The Eye of the World (The Wheel of Time, #1) The Eye of the World discussion


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Is this series worth the read?

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message 1: by Neil (new)

Neil Astin Just looking for a new novel to read. This series from Robert Jordan have a lot of mixed reviews. It ranges from fantastic to awful. Does anyone have a opinion on why people have such a wide and mixed feelings on this story. Don't want to start another long series if it's only average. Or do you recommend another series? Thanks.


Becky It depends on what you like in a story. If you love intricate worlds, large casts of complex characters, twisting plots, and have a lot of patience, I'd definitely recommend The Wheel of Time series. I think Jordan was a genius. Others don't like the slow-paced plots of his books.


Gianluca If you enjoy Epic Fantasy and don't mind long books, I highly recommend it. I personally think it's one of the best Fantasy series around, and certainly one of my favorites.
But if you have problems with long storylines filled with hundreds of different characters, then the series is probably not for you.
With 14 long and sometimes slow-paced novels, The Wheel of Time requires a lot of dedication from the reader.


Raychell Pettijohn my two cents/rambling comments:
The story is a good one – the last three books move a bit faster than the middle books. The first three or so have a good pace but some of those in the middle drag. It’s not that it’s bad but Jordan had a habit of writing about everything, from the chair, to the clothing, and every little bit of detail for nearly all characters. Sometimes I wondered if he was paid by the word.
If you can afford it, I high recommend the audio books – I found them much more enjoyable to reading the books. Audible has them all and the two narrators do a wonderful job.
The story is a very long drawn out tale with so many subplots – some of which never really wrap up well – but life is like that. Also, a lot of the problems come simply because so many don’t trust others, or because they have some other hidden plot – even the main characters that start out together end up having hidden motives. It’s very complex and yes at times it just drags because you really don’t give a flying fig about some group and you just wish Jordan would get back to the main story. I could have very clearly seen another 10 or so books in the world that was created, glimmers of ideas that never were flushed out fully. If Jordan had lived and Sanderson hadn’t finished the tale – I think Jordan would have not stopped at just 3 more even with his claim of just one more.
Personally – I like the first book the best – the last book the least – I’m not saying the last book is bad, it does a good job of tying so many threads up, I just don’t care for battle/fight books and the last book is basically one long fight scene in which many die that I think should have lived.


Ciara Ballintyne This is still one of my two favourite series. I think the people who didn't like it just weren't right for it - they preferred something a bit shorter.

In my opinion, it's the best example of worldbuilding out there, I love the characters, and the plot is amazing. I, too, think Jordan was a genius (he must have been, to keep it all straight).

Raychell above said Jordan was given to over description, and that is true, but I find I just skim past his overly long descriptions when I find them too tedious.

I am currently reading The Great Hunt for possibly the tenth time - yes, tenth. I picked this series up in 1992, and I haven't read the last book yet, so this is it, my last hurrah.

I personally don't think anyone can be said to be widely read in fantasy if they haven't at least tried The Wheel of Time. It is the classic of our own age.


Evan Geller The reason the opinions are so varied is that the writing is so uneven. The world building is indeed epic but the plotting, dialogue, descriptions range from masterful to tedious, often within the span of a few pages. Much is redundant or superfluous, many lost plot threads and weak subplots. Completely agree with the above post about the audiobooks being easier to enjoy than the written tomes. Certainly worth reading the first book--if you're not taken in by the first, stay away. The first book is one of the best of the series.


message 7: by Richard (new)

Richard Hartwell One commenter made a facetious note that Jordan might have been paid by the word. Not as ridiculous as it sounds. The Wheel of Time has an almost Dickensian quality to it: lengthy descriptions; multiple characters; several plot lines running simultaneously; great world building; etc. It could almost be set up as magazine installments, much as Charles Dickens' work. I rarely read this genre, but once I started I ended up buying each book as it came out and in hardback. For me that's a strong recommendation.


message 8: by Audra (last edited Nov 20, 2013 08:53AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Audra J Raychelle pretty much summed up my thoughts exactly!


Becky Paterson My Dad actually has the entire series and has read it many times. He suggested that I give them a go a few years back and I have never looked back. Jordan is my all time favourite fantasy novelist. The switching back and forth between characters and groups can be incredibly annoying, but for all the right reasons! You always want to get back to the part of the journey you have just left, but before you even realise it you are hooked on the next section! His characters are so whole, you connect with each of them individually quite intimately which I think is an incredible achievement.
They are enormous books and there are a lot to get through but they are in my opinion a complete joy and totally worth it.


message 10: by B.J. (new) - rated it 4 stars

B.J. Richardson I started reading this series back when there was only 6 books. Every time a new book came out I reread all of them. This series is the standard for which all series of our time will be judged. If you want something light and easy, go read Hunger Games. If you want great modern fantasy and epic wolddbuilding by a true genius. Read on.


Brian Yes, defintely. While the middle books are a little slower than the first few and the last three, they are still good.

Part of the reason so many became pissed off during the middle books is because they (and myself as well) were reading them as published. So it was frustrating to wait two or three years, then read a really long book but still not having certain arcs finished, and then knowing we had to wait another two or three years. Now you can just read them straight through (or maybe take a couple book break after reading a few at a time).


message 12: by Neil (last edited Dec 22, 2013 09:01AM) (new)

Neil Astin Ok, I think I have a good idea about this series now. This is similar to George R.R. Martin's Games of Thrones. I really enjoyed the first book and less and less with each successive book until the fourth book, A Feast for Crows, that was excruciating to read. I picked up the fifth book but couldn't get into it anymore. Just so much repetition and rambling that goes no where. I think I'll hold off on starting Robert Jordan for a later time. Thanks for your opinions. It was very informative.


message 13: by Beth (new) - rated it 5 stars

Beth I love this series. Well written books. Jordan was a very detailed writer that made you actually picture the places and see the people he was describing in his books. There was no guessing as to what he meant when he described his characters experiences. I love this most of all about his books. The last books in the series don't have the same feel due to Jordan developing cancer and passing away. But what he did leave behind, Sanderson put it together in order to finish one of the very few well written fantasy series I've had the privilege to read.


Raychell Pettijohn *shudder* The Wheel of Time books are SOOOO much better than Game of Thrones. IMHO at least.
Give The Eye of the World a go - my suggestion is to start with Chap 1 and skip the Prologue. At least for a short bit. I personally tell people to not read the Prologue in the first book until maybe half way through when you have a better understanding of matters. Heck, go to Amazon and read the "look inside" part - if you don't like it by then, it might not be your cup of tea.


Raychell Pettijohn Or, if you don't have an Audible account - you can get a free trail membership (just remember to cancel after the trail period) and you can get the first book free. Reading and Kramer do a wonderful job!


message 16: by Jeff (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jeff Kohmstedt I think you could safely read the first three books of the series and be satisfied with a Google search to find out how it all ends.


Ginger Evan wrote: "The reason the opinions are so varied is that the writing is so uneven. The world building is indeed epic but the plotting, dialogue, descriptions range from masterful to tedious, often within the..."
I have to completely agree. I enjoyed the first book but each book after lost more intirest. The writing became sparatic and there were too many characters I just didnt care about.


Godslayer Absolutely worth it. I couldn't stop reading them when I first found them, I got through the 11 that were out at the time in about 2 months.


message 19: by Sal (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sal Coraccio I'll just pipe in and say YES. Read them. Even when parts of it drag slightly with description - savor that. When you've read them all then they are gone - and you will miss them dearly.

And, to address a few comments asking, jokingly, if he was paid by the word: worthy of note that his editor at Tor Books, Harriet McDougal - was also his wife.

So, it may be easy to understand why his work seemed a little in need of pruning. But, now that he's gone, and even with Sanderson's deft and skillful finish - I do very much wish there were more words from this fabulously talented story teller.


R.M.F. Brown The plot of the first book is lifted straight out of the fellowship of the ring, the characters are poorly developed, there are subplots that go on for years or end up being forgotten about, Nynaeve is the most irritating fictional character in the history of literature/film/tv/cavemen drawings on walls, according to some, there are at least 200 characters whose name begins with A or B (meaning there are at least 3000 different characters in the entire series)

I could go on and on. In short, I think it is an unoriginal, bloated mess of a series. I wish I could retrieve the time back I wasted on these books.


Teresa I believe that the series is worth the read, if for no other reason than Wheel of Time is considered (based on sales and longevity) as one of the most popular/famous fantasy series of all time.

I'm currently rereading the series (on book 6) and I can understand what some of the others on this thread are saying about Nyneave. I like her, while still being annoyed with the braid tugging. As far as the large amount of characters, Jordan just happens to name them all. There are only several dozen that you really have to remember.

I believe that the Wheel of Time series is different from the Lord of the Rings. I believe that the Lord of the Rings is much more quest/adventure, while the Wheel of Time is more political and character driven.


message 22: by Gumps (last edited Dec 20, 2013 10:34AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gumps I think many of the people above stated it well, but I have to throw my own two cents in (and I will try to summarize, which is not like me at all).

Pros
- Epic World Building: Many races, many countries, many factions - all thoroughly thought out and for the most part differentiated.
- Interesting Magic System: Fantasy books can be demolished by the lack of a defined and cohesive magic system, but not here. And it is great that over 14 books, we continue to see new and interesting uses.
- Engaging Charchters: No matter who you are, there is likely a character or two you will like among the assemblage of characters that Jordan/Sanderson trots out for you.
- Interesting Plotting (at times): Though much of the book is built off of a major fantasy trope (big bad is building power and the forces of good must stop him) there are definately some unique plot twists that keeps the story surprising and interesting.
- Brandon Sanderson: Yes, this is Robert Jordan's world, but Brandon Sanderson has done a remarkable job putting the final touchs to the story and bringing it to a satisfiable conclusion. I will be honest, I had stopped reading the series around book 7, and only picked it up again when I heard that Brandon Sanderson was going to write the final novels. He actually helped progress many of the characters from the static one-dimensionality that they settled into over books 4-9.

Cons:
- Too Many Characters: Now I wouldn't have minded this if they did not become focal characters (characters in which chapters revolved around). But because of this, the books dragged and there was much superflous information incorporated into the books. The difference between Game of Thrones, that also has had many focal characters, is that in Game of Thrones it is a requirement as other focal characters are killed off.
- Lack Of Character Growth for 75% of the Series: It is frustrating when a character is the same annoying self over 10,00 pages, especially when that character is a self-righteous and arrogant. By the way, nearly every non Taveren character in this book has spent hundreds of pages being self-righteous and arrogant.
- Poor Plotting and Dialog: Yeah I know that I said plotting was a strength, but there is good and bad. For much of books 4-9, the main vehicle used for character intereactions is misunderstanding. In part because all ofthe characters are unwilling to talk to each other. Yes, it is very realistic that there are some characters that should be like this, but nearly every one?
- Portrayal of Women: Everyone women in this series knew more about everything than any body else (at least until Sanderson becomes involved, and then still some). Yes, there were strong women, which was good to see, but they were all arrogant, stubborn and unwilling to listen to anybody else. I can't think of a single female character that did not act this way the majority of the time in the first 75% of the books.
- Lack of Story Development in Books 4 - 9: this is an opinion, but to me it felt like they kept building and building without actually driving anywhere in the story. More and More sub-plots were added, places and people introduced, without any real purpose (many times just being a repeat of something else that already happened). It is also dissappointing that there was little chance that by the end of the book all of the various sub-plots could ever be completely wrapped up.

OK, that was me keeping it brief.


Annelise Neil wrote: "Ok, I think I have a good idea about this series now. If I understand correctly, then this is similar to George R.R. Martin's Games of Thrones. I really enjoyed the first book and less and less w..."

I think you are making a mistake by comparing The Wheel of time series to the Game of Thrones series. I have read both. I came to the same opinion on the Game of Thrones. Had a lot of trouble with the 5th book because it became so redundant. The Wheel of time, I don't believe, loses its charm over the series. It is one of the best.


message 24: by Gumps (last edited Dec 11, 2013 12:56PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Gumps Jeff wrote: "I think you could safely read the first three books of the series and be satisfied with a Google search to find out how it all ends."

I would append your suggestion. The first three books and then the last three books by Sanderson. As mentioned before, Sanderson saved this series for me, I would never have finished otherwise.


Gumps Brian wrote: "Yes, defintely. While the middle books are a little slower than the first few and the last three, they are still good.

Part of the reason so many became pissed off during the middle books is be..."



I am not sure I agree with your assertion. I had initially read through book 5 and then took a long (many year pause) as I had lost interest. I picked up the series again last year once I knew that it was pretty much done. I then started over and read straight through (book 14 had arrived by the time I was there). No gaps between books this time, and I STILL found books 4-9 to be poorly plotted, over-bloated and over sized. The only reason I continued with the series was because I wanted to see whatSanderson could do with a well developed world that was not his own. And I am glad I did, because I think Sanderson finished it off exceedingly well.


R.M.F. Brown 14 books at 800 pages per book - says it all. I'm pretty sure that's more than the entire works of Shakespeare.

I like epic fantasy as much as the next person, but the padding of some of those books is beyond belief. Lesson: never have your wife as editor!


Natalia Gumps wrote: "I think many of the people above stated it well, but I have to throw my own two cents in (and I will try to summarize, which is nto like me at all).

Pros
- Epic World Building: Mmany races, many c..."


Thank you Gumps: Best review of WoT ever! It expresses my every sentiment exactly! Maybe now I can finally smoothe my skirt and stop tugging my bloody braid in annoyance at the rest of the world who appears to have read an entirely different series to myself. The only reason I ever decided to finish reading this series was Brandon Sanderson, whose books I was already a fan of.


Wayne Elsner I have enjoyed the books I have read in the series. Only a couple to go. A friend of mine hated it. I think the difference between us is expectations. When I start a major fantasy novel I expect to have almost to many characters to follow, a plot that isn't easy and a story that never seems to end. If you want to read something that is an easy read then it's not for you. My only complaint comes from reading the series long before the last book came out. I had to wait for each book to be published and by the time I got my hands on it I had to refresh myself on the story. I think a new reader picking up the series now that it is complete would be able to immerse themselves in the world that Robert Jordan created and find the joy of reading.


Ronnie Darby Absolutely. I think the first one Eye of the World is best. This series is 13 or more books and some of them just go on and on forever. Keep reading, though as the story is intricate and far ranging. It's the best fantasy series, by far, in my opinion; and I have read most of them.


Ronnie Darby Neil wrote: "Just looking for a new novel to read. This series from Robert Jordan have a lot of mixed reviews. It ranges from fantastic to awful. Does anyone have a opinion on why people have such a wide and..."

I think that the reason people don't like the series is that it is 13 or more books long before all the issues are resolved. Also, the author tends to go on and on even with the most insignificant things. One tends to bet bogged down in what appears to be insignificant; however that is what develops the characters so fully. I have read the entire series and looked forward to each one. Eye of the World is by far the best as far as I am concerned and is well worth reading, even if it is the only one of the series that you read. There will end up being a lot of loose ends though.


message 31: by Ian (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ian I'm sure that there are a lot of fans, but after enjoying the first book, kind of liking the second, and was super bored for thousands of pages thereafter, I'd recommend against it.

Also Jordan writes women like Eddings; random icy chicks fueled by unsubstantial rage.

I got about seven books in after about three books of pure series-milking drudgery.

It was perfect when he died without finishing. I mean, of course he would.

I'd recommend about 100 books before this series.


message 32: by Ronnie (last edited Dec 23, 2013 03:48PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ronnie Darby Ian, all you say is true. There are, however, places in all the books that are good. I won't say that they are worth all the boredom and aggravation though. I read it all; but that is just the way I am.

I would point out however, that the last three books were written by another author after the original died, and his writing, while it stays true to the original author, and he works from the original's notes, his writing is vastly superior and has none of the original's faults.


Sharanda I love this series because I love getting involved in an epic series where I get invested in the lives of the characters. And this is an epic series.

It honestly depends on what type of stories you like.


Thomas Ciara wrote: "...I think the people who didn't like it just weren't right for it - they preferred something a bit shorter.

...but I find I just skim past his overly long descriptions when I find them too tedious.i>

A bit contradictory…

This series is overlong and for what it delivers there are far better books on the market. The sheer volume of description leads me to think that Jordan thought his readers to lack a certain intelligence that they couldn’t come to certain conclusions themselves or assume that yes a woman does were a dress.

Not that I hated every part of the book it’s just after the first three it’s basically not worth the time and effort. One book, possibly 8, actually has no plot story in it what-so-ever. The female characters are awful with the majority all being effectively typecast with the same personality…even ones which have not ever been in contact with each other. I am male and I even find it offensive how females are stereotyped in this series. Finally the main villains are all f*****g morons. Quite simply Macaulay Culkin could have defeated these guys.



message 35: by Christian (new) - added it

Christian I've read all the books Jordan wrote himself, but not the one(s?) that came after and I have to say the worst thing about them is the sheer potential they had. Jordan had a really good story and a lot of good ideas, but he needed a much better editor. It's painfully obvious when you read his books that by the third book his fame has made him untouchable for an editor, which is a damn shame. I suspect the series would have been far more enjoyable if he'd had an editor who'd dare to go through his manuscript with a red marker and say fix this or we don't publish. If he or she could have kept him to a deadline that would have been a plus as well.
As it is we're left with a work that many people simply gives up on in the end because it's become much to tedious to care about.


Ronnie Darby Christian wrote: "I've read all the books Jordan wrote himself, but not the one(s?) that came after and I have to say the worst thing about them is the sheer potential they had. Jordan had a really good story and a ..."

You make an excellent observation here. However, you say that you didn't read the last three books. They were produced from notes Jordan left when he died. The new author is a MUCH better writer than Jordan and I know that you would love these books.


message 37: by Christian (new) - added it

Christian Ronnie wrote: "You make an excellent observation here. However, you say that you didn't read the last three books. They were produced from notes Jordan left when he died. The new author is a MUCH better writer than Jordan and I know that you would love these books."

Perhaps, but in order to make heads or tails of them I'd have to slog through the other 11 books and by now I simply don't care enough about the characters to go through that. That's the reason why I stopped in the middle of Knife of Dreams and haven't picked it up since.


message 38: by Taygus (new) - added it

Taygus Christian wrote: "Ronnie wrote: "You make an excellent observation here. However, you say that you didn't read the last three books. They were produced from notes Jordan left when he died. The new author is a MUCH b..."

Just refresh through summaries online.


Teresa I am beginning to notice Jordan's need to name everyone. Do I really need to know the names of Myrelle's three Warders? It's not like I'll ever remember them. Just state that there are three and that they are pretty much like the rest of the Warders we have encountered in the books so far.


message 40: by Todd (new) - rated it 4 stars

Todd Beth wrote: "I love this series. Well written books. Jordan was a very detailed writer that made you actually picture the places and see the people he was describing in his books. There was no guessing as to..."

Some might argue that if the author feels the need to describe every minute detail and is unable to trust his readers to fill in the blanks, he is a weak writer.


message 41: by Christian (new) - added it

Christian Todd wrote: "Some might argue that if the author feels the need to describe every minute detail and is unable to trust his readers to fill in the blanks, he is a weak writer. "
I think it's more that he was an incessant padder. At the time there weren't much epic fantasy about and what there was was completely dominated by Tolkien's work. His rather long works. If you remove all the superfluous descriptions from Jordan's work you end up with a book that's half as thick. (And a much more enjoyable read btw.)
Now if you look at the epic fantasy subgenre you'll soon realise that the books are, as a rule, very long to the point where it becomes a defining feature.
So I think Jordan found himself in a situation where he wanted to write epic fantasy, but his story weren't long enough (In 1990) to qualify. So he had to add a lot of filler.

Personally I think he would have been much better of if he'd condensed the books together two and two.


Ronnie Darby I agree totally with Christian. I did, however, really like the series, especially the first book (Eye of the World). This, however, is not a series that I would read a second time, like I do most others. Like Tolkien, I think of him as a pioneer of the epic fantasy.


Kenny I read each book as they came out up until about the 7th one, then I stopped(can't remember why). With the announcement of the last book coming out I reread the ones I had already read and then the newer ones timing it to reach the last book just after it's release. I loved it and really enjoyed the journey. Yes they sometimes dragged a bit, but as I was caught up in the story I got past these parts. I prefer RJs writing to Brandon Sandersons and thought he felt rushed compared to RJ.
I may require a bit of effort but I think it's worth it.


message 44: by Todd (new) - rated it 4 stars

Todd I finally gave up somewhere around book 8 or 9, and, quite frankly, I don't have the time or the inclination to bother with trying to slog through them again. They need SERIOUS editing... say 1/3 to 1/2 their current size. There's just WAY too much filler material.


Sarah  EternityFae Neil wrote: "Just looking for a new novel to read. This series from Robert Jordan have a lot of mixed reviews. It ranges from fantastic to awful. Does anyone have a opinion on why people have such a wide and..."

I'm really enjoying it so far, currently reading 'The Dragon Reborn'. My husband has read the entire series more times than I care to imagine. He's encouraged me to share in something he finds enjoyable and, honestly, I find myself absorbed in the story.

The people, places, events make me want to pull out my sketchbook and draw what it is that Robert Jordan's descriptions bring to mind!

All I can say is if you look at the outline of the story and it pulls you in, then go ahead and read it. Nothing anyone can say here should influence that. The only person that could be missing out would be you.


message 46: by Ronnie (last edited Jan 16, 2014 06:56AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ronnie Darby I totally agree. Many people here have complained about the detail in the books; but for me, that's what kept me coming back. It transported me into entirely new body's, backgrounds, and personality's. It has so many minor characters that are seldom or never revisited; but that reflects any real active life. The series is long with the ends left dangling book after book, only to be resolved in the very last ones. With the books following so many charter's lives in such detail it is like reading several different books at the same time. BTW, I've read the complete series more than once, and enjoyed each reading more than the previous time.


Kenny Ronnie wrote: "I totally agree. Many people here have complained about the detail in the books; but for me, that's what kept me coming back. It transported me into entirely new body's, backgrounds, and personal..."

I think it is a series that is easier to read if you are able to read them one after another. I like the depth and detail and only occasionally found them dragging. Yes it's true that some books didn't advance the story and I think waiting 2 or 3 years for that put a lot of people off them.
I really want to read the A Game of Thrones series, but I refuse to start it knowing that GRR Martin could take another decade to finish them. (if he ever does)


message 48: by Ronnie (last edited Jan 16, 2014 03:06PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ronnie Darby Kenny wrote "I think it is a series that is easier to read if you are able to read them one after another."

To be honest, I don't think that I would have read past the second book if I had started reading when the first book was published, then had to wait between the others. There is a way to get virtually every book written since the early 1800's on the Internet for free via IRC if you know about it and how. Of course, it is totally illegal. I was able to get all except the last 3 all at once this way. I did have to wait about a year, as I recall, between each of the last 3; but they were so well written that it was worth the wait. Especially for the last one, as that is where all the loose ends are tied up and the story comes to it's climax.

I have also read A Game of Thrones series so far and, to be honest, don't understand at all why all the fuss over this story. I personally rank it more toward the bottom of my very long list of fantasy that I have read. The first one really didn't "light my fire" as so many others of that genre have. I've read the others since, but they weren't any better. I guess "to each his own".


Andrew Ronnie wrote: "Kenny wrote "I think it is a series that is easier to read if you are able to read them one after another."

To be honest, I don't think that I would have read past the second book if I had started..."


Good for you Ronnie,
You got to read a massive series that you've enjoyed immensely and didn't have to pay! I don't quite understand your bragging about book piracy, so many people are reliant on book sales to maintain their employment. Bookshops are closing up in huge numbers and it isn't only due to e-readers. But hey, you saved a couple of bucks and obviously feel pretty good about it. Team Jordan, Sanderson and the kid who just lost his job at the publishers or the bookstore are rapt for you, spend it wisely.


message 50: by Ronnie (last edited Jan 22, 2014 05:24AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ronnie Darby Andrew wrote: "Ronnie wrote: "Kenny wrote "I think it is a series that is easier to read if you are able to read them one after another."

To be honest, I don't think that I would have read past the second book i..."


I certainly understand the sarcasm and sentiment of your comment, Andrew. I feel the same way now that I am writing myself. In my defense, at the time I hadn't been able to work because of illness for a number of years and had to rely on the generosity of others to live and eat anywhere but the streets and would have never been able to read at all otherwise. I didn't even have transportation to the library or even buss fair. Although I could use the means I spoke of today, I haven't done so since my fortunes improved and I bought my first Kindle. The only free books I have read sense those days have been free from Amazon. I do feel for that boy who lost his job, but he would have lost it anyway if he was relying on sales to me.

I regret that you took my comment as bragging. I was only trying to point out two things. Mainly I was explaining how I was able to read all those books without having to wait so long between each one.

I was also pointing out that there is a way for books to be available to a few people who know how, to be able to get books without paying for them, not unlike how music was massively pirated until the record industry shut down, for the most part, the companies that allowed this practice. Unlike the music publishers, there are no companies that make possible the pirating of books; it is inherent in the Internet itself and will continue, probably thorough out our lifetimes.

Again, unlike the record pirating, it was only possible because quite a number of companies sold programs that made finding and downloading music very easy. The process I used was quite technical and way beyond the abilities of the vast number of people who otherwise would have been pirating books were there such an easy way to get them.

I hope this clears my intent in posting what I did.


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