the Arvensa edition so I think it is the same. Are you a native French speaker? I am not, but studied French in college and grad school.

I did the same with Zola awhile ago, purchasing complete works for practically nothing (and no shelf space required, I don't even have to feel guilty!). You can download a lot of ndividual classics for free (in multiple languages) on the app Megareader for iPad or IPhone but they don't have all the works, mainly the most widely read ones.

I was going to mention that you can look up the characters online to see some of their history but I also ran into spoilers for this book while doing that so I don't recommend it!


message 38: by Rose (new)

Rose Rocha dos Santos (roserocha) | 42 comments Robin wrote: "Rose wrote: "Robin wrote: "My page numbers won't help you,since I have it in French as part of ebook of Complete Works, but I have chapter numbers as follows, if that helps anyone

September 1 - P..."


Ah! Yes, it must be the same edition! I am going to use your reading schedule, then! :)

Well, I am brazilian and I am a native Portuguese speaker, actually. But I studied English and French and I need to read more to improve my vocabulary...

I bought a lot of ebooks too, my house doesn't have space for books anymore... lol

Well, I am glad I joined this group, you all seem to be really cool and helpful!

Thank you, guys!


message 39: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments So is it better to read Lost Illusions first, and then read this book? Depending on how long Lost Illusions is, I might whip through that first, and then move to this one.


message 40: by Ami (last edited Aug 29, 2015 06:42PM) (new)

Ami | 153 comments Lynnm wrote: "So is it better to read Lost Illusions first, and then read this book? Depending on how long Lost Illusions is, I might whip through that first, and then move to this one."

Doesn't seem like it to me according to the introduction in my edition Lynnm. There is a brief synopsis for where "LI" ends and where "AHHaL" begins... Would you like for me to post it?


message 41: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Ami - if it isn't too much work, that would be wonderful!


message 42: by Ami (last edited Aug 29, 2015 06:49PM) (new)

Ami | 153 comments Lynnm wrote: "Ami - if it isn't too much work, that would be wonderful!"

"...since much of the action of Illusions perdues takes place in Paris."

In it, we find Lucien Chardon, a young man of modest origins but with some claim to nobility (and to the name 'de Rubempré) on his mother's side, a poet and vain of his looks and determined to put them to use, in the souther town of Angoulême. Taken up by a local grande dame, he goes to Paris, sets foot in the literary world but sinks to the lowest depths of journalism, leaves his protectress and becomes the lover of a woman of the town, Coralie, who dies, and returns to the provinces, not merely dejected but shamed by a piece of financial trickery which has got his amiable brother-in-law into trouble.

Towards the end of the book, he sets off one morning to drown himself in the Charente, but meets a Spanish priest on a diplomatic mission, who at once takes a fancy to the young man and promises him a great future. Lucien gets into the priest's carriage, and they drive on towards Paris, Lucien's sister presently receiving a letter from him which encloses money and says that she mustn't worry. Lucien is all right, though he feels somewhat enslaved.

The date at the end of Illusions perdues is the late summer or early autumn of 1823. The present novel begins early the next year.


Heppenstall Introduction, page VI


message 43: by Lynnm (last edited Aug 29, 2015 06:48PM) (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Thank you, Ami!!!!! :-)

(It sounds good - eventually, I'll have to go back and read it).


message 44: by Ami (last edited Aug 29, 2015 08:07PM) (new)

Ami | 153 comments This is how the "Yahoo Balzac Group" took on reading the entire Human Comedy.
A major influence to the reading order suggested is the book Balzac as He Should Be Read by William Hobart Royce. Royce’s order is mostly historically chronological, and changes have been made in the early readings to at first introduce the reader to one of Balzac’s best works (Father Goriot) and then read a selection of historically early works before tackling some of the lesser, earliest stories which are not necessarily Balzac’s best work.

Father Goriot
The Chouans
An Episode Under the Terror
The Vendetta
The Conscript/The Recruit
The Red Inn
The Maranas/Juana
A Passion in the Desert
The Exiles
Christ in Flanders
Maitre Cornelius
A Second Home/A Double Family/Double Life
The Gondreville Mystery/An Historical Mystery/A Shady Business/Murky Business/A Dark Affair
At the Sign of the Cat and Racket/The House of the Tennis-playing Cat/Fame and Sorrow
The Executioner
Domestic Peace/The Peace of the Home
Louis Lambert
The Quest of the Absolute/The Alkahest
A Woman of Thirty
The Thirteen: The Girl with the Golden Eyes
A Bachelor’s Establishment/The Two Brothers/The Black Sheep
The Elixir of Life
About Catherine de’ Medici: Preface/Introduction
About Catherine de’ Medici:The Calvinist Martyr
Eugenie Grandet
About Catherine de’ Medici: The Ruggieri’s Secret
About Catherine de’ Medici: The Two Dreams
The Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau
The Unknown Masterpiece/The Hidden Masterpiece
Sarrasine
The Hated Son
Adieu/Farewell
The Thirteen: Ferragus
The Message
Colonel Chabert
Facino Cane
Lost Illusions: The Two Poets
Lost Illusions: A Distinguished Provincial at Paris/A Great Man of the Provinces in Paris
Lost Illusions: Eve and David/ The Trials of the Inventor

La Grenadiere
Massimilla Doni
The Lily of the Valley
Melmoth Reconciled
The Atheist’s Mass
The Jealousies of a Country Town: The Old Maid
The Jealousies of a Country Town: The Cabinet of Antiquities
A Seaside Tragedy/A Drama on the Seashore
The Thirteen: The Duhesse of Langeais
Madame Firmiani
The Peasantry/Sons of the Soil
Scenes from a Courtesan’s Life: Esther Happy/How Girls Love
Scenes from a Courtesan’s Life: What Love Costs an Old Man
Scenes from a Courtesan’s Life: The End of Evil Ways
Scenes from a Courtesan’s Life: Vautrin’s Last Avatar/The Last Incarnation of Vautrin

Modeste Mignon
The Purse
The Ball at Sceaux
A Marriage Settlement/A Marriage Contract
Gobseck
The Deserted Woman
A Study of Woman
The Commission in Lunacy/The Interdiction
A Start in Life
The Vicar of Tours
The Country Doctor
Another Study of Woman
La Grande Breteche
Letters of Two Brides/Memoirs of Two Young Married Women
Pierrette
Pierre Grassou
The Government Clerks/Bureaucracy
The Magic Skin/Wild Ass’s Skin
Parisians in the Country: Gaudissart the Great/The Illustrious Gaudissart
A Man of Business
A Daughter of Eve
Ursula
The Secrets of a Princess/The Secrets of the Princess Cadignan
Honorine
Albert Savarus
Gambara
The Firm of Nucingen/The House of Nucingen/Nucingen & Co, Bankers
The Seamy Side of History/The Brotherhood of Consolation: Madame de la Chanterie
The Seamy Side of History/The Brotherhood of Consolation: The Initiate
The Imaginary Mistress/Paz/The False Mistress
A Prince of Bohemia
Beatrix
Z. Marcas
The Muse of the Department
The Country Parson/The Village Rector/Poor Relations
Poor Relations: Cousin Betty
Poor Relations: Cousin Pons
The Middle Classes/The Lesser Bourgeoise
Gaudissart II
The Member for Arcis/The Deputy for Arcis
The Unconscious Humorists/The Unconscious Comedians
The Physiology of Marriage
Petty Troubles of Married Life
Seraphita


~A list of all the characters found in the Comedie Humaine and the stories they appear in


message 45: by Ami (new)

Ami | 153 comments Lynnm wrote: "Thank you, Ami!!!!! :-)

(It sounds good - eventually, I'll have to go back and read it)."


You're welcome, Lynnm :)


message 46: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Lynnm wrote: "So is it better to read Lost Illusions first, and then read this book? Depending on how long Lost Illusions is, I might whip through that first, and then move to this one."

It is considered a sequel Lynn. I read the intro and then started the book and find myself very confused


message 47: by Casceil (new)

Casceil | 220 comments I started reading the Penguin Classics edition and found it very confusing. I looked around for other translations. I found one that is much easier to read and follow. I found it on Amazon, with the title Splendors and Miseries of Courtesans, Annotated with short biography. I bought it for Kindle for $4.29. This edition does not seem to have a goodreads link. It's not perfect. There are some formatting issues and no easy way to cross-reference between annotations and text, but I am finding it much easier to understand than the Penguin edition.


message 48: by Teanka (new)

Teanka | 9 comments Ami wrote: "This is how the "Yahoo Balzac Group" took on reading the entire Human Comedy.
A major influence to the reading order suggested is the book Balzac as He Should Be Read by William Hobart Royce. Royce..."


This is a very nice list, Ami. Only the place of Father Goriot is totally wrong, it should come a little before The Lost Ilusions. Probably comes first on the list because it's Balzac's most famous novels. Chronologically the first are The Chouans, together with An Episode Under the Terror, which is but a novella.

Lost Illusions are in fact composed of 3 novels and are quite long.
I think no matter where you enter the world of Human Comedy, you will encounter characters that you know nothing about. Actually, that's what I liked the most - all characters come with a back story, just as people you meet in real life. For instance, the first book I read was Lost Illusions and I think it's a good start, but later I read Father Goriot and realised that I should have read it earlier. And so on, later I read Cesar Birotteau that takes place about 20 years earlier. I don't think you should worry too much about the order.


message 49: by Bonnie (new)

Bonnie | 228 comments I just figured out that
Scenes from a Courtesan's Life and
The Splendors and Miseries of Courtesans
are the same thing as
A Harlot High and Low

Good to know!


message 50: by Louise (new)

Louise | 46 comments Are you planning to read more Balzac later? I'd love to participate :-)


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