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Archive - General > Is the setting of your novel interesting enough for readers to seek it out and visit?

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

Read Lois Winston’g blog about where I set my mystery trilogy, Murder at the Jersey Shore. Would you vacation there?

Here is the link: http://www.anastasiapollack.blogspot....

Richard Brawer
www.silklegacy.com


message 2: by Beth (new)

Beth  (techeditor) | 1005 comments Whenever I read a Tana French novel, I want to go to Ireland.


message 3: by Taylor (new)

Taylor I'm currently making my way through Louise Penny's books. In one of them, Inspector Gamache makes a trip to Haida Gwaii. I was unfamiliar with the setting, so googled it. The images were absolutely breathtaking. My husband and I are now planning on taking holidays there, perhaps next summer.


message 4: by Donna (last edited Feb 17, 2014 07:33AM) (new)

Donna | 64 comments One day I hope to visit Edinburgh and take a Rebus tour. It's a walking tour of character John Rebus' haunts from the Ian Rankin's series. There's actually a group tour for 10 or more. Check it out rebustours.com


message 5: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Amato (authorcarmenamato) | 23 comments My Emilia Cruz police procedural mystery series is set in Acapulco.

So many people have visited the place and are excited to find a mystery series set there. But I get excited when I get a review from someone who lives or vacations there and tell me how authentic the books are. And Kirkus Reviews liked how Mexican food is featured, too.

Sadly, Acapulco is now one of the most violent cities in the world, and that's an authentic part of the books, too.
http://carmenamato.net


message 6: by Heather (new)

Heather (trixieplum) | 193 comments Beth - I agree with Tana French's novels. They definitely put me in the mood to visit Ireland. And, Taylor, I'm the same way with Louise Penny's Gamache series. I know Three Pines doesn't exist, but I thik I'd enjoy visiting that area of Canada, as well as Montreal (and Haida Gwaii sounds lovely as well).


message 7: by Christine (new)

Christine Finlayson | 11 comments I love to read fiction that's set in places I'm planning to visit -- it's a fun way to learn about the local culture, and way less dry than perusing a guidebook. I just finished one mystery set on the Big Island of Hawai'i and added another book that's set there--in anticipation of travel ahead!


message 8: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Percival | 11 comments When the kids were young it was a tradition to choose books to read to them on holiday (many moons ago, now!) which had associations with where we visiting. One of the most memorable was a trip to Northumberland in the NE UK, where I read them The Wind Eye. A great time-slip children's novel by Robert Westall, set on the coast and the nearby islands. (Even though it's a children's book, I can recommend it for a good read for anyone.)

Last week we stayed in Daphne du Maurier country and rented a holiday cottage on Frenchmans Creek, (on the Helford River in Cornwall), where she set the novel of the same name. Wonderful part of the world!

My mystery novel Blood-Tied was set in Shropshire, the county where I did some family history research and the one I'm currently writing is set on the North Devon coast, which is wild and dramatic! Perhaps it might generate a bit of extra tourism when it gets published!


message 9: by Pamela (new)

Pamela (PamelaStAbbs) | 18 comments Edinburgh is a truly wonderful city. Scotland is so inspirational. So many authors rap their stories up with the cities and countryside.

And East Anglia is so different, wild and flat, man-made drainage systems and sand banks along the coast.

Happily I've been able to draw on both these places for the Inspector Campbell mysteries.


message 10: by Renee (new)

Renee Dussault Howell I actually read Midnight in the garden of good and evil after spending time in savannah, ga. Knowing the book was based on true events made me think about the places I visited and learned while there. Would love to go back there again.


message 11: by Karen (new)

Karen (karen94066) | 262 comments Mark de Castrique Laura Childs Not yet, but I have hopes of seeing Charleston because of Laura Childs Tea Shop Mystery series and Asheville because of Mark de Castrique's series.


message 12: by Karen (last edited May 11, 2014 11:01AM) (new)

Karen Beth wrote: "Whenever I read a Tana French novel, I want to go to Ireland.


I want to go there and books like this make me doubly want to.



message 13: by Karen (new)

Karen Wendy wrote: "When the kids were young it was a tradition to choose books to read to them on holiday (many moons ago, now!) which had associations with where we visiting. One of the most memorable was a trip to ..."
That is awesome. I love Daphne's books.


message 14: by Martyn (new)

Martyn Halm (amsterdamassassinseries) | 48 comments My Amsterdam Assassin Series is set in the Dutch capital, which is a popular tourist destination. And my novels show not only an insider view of Amsterdam, but also the dark side that's not even visible to Dutch citizens.

I've had several requests for giving 'Katla Tours' of Amsterdam. I'm working on an interactive map of Amsterdam, but the tours could also be fun...


message 15: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Percival | 11 comments Karen wrote: "Wendy wrote: "When the kids were young it was a tradition to choose books to read to them on holiday (many moons ago, now!) which had associations with where we visiting. One of the most memorable ..."

We're off to Port Quin in north Cornwall for a few days later this week. Not sure whether any novel was set there - it's a tiny place! The TV programme 'Doc Martin' was filmed just down the coast in Port Isaac, though it's not a series I've watched.


message 16: by Leigh (new)

Leigh | 6313 comments Wendy wrote: "Karen wrote: "Wendy wrote: "When the kids were young it was a tradition to choose books to read to them on holiday (many moons ago, now!) which had associations with where we visiting. One of the m..."

Port Isaac looks gorgeous. Doc Martin is a great show too.


message 17: by Andrew (last edited Jun 25, 2014 09:04AM) (new)

Andrew Nelson (andrewgnelson) | 2 comments Maybe I lucked out, but my book,Perfect Pawn, takes place in New York (New York City, Southampton, and Plattsburgh.) I don't think anyone needs a reason to visit NYC, but I hope I raised the readers interest in visiting the other two.


message 18: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Percival | 11 comments Leigh wrote: "Wendy wrote: "Karen wrote: "Wendy wrote: "When the kids were young it was a tradition to choose books to read to them on holiday (many moons ago, now!) which had associations with where we visiting..."

I've since found out that Port Quin was used many years ago as the film location for the Poldark novels, dramatised on the BBC. Coincidentally, there's a new Poldark dramatisation being filmed at the moment, which is due on our TV screens soon. Not sure if Port Quin features this time!


message 19: by Feliks (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) Even if a string of grisly, real-life murders occurred at the Jersey Shore it would not stop people from vacationing there. That's where people from all over the region have to go for their beach-time. Its convenient and has a lot to offer.


message 20: by Jo Ann (new)

Jo Ann Reinhold (jwreinhold) | 15 comments One of the books I am reading uses Clearwater Florida as its location. I grew up there and spent a lot of time on that beach! What's not to love beautiful white sand beaches on the Gulf of Mexico!


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Perfect Pawn (other topics)

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Mark de Castrique (other topics)
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