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First Book: Mistborn > First Section Discussion

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message 1: by Jason (new)

Jason | 55 comments Mod
Questions for the First section will be posted here.


message 2: by Jason (last edited Jun 03, 2009 01:00PM) (new)

Jason | 55 comments Mod
Now that we all have finished the first section I wanted to do a little charachter warm up.

What are your first impressions of Vin?

Is she created in a way that draws you to her/makes you want to read her story? (What appeals to you? What would you have changed about her first appearance?)

What were your initial impressions of the Survivor?

Does the manner in which he saves the girl make you sympathize with him and his goals? Or does it make you think he is as much a butcher as the others? (How would you have introduced the Skaa struggle differently?)




message 3: by Robin (new)

Robin (robinsullivan) | 22 comments Mod
What are your first impressions of Vin? Taking just this portion of the book into account I thought she was pretty Stereotypical abandoned orphan who has turned to a life as a thief. I have read the entire book and I think she gets better with time but to this stage I think she is portrayed pretty "cookie-cutter" and there are some things that could have been done to help her break out of her mold.

Is she created in a way that draws you to her/makes you want to read her story? I'm neither drawn in or repelled by what has happened so far. The character of "the survivor" holds much more interest to me.

(What appeals to you? What would you have changed about her first appearance?) I would have "held more back - I don't like the thoughts of her brother entering in - I think the whole "you are so alone" and "others will betray you" is too heavy handed at this stage -- too much tell and not show - we should "get" this by observing her interactions over time.

What were your initial impressions of the Survivor? Very interesting and mysterious - this is what has me "hooked" to find out more about him. Notice that in comparision to Vin - where to much is revealed his information is nicely held back to get me to read more.

Does the manner in which he saves the girl make you sympathize with him and his goals? Or does it make you think he is as much a butcher as the others? On one hand I thought it was a bit "over the top" - on the other hand it seemed pretty "bad-a$$" and wanted me to know how he could do it. I was not put off by the "blood thirsty" nature of it feeling that they "deserved what they got. I did think it showed a very Machevelli side to him where he completely disrupted the entire town with little to no regardsd as to how his action would affect others - but that again was part of what made him interesting.


(How would you have introduced the Skaa struggle differently?) Again I think the Skaa was very "heavy handed" here is a situation where the author has to trust the reader more to come to the conclusions he wants - I felt "beat over the head" about the skaa...to the point that I was saying to myself while reading..."Yes, Sanderson, we understand the skaa are poor, miserable, and oppressed - let's move on".



message 4: by DavidO (new)

DavidO (drgnangl)
I liked Vin at this point in the story. She was weak, but sympathetic. It was nice to learn she had some powers when we finally learn it, as at that point I wanted her to stop getting hurt.

I liked the survivor better, because he was actively trying to improve things for others. I agree with Robin that holding back information about him made him more interesting than Vin.

I had read Elantris before, and the poor in that book were very similar to the poor in this book. I'm not sure why Sanderson kept presenting the poor like this, as though he had some kind of point. Perhaps the point is that feudalism is bad or something like that. But he never really follows through with it. Just keeps presenting these super poor and weak victims of society to no real point.

I didn't mind how they were presented at this point in the story. Here they have names. Later they become more faceless and underrepresented to the point where they are just faceless masses.



message 5: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) David wrote: "
II didn't mind how they were presented at this point in the story. Here they have names. Later they become more faceless and underrepresented to the point where they are just faceless masses.
..."


Kind of like the poor in our society.....

I liked Vin, but agree that she was somewhat stereotyped to begin with. Definitely agree that the Survivor is what drew me into the story and initiated my interest...


message 6: by Jason (new)

Jason | 55 comments Mod
1) My first impressions of Vin were that she was overdone. One thing I struggle with in my writing, and maybe other newer writers as well, is overplaying your stereotype. Vin broke away from the type, which she had to to become a major character, but it was laid on pretty thick. Although, not entirely unplausibly-it was a rough group she ran with-but then it should have been much harder for her to trust the new group she was with.

2) Her "luck" ability intrigued me a little at the beginning. But without that, I would have thought of her as a nobody character. Other than wanting to understand her ability I was not intersted in her this early in the book-I think she becomes much more interesting later one.
If I were to draw Vin from the beginning I may have thrown in a little more backbone. Give her something to differentiate her other than her ability-some more conflict/emotionally driven. With all that being said-I still found the bookto be excellent and was one of my favorite reads in a while.

3) I thought the survivor was great from the beginning. I really liked his "I have the ability to stop it so I will" attitude. I tried to figure out if later on he meant for those people to be there, that it wasn't carelessness that lead him to running the Skaa off the plantation-it felt that way to me.

The way he saved the girl definately made me sympathize with him. An injustice to one is an injustice to all.

The Skaa struggle was a little heavy-but it needed to be. To show later on how dampened the Skaa were-and why they needed something World shattering to move them-otherwise the great sacrifice could just have been more dramatics for an already accused dramatic character.


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