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The Handmaid's Tale (The Handmaid's Tale, #1)
This topic is about The Handmaid's Tale
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Karena (karenafagan) Please keep comments to these chapters. Warning: There will be spoilers.


Selena I read this book many, many years ago. I can't wait to hear what everyone has to day about it.


Katy (kathy_h) Haven't read this one, I am in for the group read. Looking forward to it.


Beth (k9odyssey) What a bleak dystopian world full of oppression and discrimination. I am finding it interesting to read but so far not really enjoying it. Some of the titles of certain things and people are strange. For instance: econo-wife.


Christine I would not say I "enjoyed" this book but it was a page turner for me. Once I started this book I wanted to see it through to the end- for better or worse. One line that really stuck out for me in the beginning of the book was when Aunt Lydia said "There is more than one kind of freedom, Freedom to and freedom from" p. 24. I guess I had never really thought about how freedom could be defined so differently.


Lauri | 151 comments Beth wrote: "What a bleak dystopian world full of oppression and discrimination. I am finding it interesting to read but so far not really enjoying it. Some of the titles of certain things and people are stra..."

Do not get too discouraged Beth. I found I did not really enjoy about the first third of the book. I found the author's writing style a little bit too choppy. But, I am almost done reading the book and I find I am enjoying it more and more, especially as the protagonist's past life is revealed more.


message 7: by Pam (new) - rated it 3 stars

Pam I am enjoying the book, but it seems like all books about the future are really bleak and disturbing. It is definitely a page-turner. I can only hope it turns out well in the end!


Jessica | 464 comments C wrote: "I would not say I "enjoyed" this book but it was a page turner for me. Once I started this book I wanted to see it through to the end- for better or worse. One line that really stuck out for me in ..."

That is one of my favorite quotes from this piece. I never thought of freedom that way either.

Hope you all are enjoying the book. Love this story and, quickly, became one of my favorites.


Samantha Glasser I am really enjoying this book so far. There are so many questions, but I'm coming up with all of these theories on what is going on, so it will be interesting to read on and see if I am right.

For example, Aunt Lydia seems like a teacher for this futuristic world, not an actual aunt. I'm wondering if I'll begin to hate her over time the more I learn about her.

I want to know what caused this massive change in cultures. I want to know what happened to this woman's daughter and husband. I want to know where the physical limits of this new society are and how they maintain their solitude. It sounds like a religious cult so far but it seems to have been very successful in completely and fully altering the lives of the people there. Is the government involved?

One of the scenes that really stood out to me was when the narrator saw the Japanese tourists staring and taking pictures and she was shocked by their "short" skirts. What a change from the perception today!


message 10: by Beth (new) - rated it 2 stars

Beth (k9odyssey) This stood out for me too. So now I am wondering how wide spread this revolting behavior is. Is it a Jonestown kind of thing which I would find somewhat believable or does it span a larger area. The Japanese tourists made me think about how people go to Lancaster County PA and gawk at the Amish lifestyle.

Samntha wrote: One of the scenes that really stood out to me was when the narrator saw the Japanese tourists staring and taking pictures and she was shocked by their "short" skirts. What a change from the perception today!


Melanti I read this book at least 10 or 15 years ago, and I remember that I liked it a lot and remember some of the major points. Serenity Joy's story, for instance, the forbidden reading, and the overall gist of how the society formed to begin with.

Now that I'm re-reading, I find I'd forgotten a lot more than I thought I had. Still enjoying it just as much the second time around!


message 12: by Christine (last edited Sep 06, 2013 11:50AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Christine Jessica wrote: "C wrote: "I would not say I "enjoyed" this book but it was a page turner for me. Once I started this book I wanted to see it through to the end- for better or worse. One line that really stuck out ..."

I really did enjoy this book quite a bit. It only took me 2 days to read it because I found the story so interesting.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

I've been meaning to read this book for years but never got around to it for some reason. So I figured why not take the chance to read it now even though I'm late to the group read.
I'm liking it so far. I love that the story itself is a mystery. Of what happened, how it happened, and why it happened. I'm thinking some kind of disaster, natural or man made.
The line about freedom having two meanings opposite from one another got my attention too. Two groups of people with completely different views from each other both believe themselves are free. Even if it is freedom 'from' choice.


Alana (alanasbooks) | 208 comments Christine wrote: "One line that really stuck out for me in the beginning of the book was when Aunt Lydia said "There is more than one kind of freedom, Freedom to and freedom from" p. 24. I guess I had never really thought about how freedom could be defined so differently."

I think it's interesting that Atwood has one of the Aunts say this, because it really IS a true statement...but told from one of these hypocritical ladies it comes across as so perverted. You CAN have "freedom from" but that doesn't mean that's accurate in the way she's using the statement. A child has freedom from harm when their parent holds their hand to keep them from running into the street... and while the Aunts treat them like children, they hardly have their best interests at heart.


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