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Group Read Archive > Group Fiction Read - March 2014 - Oryx and Crake - SPOILERS ALLOWED

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message 1: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
The discussion thread is now open. Spoilers are allowed on this thread. Don't read on if you haven't finished the book.


message 2: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments I have read the first two books which I appreciated but found quite harrowing. I haven't started Maddaddam yet because I am worried it will be too upsetting for me!! Anyone here read it yet?


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
I have not read anything by Margaret Atwood yet! Looking forward to this one.


message 4: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments Just started reading this. I'm liking it so far.


message 5: by Emma (new)

Emma | 48 comments I read this last year and loved it.


message 6: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments Have you read the next books in the series?


message 7: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments I have read the year of the flood which is kind-of parallel to oryx and crake and written in a very different style. Quite upsetting in parts though.


message 8: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments I'm reading it now. Upsetting, yeah I know what you mean. I really like the first book, this one the jury is still out.


message 9: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments I still haven't read the final book. I just think it will end up with all of them dying or something like that and I will find it too traumatizing!!


message 10: by Jessica (new)

Jessica W (pinkglow) | 7 comments I preferred the writing in Year of the Flood and agree with Michelle, its quite a parallel to oryx and crake. I'm waiting for the third one to come out in paperback


message 11: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments I have so much to read right now I'm not sure if about the third book. I would like to see what happens. :)


message 12: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments OK, here goes. I'm going to start the third book. I'll let you know what I think!


message 13: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments Lol, be brave!


message 14: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments Michelle what is it like?


message 15: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments I am still only in the first half but I am addicted! No matter how dark her subject, Atwood manages to inject humour into every situation. I'll let you know how I get on!


message 16: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments Oh my goodness - I feel wiped out after finishing the trilogy. The third book is not what I expected - which is a good thing! It was like the others in that I can't exactly say that I enjoyed it, but it was totally compelling and a roller-coaster of emotions. Definitely recommend it!


message 17: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments I guess I'll have to read it now. : )


message 18: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte (charley_100) | 322 comments WOW! Another fantastic work by Atwood. What repeatedly struck me was how possible it all seems, and the utter logic involved. If we develop the means to do these kinds of things, what or who is to stop us? Poor Jimmy! Despite the post-apocalyptic world he is wasting away in, I never felt irritated by his inevitable self-pity. It doesn't overwhelm the plot, just keeps the tone on a downer, with peaks and troughs created through the unravelling of the events that led to the 'red plague'. The pace was just right, and i am very grateful that it wasn't all rushed to squeeze in the possibility of other survivors...that we are left wondering what will Snowman decide to do. At times I was reminded of Charlie Brooker and his Black Mirror series. The websites and organisations described in Oryx & Crake had the same sickening humour and feeling that this could actually happen if we are not careful, e.g. Alibooboo. Some horrific ideas brought into play. Can't wait to read the others!


message 19: by Susie (new)

Susie (Contralto) | 1 comments Read Oryx and Crake several years ago without (doh!) realising it is the middle part of a trilogy. I intend to go back to square one and re- read O & C in its correct sequence.


message 20: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments Charlotte, have you read "Never Let me Go"? Another great example of this genre. Chilling, and so believable.


message 21: by Charlotte (last edited Mar 11, 2014 01:10PM) (new)

Charlotte (charley_100) | 322 comments No, I haven't..will look it up :)

....just did and there are heaps of books by that name! anthers name? ta!


message 22: by Pat (new)

Pat Morris-jones | 1372 comments Didn't know was a trilogy. We recently read Oryx and Crake in our book group. I loved it. May read the rest now, part of new challenge too. Thanks for that.


message 23: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
Charlotte wrote: "No, I haven't..will look it up :)

....just did and there are heaps of books by that name! anthers name? ta!"


Have recommended the book to you Charlotte


message 24: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth (cramptonhodnet) If it's the Kazuo Ishiguro novel you mean, the film is on some time this week - on Film 4 possibly - I'm recording it. No idea if it's any good, but worth a try I thought.


message 25: by Pat (new)

Pat Morris-jones | 1372 comments I love Ishiguro. Oh no another book recommendation to look at. Haha


message 26: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte (charley_100) | 322 comments Paul wrote: "Charlotte wrote: "No, I haven't..will look it up :)

....just did and there are heaps of books by that name! anthers name? ta!"

Have recommended the book to you Charlotte"


Cheers Paul!


message 27: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
Finished it yesterday, and reviewed here:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

It is very cleverly written, and sinister and disturbing too. The world that she has conjured sounds horrendous.


message 28: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (mrswhams) | 730 comments Mod
I finished today. It wasn't perfect by any means but, my, she has created a world that is incredibly imaginative, thorough and credible. Going to think on it and post some thoughts shortly.

Do we think Oryx was definitely the girl from the video? It is left a little ambiguous. She felt more of a cypher than a real person. Jimmy was also quite a passive character in many ways.


message 29: by Helen (new)

Helen French (helenfrench) | 52 comments I finished this a couple of days ago. My opinion on it kept changing as I read. Started off thinking it would be the BEST THING EVER. I have a penchant for post-apocalyptic fiction.

However, for me it really meandered at around 45-60 per cent of the way through, when Jimmy was in college (though it certainly picks up afterwards). And I gather that the point is that you don't know the entirety of Crake's motives or indeed Oryx's decision process, but I really wanted to know.

So perhaps there's nothing wrong with the book, it's just not quite the right book for me. Great writing, good premise, but just missing that something to elevate it further.

I have looked up reviews for the next two in the sequence but they seem quite mixed? I'd like to know more about Jimmy but (vague spoilers) apparently he only appears in a bit of the last one?

Hmmm. So it's a 3.5 for me I think.


message 30: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Lewis | 19 comments Does it matter if she is the girl in the video? Does it matter that we never find out her real name? I find her lack of external identity fascinating, but I'm not sure what it is supposed to mean.


message 31: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
In some ways no Michelle. But as the part of the title of the book is her name, then you would kind of hope so!


message 32: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 458 comments I guess it doesn't matter if Oryx is the child in the video, it is more what she represents. When she looks at the camera and they freeze her image, it is as if she can see them and what they are doing. She is an ethereal character and for me somewhat confusing. I think Jimmy has empathy for her and loved her. She represents a loss of humanity for man and hope for the Crakers???


message 33: by Helen (new)

Helen French (helenfrench) | 52 comments It's a bit strange and depressing mind, that this is a world where watching child pornography is so normalised that even the main character does it very casually. Yes, he feels guilty about it later, but even so, I think if a character in a contemporary novel did that, the audience would feel differently about it.


message 34: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
It is pretty grim isn't it Helen. I am not sure just how it fitted in with the story, but that may come out in the later books


message 35: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 553 comments Bit late, but I just finished this one. Post-apocalyptic fiction really isn't my thing, but I haven't read anything by Atwood before and wanted to try this. I found the world she creates convincing, but like Helen found the story really dipped in the middle when Jimmy and Crake are in college. I also found myself getting irritated with all the punning names for genetically altered foods, species etc - I wanted to say enough, I get it! Something about the style of the writing didn't appeal to me, but even so there were enough question marks at the end for me to want to read the next one, particularly as some people have said it is written in a different style.


message 36: by Paul (new)

Paul (halfmanhalfbook) | 5462 comments Mod
Cathy, that is similar to my feelings on the book, it was good without being great, but it wasn't dreadful either. The world she created was plausible, but there we're some disturbing points with the narrative.


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