Ask Suzanne Rindell - Thursday, March 6th! discussion

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Featured Author Chat 2014 > Ask Suzanne!

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message 1: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Shannon  (cincindypat) Welcome to the group! Suzanne will be answering questions throughout the day on Thursday, March 6th in this thread only. In the meantime if you have a question for Isabel or just want to introduce yourself feel free to do so in this thread.


Lorrea - WhatChaReadin'? (whatchatreadin) I received a copy of The Other Typist from the publisher as a first read! I enjoyed it so much. My question for Suzanne is, what made you decide to write about that era?


message 3: by Mayda (last edited Feb 28, 2014 06:50AM) (new)

Mayda Bosco | 3 comments Greetings. The historical events that occur in NYC during the same time period as "The Other Typist” seem to be represented in the margins so to speak. Speakeasies during Prohibition and cronyism & corruption are certainly front and center. But other events such as the exploitation of workers in the booming garment industry, organized labor strikes, unionization, a massive immigrant population living in squalor-like conditions, and tense race relations escalating with the performance of Eugene O’Neill’s “All God’s Chillun Got Wings” are hinted at or represented by characters. Would you agree with this assessment? Either way, I thoroughly enjoyed "The Other Typist" and engaged in quite a lively debate discussing its ending. Brilliant. Best, Mayda Bosco


message 4: by Traci (new)

Traci | 1 comments I enjoyed this book very much. It reminded me in some ways of Shirley Jackson's classic "The Haunting of Hill House", with the unreliable narrator and ambiguous ending. Have you read that book, and if so, were you influenced by it?


message 5: by S. (new)

S. Thomas | 1 comments I really liked the book. My question is related to the ambiguous ending referred to in a previous comment.
In unambiguous terms, how would you describe Rose and Odalie?


message 6: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Yes, I would love an explanation of the ending--who is who?


message 7: by Lorraine (new)

Lorraine | 1 comments I also enjoyed the book very much - until I got to the ending. I appreciate an ambiguous or twist ending, but couldn't figure out any scenario that made sense. Will we have to wait for the screen adaptation to find out?


message 8: by Kristy (new)

Kristy | 1 comments I loved loved loved this book and I tell everyone to read it however I cannot process the ending. Frankly I debate it with everyone. What really happened in the end?


message 9: by Marilyn (new)

Marilyn | 1 comments I enjoyed this book on CD. Did you listen to the reading of the book before it was marketed to make certain the reader conveyed "your" ending or do you believe people read/listen with their own voice to a book and therefore aren't influenced by a reading?


message 10: by Elise (new)

Elise Holloway | 2 comments Hi Suzanne, really enjoyed The Other Typist and am looking forward to seeing the screen adaptation - I was wondering how much of a role you will have in its writing/production?


message 11: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (mostlylisa) | 1 comments Hi Suzanne! I really and truly enjoyed reading The Other Typist, it was not something I would have normally read but I am glad I took a chance. I'm also so happy to hear there is going to be a movie adaptation, so exciting! My question for you is what inspired and/or influenced you to write a story like this? Was it the decade in particular or any other type of book?


message 12: by Laona (new)

Laona | 2 comments Hi Suzanne,
I am a librarian and happen to be leading a book discussion group tonight on your book. I know everyone is confused about the ending. I am sure we will have a lively debate, but the main question on everyone's mind will be "What happened at the end? Who is Odalie, who is Rose and how many protagonists are there? One? Two? Three? Thanks!


message 13: by Elise (new)

Elise Holloway | 2 comments Laona wrote: "When will Suzanne be answering the posted questions, or is it just me who can't see any of the answers?"

Thursday, March 6th :)


message 14: by Laona (new)

Laona | 2 comments OK…I was so excited my book group was meeting that I assumed she would be answering questions THIS Thursday! Thanks Elise :)


message 15: by Lili (new)

Lili | 1 comments Loved the book but what I wonder made you choose an ending that has confused everyone including me?


message 16: by Megan (new)

Megan (nutmeg1021) I absolutely loved your book, I thought it was a very strong debut. I have two questions, what are you working on now, and will it be out soon (please say yes!)? Also, as many have stated, the ending for The Other Typist is an ambiguous one, how do you envision the ending in your mind, what do you think happened?


message 17: by Stacey (new)

Stacey | 1 comments I work in a bookstore, and your book was recommended to me by one of my regular customers. Loved it! Just hoping that all the hoopla generated by your book will allow the ambiguity of the ending to remain in place. A book that engenders so much discussion (and a lingering sense of discomfort) is so rare. Thank you!


message 18: by Irene (new)

Irene | 1 comments The Other Typist was one of my top favorite books I read last fall. I have recommended it to all my friends and will be read this spring by my book club! When is your next book? Can't wait to see what you are giving us next! Thanks for such an enjoyable trip!


message 19: by Monica (new)

Monica (monicagalvan) | 2 comments I'm always interested in the process of a favorite writer's book… how did the idea for "The Other Typist" come about? Was it something that unfolded or did you have a set idea in your head from the start? What inspired you before and while writing it?


message 20: by Karen (new)

Karen (kj2983) | 1 comments I loved this book. My question would be whether Rose chose Odalie or Odalie chose Rose (whether or not they are in fact the same person). Which of the background information was true, if any? Keep writing!!!


message 21: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Crain | 2 comments I loved this book! I felt immersed in the time period in which it was set, and I so enjoyed being there. Of course, I, too, was not sure what happened at the end. I would love for Suzanne to tell us, but then I am wondering if the ambiguity is not a vital part of the book?


message 22: by Mayda (new)

Mayda Bosco | 3 comments Hello. Just checking in to ask when this event begins today. At work but want to make sure I don't miss it! Thanks much, Mayda


message 23: by Elizabeth (last edited Mar 06, 2014 07:46AM) (new)

Elizabeth Rocco | 3 comments Hello, Suzannne! My name is Elizabeth, and I found The Other Typist to be an absorbing story.
In your Q&A with Redbook you spoke of the writing process of The Other Typist as a passive process, almost as though you acted as a medium channeling Rose and Odalie to tell their story. Do you feel the same way about the new book you are writing? How different is it writing this second book considering your first book received so much approval?
Thank you.


message 24: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Lorrea(Threein3) wrote: "I received a copy of The Other Typist from the publisher as a first read! I enjoyed it so much. My question for Suzanne is, what made you decide to write about that era?"

Hi there! I got the idea for the book while working on my dissertation, which was supposed to be an academic project focusing on literature & culture of the 1920’s. While doing research, I came upon an obituary of a woman who had worked as a typist in a police precinct during Prohibition, and my imagination took off from there! I started hearing Rose’s narration in my head and decided to write it down. I got a bit derailed from the academic project and found myself working on a creative one instead.


message 25: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Mayda wrote: "Greetings. The historical events that occur in NYC during the same time period as "The Other Typist” seem to be represented in the margins so to speak. Speakeasies during Prohibition and cronyism..."

I would definitely agree with that assessment. As I mention above, I was researching the era for an academic dissertation, so I had all that stuff rattling around my brain as I wrote, and hopefully some of that research got in there without hitting the reader over the head. And I will say: It’s very gratifying when a reader knows their history and recognizes the political and social stakes at play in your novel!


message 26: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Traci wrote: "I enjoyed this book very much. It reminded me in some ways of Shirley Jackson's classic "The Haunting of Hill House", with the unreliable narrator and ambiguous ending. Have you read that book, and..."

I haven’t read “The Haunting of Hill House,” but I certainly will now! I appreciate the rec. Re the ending, I can say I think I’m drawn to endings that make the reader reevaluate his/her perspective. When we read, we make a lot of assumptions, and take for granted what the narration tells us is true, and I’ve always loved books where you get to the end and you want to go back and check for the clues you missed. I love Daphne DuMaurier’s short stories, and what Alfred Hitchcock did with a lot of them when we turned them into movies. And then, Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl was a great recent example of a book that really took readers on a mind-bending ride.


message 27: by Anita (new)

Anita Hi Suzanne, I read The Other Typist last summer with a twitter book club group. We all loved the book and were blown away by it's ending! I'm curious what you're working on now. I'm excited I'll be meeting you on your pb tour when you visit Vero Beach Book Center in April. :)


message 28: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
S. wrote: "I really liked the book. My question is related to the ambiguous ending referred to in a previous comment.
In unambiguous terms, how would you describe Rose and Odalie?"


Hmm. Well, Rose is a person who is defined by her loneliness. She’s a bit emotionally damaged, and sees the world through a distorted perspective. She was interesting to me because she’s doing a job – typing reports in a police precinct -- where we expect someone to practice absolute objectivity. My thinking there was: What could happen? What trouble could she get up to? Odalie is more difficult to describe, because we only see her through Rose’s eyes. As the author, I don’t want to say too much and kill any alternate interpretations readers may have. I will say that I felt there was a real woman who walked into the precinct and caught Rose’s attention, causing Rose to obsess about her. But just how much Rose imagines after that, I won’t say.


message 29: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Debbie wrote: "Yes, I would love an explanation of the ending--who is who?"

Hi Debbie. I don't know if my answer to the previous question helps, but I wrote the following:

Hmm. Well, Rose is a person who is defined by her loneliness. She’s a bit emotionally damaged, and sees the world through a distorted perspective. She was interesting to me because she’s doing a job – typing reports in a police precinct -- where we expect someone to practice absolute objectivity. My thinking there was: What could happen? What trouble could she get up to? Odalie is more difficult to describe, because we only see her through Rose’s eyes. As the author, I don’t want to say too much and kill any alternate interpretations readers may have. I will say that I felt there was a real woman who walked into the precinct and caught Rose’s attention, causing Rose to obsess about her. But just how much Rose imagines after that, I won’t say.


message 30: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Could you PLEASE tell us what actually happened in the end? Or what you think happened? I LOVE strange and eerie endings, but not ambiguous ones. I know I'll get slammed for this but I think that if the author doesn't make it clear what happens, he or she is showing contempt for the readers; we are being left high and dry as if we don't matter. We are being denied the unveiling of the piece of art. We have been sitting in the room patiently waiting to see what it looks like, but you pack up the covered artwork and exit the room--leaving us to guess. There's a huge buildup but nothing is delivered. It's super unsatisfying. Good examples of weird, "gotcha" books and movies with unreliable heros: Gone Girl, The Sixth Sense, Secret Window, and Identity. If Odalie and Rose are one and the same person, that would be a dynamite ending and would generate tons of discussion. On the other hand, I feel like we were abandoned in a fog that will never lift.


message 31: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Lorraine wrote: "I also enjoyed the book very much - until I got to the ending. I appreciate an ambiguous or twist ending, but couldn't figure out any scenario that made sense. Will we have to wait for the screen a..."

Hi Lorraine! Hopefully some of what I wrote in response to the questions about who's-who between Rose and Odalie will help. Odalie was a real person to some extent, but the way it worked out in my mind had a lot to do with how much Rose was lying, both to herself as well as to the reader.

But I'm super intrigued to find out what choices the screenwriter and director will make, and whether they'll have imagined the ending to mean something different than I did!


message 32: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Marilyn wrote: "I enjoyed this book on CD. Did you listen to the reading of the book before it was marketed to make certain the reader conveyed "your" ending or do you believe people read/listen with their own vo..."

Hi Marilyn, Penguin put together the audio version, and they told me Gretchen Mol would be reading, which I was happy about and thought was a good fit. The funny thing about audio books is that it can be a bit mind-boggling to hear someone so professional read your words. It can be flattering but at the same time make you very shy to get up and speak at your own reading! As far as how it determines various interpretations, I like to think a story is always a collaborative experience between the writer and the reader -- and in this case, listener, too -- so I'm happy to embrace multiple interpretations.


message 33: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Elise wrote: "Hi Suzanne, really enjoyed The Other Typist and am looking forward to seeing the screen adaptation - I was wondering how much of a role you will have in its writing/production?"

Fox Searchlight shared the names of some of the screenwriters and casting choices they're considering, but other than that, the ball is pretty much all in their court going forward. I'm fascinated how these things come together -- so different from print publishing -- and am simply happy to be a fly on the wall at this point.


message 34: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "Hi Suzanne! I really and truly enjoyed reading The Other Typist, it was not something I would have normally read but I am glad I took a chance. I'm also so happy to hear there is going to be a movi..."

Hi Lisa! I responded to a similar question earlier, and wrote the following:

I got the idea for the book while working on my dissertation, which was supposed to be an academic project focusing on literature & culture of the 1920’s. While doing research, I came upon an obituary of a woman who had worked as a typist in a police precinct during Prohibition, and my imagination took off from there! I started hearing Rose’s narration in my head and decided to write it down. I got a bit derailed from the academic project and found myself working on a creative one instead.


message 35: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Laona wrote: "Hi Suzanne,
I am a librarian and happen to be leading a book discussion group tonight on your book. I know everyone is confused about the ending. I am sure we will have a lively debate, but the mai..."


Hi Laona, I hope I can answer this one to your satisfaction! It's tricky -- I know what I was thinking when I wrote it but I'm reluctant to spell it out and ruin other readers' interpretations. In my mind, there was an "other typist" named Odalie, but our ability to know exactly who she is and the nature of her actions is distorted by Rose's obsessive mind. And yes, I do think Rose is starting to suffer from a dissociative disorder, but to what extent I won't say. Rose spends a lot of time and energy claiming a higher moral ground and repeatedly outlining the differences between the two of them, but the more I wrote the more I realized she was lying to herself. I won't say who committed what, but I will say it was important to me that Rose was faced with a moment of realizing her idea of herself has completely eroded away and she's no different than Odalie.


message 36: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Kristy wrote: "I loved loved loved this book and I tell everyone to read it however I cannot process the ending. Frankly I debate it with everyone. What really happened in the end?"

Hi Kristy, I've been trying to answer some of the other readers' questions on this very topic. Here's what I posted as one of the answers:

It's tricky -- I know what I was thinking when I wrote it but I'm reluctant to spell it out and ruin other readers' interpretations. In my mind, there was an "other typist" named Odalie, but our ability to know exactly who she is and the nature of her actions is distorted by Rose's obsessive mind. And yes, I do think Rose is starting to suffer from a dissociative disorder, but to what extent I won't say. Rose spends a lot of time and energy claiming a higher moral ground and repeatedly outlining the differences between the two of them, but the more I wrote the more I realized she was lying to herself. I won't say who committed what, but I will say it was important to me that Rose was faced with a moment of realizing her idea of herself has completely eroded away and she's no different than Odalie.

I don't know if this'll do it for you, but I'm very reluctant to get more specific, in part because I've had readers come up to me and explain their own interpretations... and there have been some really great ones! I don't want to rob anyone of that, and I firmly believe any given book is only really 50% the writer's baby. The other half belongs to the reader.


message 37: by Samantha (new)

Samantha (samanthan) | 1 comments Hi Suzanne! I loved The Other Typist, and it's definitely one of the most thought provoking novels I've ever read. I was just wondering, I know you won't tell the readers exactly what the ambiguous ending meant because you want us to interpret it for ourselves, but have you told the people adapting the movie what you had in mind when writing the ending? Did you give them the big answer about who's Odalie/who's Rose or did you leave it up to them to interpret as well?


message 38: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Lili wrote: "Loved the book but what I wonder made you choose an ending that has confused everyone including me?"

Hi Lili, I definitely didn't mean to confuse everyone! As I wrote the book, I got to know my narrator better and better, and I realized how unreliable Rose was. The ending seemed a logical conclusion to me as her obsession with Odalie played out. As for the details of who perpetrated which crime, I know how I imagined that when I wrote it, but I've heard plenty of readers explain their own interpretations that I feel are totally legit, too, and I tend to refrain from disclosing too much so as not to rob anyone of their own version of what happened. I believe reading is a collaborative experience between the writer and the reader.


message 39: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Megan wrote: "I absolutely loved your book, I thought it was a very strong debut. I have two questions, what are you working on now, and will it be out soon (please say yes!)? Also, as many have stated, the endi..."

Hi Megan, I'm currently working on a second novel. It's set in the 1950's and the characters run around the beatnik scene and the publishing world in NYC. I just turned a draft of it into my editor but it probably won't come out until next year at the earliest. Thanks so much for your interest!

Re your question about the ending -- this one keeps popping up on this thread! Answering it is tricky... I've posted a few answers though that will hopefully help.


message 40: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Stacey wrote: "I work in a bookstore, and your book was recommended to me by one of my regular customers. Loved it! Just hoping that all the hoopla generated by your book will allow the ambiguity of the ending to..."

Thanks, Stacey! It's very heartening that you feel that way about the ambiguity of the ending.

I'm actually very interested in what Hollywood will do with the ending, as obviously the screenwriter and director are free to make different choices, so who knows what could happen. I wouldn't mind if they spelled some things out (or not), but I hope whatever they do, they make the ending surprising to the viewer!


message 41: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Monica wrote: "I'm always interested in the process of a favorite writer's book… how did the idea for "The Other Typist" come about? Was it something that unfolded or did you have a set idea in your head from the..."

Hi Monica! I just answered this for another reader. I wrote:

I got the idea for the book while working on my dissertation, which was supposed to be an academic project focusing on literature & culture of the 1920’s. While doing research, I came upon an obituary of a woman who had worked as a typist in a police precinct during Prohibition, and my imagination took off from there! I started hearing Rose’s narration in my head and decided to write it down. I got a bit derailed from the academic project and found myself working on a creative one instead.


message 42: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Irene wrote: "The Other Typist was one of my top favorite books I read last fall. I have recommended it to all my friends and will be read this spring by my book club! When is your next book? Can't wait to see w..."

Hi Irene! I'm so happy you liked The Other Typist -- thank you! Re your other question, I just wrote this response to another reader:

I'm currently working on a second novel. It's set in the 1950's and the characters run around the beatnik scene and the publishing world in NYC. I just turned a draft of it into my editor but it probably won't come out until next year at the earliest. Thanks so much for your interest!


message 43: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Karen wrote: "I loved this book. My question would be whether Rose chose Odalie or Odalie chose Rose (whether or not they are in fact the same person). Which of the background information was true, if any? Ke..."

That's a great question! I guess some of the answer depends a bit on what you think happened at the end of the book. I will say that, in my mind, Odalie was the kind of character who had an instinctive sense of people's weaknesses, and she understands Rose's weakness is her profound loneliness. On the other hand, Rose definitely picks Odalie to be her object of obsession. As I wrote the book, I realized that even I -- Rose's "creator" -- didn't believe the things Rose was saying, and that there were times when she was projecting onto Odalie, and "inventing" Odalie in a sense.

Re their backstories, I felt that Odalie was very clearly always making her backstory up, but that Rose's backstory is equally questionable. What interested me about Rose was how she convinced herself of her own lies.


message 44: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Catherine wrote: "I loved this book! I felt immersed in the time period in which it was set, and I so enjoyed being there. Of course, I, too, was not sure what happened at the end. I would love for Suzanne to te..."

Hi Catherine! Goodness... I've had so many requests to clear up the ambiguity of the ending! But yes, to answer your question, I think the ambiguity is actually part of the point. I was playing around with ideas of "truth." Rose was interesting to me because she works as a typist in a police precinct and is responsible for transcribing reports with accuracy, yet she has a very distorted perspective in how she sees life. She latches onto Odalie, who is an obvious liar, but the more we hear Rose talk, the more we realize *she* may be the biggest liar of all. Her obsessive nature was intended to make the reader question exactly how well she knew Odalie, and how much she had simply gotten lost in her own fantasies/delusions. Spelling out where that line is drawn kind of defeats the point.

At the same time, I hope I haven't let any readers down by letting the ambiguity stand!


message 45: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Elizabeth wrote: "Hello, Suzannne! My name is Elizabeth, and I found The Other Typist to be an absorbing story.
In your Q&A with Redbook you spoke of the writing process of The Other Typist as a passive process, ..."


Hi Elizabeth, it's definitely scarier writing your second book, versus writing your first. More critics, more to lose, etc... But if you love writing, you just kind of know it's something you're going to do regardless. Re your other question, yes, I think it still feels like "channeling" a voice. As a writer, I just get into the zone and listen, and hope something good or interesting will come out. Currently, my second book is also written in a first person voice, so the process has been the same. Although, I will say, Rose was a very fussy narrator and my new narrators cut to the chase a little more directly, and that's been nice.


message 46: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Anita wrote: "Hi Suzanne, I read The Other Typist last summer with a twitter book club group. We all loved the book and were blown away by it's ending! I'm curious what you're working on now. I'm excited I'll be..."

I need to get on twitter -- I didn't even know you could have a twitter book club group! How fun.

Currently I'm working on a second book. It's set in the 1950's and revolves around the publishing industry and the beatnik scene.

Looking forward to meeting you in Vero Beach, Anita!


message 47: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Samantha wrote: "Hi Suzanne! I loved The Other Typist, and it's definitely one of the most thought provoking novels I've ever read. I was just wondering, I know you won't tell the readers exactly what the ambiguous..."

Hi Samantha, I talked to the people at Fox Searchlight and told them what I was thinking when I wrote the book, but they have license to play up whichever angle interests them most. So Odalie may turn out to be a diabolical con artist in their version, or it may turn out that Rose made her up entirely and is the true perpetrator of all the chaos in the narrative. I'm actually in the odd position of being curious about it myself! I'm happy with whatever they decide; I think when a book becomes a movie it sort of needs to be reborn, in that needs to be treated as a fresh story instead of trying to remain slavish to the book. We'll see!


message 48: by Monica (last edited Mar 06, 2014 02:53PM) (new)

Monica (monicagalvan) | 2 comments After reading your response to what you are working on now which is focused on the 1950s, I am definitely excited about this! I love works of fiction set in the 20th century. Is there a particular reason you focus on these time periods? Do you think this will become a theme in your future work or will you also explore current times at some point too?


message 49: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Debbie wrote: "Could you PLEASE tell us what actually happened in the end? Or what you think happened? I LOVE strange and eerie endings, but not ambiguous ones. I know I'll get slammed for this but I think that i..."

Hi again, hmm, that troublesome issue of ambiguity. Here's what I wrote to a previous question in this thread:

I think the ambiguity is actually part of the point. I was playing around with ideas of "truth." Rose was interesting to me because she works as a typist in a police precinct and is responsible for transcribing reports with accuracy, yet she has a very distorted perspective in how she sees life. She latches onto Odalie, who is an obvious liar, but the more we hear Rose talk, the more we realize *she* may be the biggest liar of all. Her obsessive nature was intended to make the reader question exactly how well she knew Odalie, and how much she had simply gotten lost in her own fantasies/delusions. Spelling out where that line is drawn kind of defeats the point.
----
So... I hope this defense of ambiguity is not dissatisfying to you! I really do think it's part of the book I was trying to write. Keep in mind I was in graduate school when I wrote this book, and in a lot of ways, was using creative writing to explore my thoughts about the subjective relativity of "truth." So maybe there's a little bit of meta discussion in there, which would interest some readers but understandably other readers not all.

If it helps, I get the vague sense that the people I spoke to at Fox Searchlight were leaning towards a more clear version of the ending you mention, so... it'll be interesting to see!

Either way, as a writer I appreciate your reaction to the ending, and the book in general.


message 50: by Suzanne, Author of The Other Typist (new)

Suzanne | 25 comments Mod
Monica wrote: "After reading your response to what you are working on now which is focused on the 1950s, I am definitely excited about this! I love works of fiction set in the 20th century. Is there a particular ..."

Good question. I'm not really sure! I know I wrote The Other Typist in part because I'd repeatedly fallen in love with The Great Gatsby during different intervals in my life, first as a teenager and then again as an adult while teaching it to undergrads. And I know I started this second book because I'd been in a phase where I was re-reading and re-loving certain authors of the 1950s, including Salinger, Baldwin, Didion, Capote, etc. Sometimes writing a book is an act of writing a prolonged love letter to your favorite novels. At least, that's how it is for me.


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