Indie Authors Monthly Magazine For Authors and Readers discussion

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Hey writers, what do you do when you get stuck in a funk?

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message 1: by Rachel Annie (last edited Aug 26, 2013 12:57PM) (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Whether it's writer's block to too many ideas bouncing around in your head, do you have any tips for a newbie?

What helps you when you read another author's work and think, "I'll never be this good." or "How the heck did this book get published and become hugely successful?"

Just looking for advice from people who've been there, or are there now.


message 2: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Kessler (lisakessler) Hi Rachel -

I jot down ideas in another document and then force myself to focus on the current book. It's hard work when you get toward the middle and infatuation with your book wears off, but you have to power through... Setting goals helps too... 1,000 words, then I can watch tv or work on another story or... :)

Hope that helps!

Lisa :)


message 3: by C.M.J. (new)

C.M.J. Wallace | 38 comments Hi, Rachel,

Here's what helps me when I wonder how tripe ever got published: throw the book across the room (I don't recommend this for electronic versions, though!).

If you think another writer is better than you are, they probably are, so try this: determine what makes you like their writing and try to emulate it. Was it the style, characterization, ability to evoke imagery? Part of improving your writing skills is practice, and that's an excellent way to do it.


message 4: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Lisa wrote: "I jot down ideas in another document and then force myself to focus on the current book. It's hard work when you get toward the middle and infatuation with your book wears off, but yo..."

I have such a problem with this! I do something similar, putting everything that comes to mind for future installments of the series into Microsoft OneNote on my laptop. I just wish I could stop drifting and stick with #1 to get it done. But you're right.

Must. Power. Through!


message 5: by Rosanna (new)

Rosanna Leo (rosanna_leo) Hi Rachel. I find it's crucial, when stuck, to take a little break away from the writing, whether it be an afternoon, or even writing something different for a change. Nothing helps writers' block like refreshing the old grey matter. When you've been staring at a WIP for ages, and the Muse suddenly disappears, you need to get out into the world and do something different, even out of your routine. At least, IMO. :)


message 6: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Kessler (lisakessler) Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Lisa wrote: "I jot down ideas in another document and then force myself to focus on the current book. It's hard work when you get toward the middle and infatuation with your book wears off, but yo...."

LOL You can do it!!! Daily goals with rewards for meeting your goals really helps... :) Good luck!

And keep writing!

Lisa :)


message 7: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) C.M.J. wrote: "Hi, Rachel,

Here's what helps me when I wonder how tripe ever got published: throw the book across the room (I don't recommend this for electronic versions, though!).

If you think another writer ..."


Lol! I know it shouldn't get to me; everybody's tastes are different. But sometimes I just wanna throw that book!


message 8: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Rosanna wrote: "Hi Rachel. I find it's crucial, when stuck, to take a little break away from the writing, whether it be an afternoon, or even writing something different for a change. Nothing helps writers' block ..."

Thanks for the tip, Rosanna! I do find the toughest part to be when I've just sat down and read back a bit. Then I just stare... It definitely helps to get up and maybe do a household chore or two and think on what to write next.


message 9: by Rosanna (new)

Rosanna Leo (rosanna_leo) Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Rosanna wrote: "Hi Rachel. I find it's crucial, when stuck, to take a little break away from the writing, whether it be an afternoon, or even writing something different for a change. Nothing helps..."

And when in doubt, just write, Rachel. It may feel like crap one day, but the next time you look at it, you might realize there are some gems in what you wrote. I just try to go with the flow, and the flow doesn't usually let me down. :)


message 10: by Curran (new)

Curran | 31 comments Boy can I relate. I get stuck in writing funks often. They sure can be frustrating. When I get in one, I try to sketch pictures either of characters or settings. Or instead of writing something that will be in the novel, I write like an extra or outtake. That way I don't feel pressure to be perfect with the wording, since I am not planning on it being included or read by others. However, often those free flowing thoughts turn out great and are integrated later on.

Thanks for this discussion and all the good advice from everyone else. Rachel, I hope these responses have helped you. Good luck to all of you with your own writing. :-)


message 11: by Rosanna (new)

Rosanna Leo (rosanna_leo) Curran wrote: "Boy can I relate. I get stuck in writing funks often. They sure can be frustrating. When I get in one, I try to sketch pictures either of characters or settings. Or instead of writing something tha..."

Good advice, too, Curran. Often it helps just to remove yourself from the WIP and write something slightly different like a character sketch.


message 12: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) I appreciate everyone's input! It also helps to know I'm not the only one that trips into those "What am I doing?" moments.


message 13: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Curran wrote: "Boy can I relate. I get stuck in writing funks often. They sure can be frustrating. When I get in one, I try to sketch pictures either of characters or settings. Or instead of writing something tha..."

Thanks for the tip, Curran! I hadn't thought of trying that.


message 14: by Andy (new)

Andy Elliott | 12 comments I have periods of writer's block on a frequent basis. Even though before I start a story I tend to write a rough plan on how the plot will pan out, and then flesh out the ideas in between as I write the numerous drafts. During these drafts the story sometimes changes direction in ways I didn't expect and I'll often find myself in a dead end story wise. In these instances I tend to walk away from my computer and go for a walk, listen to a music, and generally do anything else to clear my head.

So far I have always managed to sort out any plot conundrums I have created, or imagined a new twist in the story. The longest this has happened was about three months during my first book where I just couldn't figure out some aspects of motivation etc. When it finally came to me my fingers couldn't keep up with what my brain was coming up with.

For me the worse thing I can do is stare blankly at a screen or bit of paper.


message 15: by Curran (new)

Curran | 31 comments Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Curran wrote: "Boy can I relate. I get stuck in writing funks often. They sure can be frustrating. When I get in one, I try to sketch pictures either of characters or settings. Or instead of writin..."

your welcome. :-)


message 16: by Heather (new)

Heather Bowhay | 7 comments I take a break from writing and spend a little bit of time researching something. For example, I knew I was going to have an archery competition in one of the chapters, so I just researched different bow brand names, how to hold the bow correctly, and some of the correct terminology I'd want to be using. My husband is a bowhunter, and when he later read that two paragraph segment he was impressed and said I sounded like a professional archer.

Anyways, research keeps me working on my book while making forward progress - which makes me feel better while I try and get over writer's block.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

Usually for me, block means that the story has gone off the rails somewhere. I've lost focus, I'm wandering, I'm not staying true to the characters.

I try to backtrack, read over a few scenes, and see if I can figure out what needs to change. I may go back to the beginning and edit the first few chapters; I may go to the scene I'm in and outline the scene to figure out what the next "beat" is in the flow. For me, stepping back is the worst thing I can do; I have to power through and get to the other side.

I'm also not above leaving myself notes. [Somehow, Nor and Sebastian end this conversation and get to the car. Picking back up there] and write the next scene.


message 18: by A.L. (new)

A.L. Butcher (alb2012) | 266 comments List out notes, they may or may not become more than just notes. I also go and read, or do something else for a while. Eventually the story sorts itself out in my head.


message 19: by Heather (new)

Heather Heffner | 89 comments I don't know if I've mastered the too many ideas part myself. I really like using Scrivener, a graphic organizer/novel compiler tool to organize the overall book.

My process, however, is first to start writing (the beginning always comes easy), know the twist/shocker ending, and write down the random ideas/scenes I get from dreams, the world around me. I've had to jump up in the middle of the night before to write down a conversation between two characters b/c I knew I'd forget it by the morning.


message 20: by F.F. (new)

F.F. McCulligan | 26 comments I am a wilderness guide, and that means spending eight days at a time outside in all kinds of weather with teenagers who for the most part really don't want to be there and may be acting out or going through hell. There are definitely times when I just want to go home, or I feel that I'm in a guiding funk. But an expert guide told me "Just because you feel that way does not mean you are a bad guide, or even doing a bad job in that moment."

This relates to writing because you may think that because of your funk, the writing will not be good. The funk doesn't necessarily worsen your work, just your internal state.

When its only day two out of eight. There's nothing you can do except just power through.


message 21: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) F.F. wrote: "This relates to writing because you may think that because of your funk, the writing will not be good. The funk doesn't necessarily worsen your work, just your internal state..."

That's good advice, thank you!


message 22: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Does anybody here subscribe to Writer's Digest?

Was wondering if you've found it helpful.


message 23: by Kellie (new)

Kellie (kelliethacker_author) | 5 comments I tend to suffer from writer's fatigue where I feel like I've been writing forever and my brain is about to burn out. But one thing that keeps me going is music. I love music and I love putting music to what I write. So listening to songs that relate to what I'm writing gets me back into the groove. For example: right now I'm writing the third installment of my trilogy and the 'feel' of the book is surrounded with sorrow so I listen to songs that talk about depressing subjects but with a hopeful message. Worn by Tenth Avenue North is helping me out right now. Hope this helps.


message 24: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Kellie wrote: "I tend to suffer from writer's fatigue where I feel like I've been writing forever and my brain is about to burn out. But one thing that keeps me going is music. I love music and I love putting mus..."

Music helps me stay in the right frame of mind as well. ☺


message 25: by Judy (new)

Judy Goodwin | 33 comments Write every day, because writing is the only way to improve (practice makes perfect). You wouldn't expect to become an Olympic swimmer by just watching swimmers. You have to DO it. Yes, you can learn by reading others, both what works and what doesn't work. But above all, keep writing, keep finishing what you write. If this story isn't the best, don't worry. There are many more stories to come.

Keep a journal to put down your ideas. That way you don't lose them.

Personally I tend to work on multiple projects at once, so that if I'm bored with one I can move to another one. I also find that even if I don't feel like writing, what I produce on those days is just fine--and if it's a little clunky, there's always the edits.

Music helps me too--but I usually play it before I write rather than during.


message 26: by Kellie (new)

Kellie (kelliethacker_author) | 5 comments Judy, I can't listen to music while writing either lol. I tend to sing to the music and I get distracted from writing lol.


message 27: by Curran (new)

Curran | 31 comments Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Kellie wrote: "I tend to suffer from writer's fatigue where I feel like I've been writing forever and my brain is about to burn out. But one thing that keeps me going is music. I love music and I l..."

I can't write unless I have music on. I try to pick music that might mirror the state-of-mind, emotions of the characters I will be writing from. That helps me leave the real world and jump into the fictional one. good luck with your writing. :-)


message 28: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) I write to music as well, but if the song doesn't match the current mood of the story I get distracted.


message 29: by Baine (new)

Baine Kelly (BaineKelly) | 40 comments Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Whether it's writer's block to too many ideas bouncing around in your head, do you have any tips for a newbie?

What helps you when you read another author's work and think, "I'll never be this goo..."


I just posted about this on my facebook page. I always feel that I'm most creative in the evening, but it makes writing and getting sleep for my day job difficult. So when I'm looking for some inspiration, I'll setup the iTunes, turn it up and do some proof reading of my WIP. It will either get me in the mood to write, or fix some errors, either way it is a win, win!


message 30: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Vespia (cynv) | 13 comments Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Whether it's writer's block to too many ideas bouncing around in your head, do you have any tips for a newbie?

What helps you when you read another author's work and think, "I'll never be this goo..."


Hey Rachel, I think we all go through those doubts no matter where we are in our writing careers.

When I am plagued by self doubt I try to find inspirational quotes that I can relate to. Or other author's stories. Most of the time what seems to be "an overnight success" was actually years and years of hard work.

As they say "this too shall pass."
The only thing I can say when that sinking feeling hits me is that there is nothing else I'd rather be doing so I will continue to do it until I can do it no longer.

Here are a couple quotes to get you started (I have a whole journal full!)

Both of these happen to be from Million Dollar Baby because...well, it happened to be on TV recently!

"It's the magic of risking everything for a dream that nobody sees but you."

"Problem is, this the only thing I ever felt good doing. If I'm too old for this, then I got nothing. That enough truth to suit you?"


message 31: by Raymond (new)

Raymond Esposito | 3 comments I have the opposite of writers block- too many ideas. I use scrivener to add story ideas for the future. Usually while I am writing a novel ill write a few short stories to break up the process. It helps me put out the fire and stay more focused on the novel. Sort of like working out when you have a lot of stress or pent up energy.


message 32: by Elaina (last edited Oct 29, 2013 05:46AM) (new)

Elaina Roberts (emroberts) | 32 comments If I'm not on a deadline, self-imposed or otherwise, I tend to slack. "I'm stuck, I'll come back to it later." The problem there is I generally won't. Or won't for a while (like months). Or get distracted by something and start something new. I'm gearing up for NaNo, where writer's block of any form is simply not allowed due to time constraints. So, I'm forcing my way through it. Yes, it took me 12 hours once to write a 2000 word flash fiction, but I wrote it and it was just as good as the ones that flowed easily. So now? I'm trying to catch up on all those projects I put off because of waiting on "the mood" to strike.

So, I'll leave you with a blog post by an excellent writer on 'forcing art.' He's my kick in the pants any time I want to fall back on "I don't feel inspired." If you don't like profanity, um, don't click it. Chuck Wendig uses a profound amount of colorful metaphors.

http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/...


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

Whenever I'm stuck it's usual because I'm afraid, "I don't know where I'm going," moments. Honestly the cause of every bout of writer's block I've ever have. I generally just tell myself to get over it and keep writing.


message 34: by Lenore (new)

Lenore Sagaskie | 88 comments When I get stuck, it's usually because I have too many scenarios running through my brain. So I write them all and then take a break, usually by going out, working out, dancing, whatever feels like a good idea at the time. Then I look at all the scenarios, and keep the best two. Then I take it from there!


message 35: by L.G. (new)

L.G. Estrella | 23 comments I like to go for a walk, a jog, or some kind of other exercise. There's a certain clarity that only exhaustion can bring. When in doubt, I remind myself that it's only possible to fix a story that's been written. If I never write it down, then I can never improve it. Besides, there have been some truly atrocious books that have gone on to do pretty well for themselves.


message 36: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Thanks again everybody for your tips and suggestions. It's also helpful to know this stuff doesn't come easy to the majority of writers!


message 37: by Jim (new)

Jim Vuksic Sometimes the wisest course of action is to pull away from trying to write that elusive story for awhile.

Any activity will eventually wear you down if you do not occasionally take a break.

Give those ideas some time to ferment inside that brain of yours. You will know when it is time to get back to the old keyboard again.


message 38: by Bradley (new)

Bradley Poage | 13 comments I typically change gears and work on another story until I feel that block is gone. Sometimes working too hard will do it, and sometimes you happen to write yourself into an inescapable corner. It will workout once you find the exit.


message 39: by Edward (last edited Dec 24, 2013 12:25AM) (new)

Edward Wolfe (edwardmwolfe) Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Whether it's writer's block to too many ideas bouncing around in your head, do you have any tips for a newbie?

Writer's block - If nothing is coming to you for what you're trying to write, then don't try to write it. You might have some other idea that *will* flow if you change the channel.

You might skip to another, future chapter, or change to another character's viewpoint, or change to another work completely.

This is also a good time to put effort into other writerly duties such as editing, promoting, marketing, or just enjoying socializing with other writers.

Another good task is to lie down, close your eyes and let your mind clear. Part of a writer's job is to daydream and visualize. These things need space in your mind and if it's too cluttered in there with too many other thoughts, then it's good to clear out the space and make room for ideas.

This might also mean tending to some things that are bugging you, and lying down and seeing what's in your head could alert you to what it is that's blocking you.

Too many ideas - No such thing as being too wealthy with ideas. Write them all down. If that means opening a notepad document and writing down one-line plot summaries because the ideas are for multiple different projects, then write them all down. That clears space in your head and ensures you won't forget the brilliant ideas that you know you'll remember, but really might not.

If you have ideas for other stories and feel the need to start on one or more, give yourself permission to do that too. Some people feel it's important to discipline themselves and finish what they've started, and won't start anything else until then.

There are no rules in your writing world other than those that you choose because they work for you.

Feel free to start multiple stories. Create sub-folders in your Works In Progress folder for each one. The next time you feel that you have writer's block, go look in this folder. Your mind may have a flood of words just waiting for you to open the right document.

This gives you a Get Out of Writer's Block Free card.
When you write multiple things at once, the progress is slower on each one, which delays the satisfaction that comes from finishing a story, but you'll also find yourself finishing one work after another, giving you a cascading satisfaction.

"What helps you when you read another author's work and think, "I'll never be this good."

Realize that the author you're awed by didn't start off that good. He or she developed their craft and you will too, the same way they did - by writing, and by learning from your mistakes, listening to your critics, and writing, and re-writing, and lots of reading of better authors.

or "How the heck did this book get published and become hugely successful?"
"


You can learn from that too. There's something in that book that appealed to readers. Read that whole book and discover what it was that people love about it. Remember that thing, and if possible, use it when you can in your much better books.

It isn't always great writing that makes for success. Sometimes a poorly written book strikes a chord that resonates with a large percentage of the reading population.

When that happens, readers don't care about the delivery. It's the end result that mattered; the emotion, hope, excitement, inspiration, or whatever they're getting from it that overshadowed the less than polished method with which that feeling was invoked in them.

Sometimes though, there's no explaining it, and it will never make sense, and fortunately for us, it doesn't matter. Use it as another inspiration. "If something this bad can make millions, then I know I'm going to succeed because I'm a much better writer, and I know I can write a much better book."

View highly successful but badly written books as evidence that you too can and will succeed. How could you not?

:)


message 40: by Marlowe (new)

Marlowe Sr. (Ariindam Chakrabortiy) (mrmarlowe) | 11 comments Rachel ~ SnapDragoness wrote: "Whether it's writer's block to too many ideas bouncing around in your head, do you have any tips for a newbie?

What helps you when you read another author's work and think, "I'll never be this goo..."


It could just be my writing style but I split my book into 'scenes' and if I think I am unable to come up with enough ideas to write one scene (writer's block) I start writing the next, or the next one, whichever comes to my mind more easily. I can always re-arrange the scenes later on. Deferring it always helps, but I would rather WRITE something, even if it is another scene (than what I had intended originally), than just sit idle and waste time! ;)

In fact, now I make it a point to write a little bit everyday! You need to write often, even if not a lot. Even if all you can afford is to write ONE sentence, write it. I had this bad experience with Phantasy: I didn't write for months coz I was busy with my business, and then, when all of a sudden when I sat down to write, the words won't come to me! It was as though I had a HUGE stumbling block in front of me, and I was unable to find ways to get to the other side. I had to re-read everything I had written previously in order to get a grasp of the story. So with my 2nd book I try to keep a daily touch with my writing, no matter how little the output might be.


message 41: by Marlowe (last edited Dec 24, 2013 01:31AM) (new)

Marlowe Sr. (Ariindam Chakrabortiy) (mrmarlowe) | 11 comments Kellie wrote: "Judy, I can't listen to music while writing either lol. I tend to sing to the music and I get distracted from writing lol."

We got something in common, dear. But still I have this habit of not doing anything without some music, lol! ;)


message 42: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Thank you again guys for your tips and words of encouragement.

I hope others have found them to be helpful as well.


message 43: by Deidre (new)

Deidre Knight You know one of my best tricks? I either take a shower or lie down for a quick nap. These are short term solutions, obviously, but they help. I SWEAR that the hot shower somehow stimulates my brain. The nap puts my subconscious a bit more in the driver seat. Longer term? Sometimes working on a side project can loosen things up. Mostly, I just remember that some days are easier than others, but that writing just *isn't easy*. It's so much hard work, but the great days are what make it all worth it. Hope this helps.


message 44: by Rachel Annie (new)

Rachel Annie (snapdragoness) Deidre wrote: "The nap puts my subconscious a bit more in the driver seat..."

This is so true for me, too. I have to keep a notepad next to the bed for just that reason. Ideas seem to come more easily as I'm just about to fall asleep at night.

P.S. I've got Red Fire on my ever-increasing TBR Shelf. Look forward to (eventually) checking it out!


message 45: by Mara (new)

Mara Valderran (maravalderran) | 3 comments It's so interesting to see the many different takes on what to do with writers' block. It really drives home the point that writers have varying styles and processes. =)

When I have writers' block, it is generally something story-related for me as well. The characters have gone in an unexpected direction, or somehow I know that something has happened that doesn't make sense. Sitting back and ruminating on the story and the characters while listening to my soundtrack for the book and playing some mindless game (be it Mahjong or Facebook game) helps me. Though I do recommend keeping an eye on the time with that. I only give myself around 20 minutes before I head back, otherwise I might sit there for hours and end up plotting a whole other book in my head.

As for comparing, I think you should embrace the writer that you are while still being willing to grow in your craft. I am a far better story teller than I am writer. I know my strengths are characters and dialogue, and my biggest weakness is descriptions. That doesn't mean I never plan to change, but just that I recognize where I need to grow. Figure out the kind of writer you want to be, what feels natural to you. I love Terry Goodkind, but his style is completely different from mine. Recognizing that helped me a lot, because I'm bad about comparing myself to writers I idolize.

Great topic!


message 46: by Monique (new)

Monique Kovac Usually when I get writer's block, it's mostly because I start to veer off track. Then I get stuck and I find myself too stubborn to erase and continue again. So I end up giving up and taking time off even though I know I shouldn't...

Sometimes what gets me fresh ideas is re-reading what I've already written and then doing something else (like take my dog out, read a piece of a book, watch my shows). Usually being reminded where my story is going while simultaneously reminding myself what I do and don't like in other pieces gets me started again. Not sure if it's just effective for me, but It's worth a try. :)

And sort of like what Mara said above me (but not really haha), recognizing the style of the author you like is important so you can be re-inspired. Not copying the story or characters, but reminding yourself why your favorite books were your favorite.


message 47: by [deleted user] (new)

I agree with what Mara and Nikki said: to look at authors who have inspired you. Not to compare, because we are not all the same -- we could write about the same topic, and all have different stories -- but to remember why that person inspired you, and how, and run with it.

When I started out writing, I wrote a lot of fan fiction (please no groans!), and it helped me a lot, I think. Building off of someone's world, someone else's style, helped me to find my own. It was a proverbial writing playground, in a story I already liked, and in that way I became used to the "rules" of writing, and then I moved on to write my own things.

Whenever I come up with an idea, I collect as many things that remind me of it as possible, and put them on my writing desk for decoration. Not random things, but things that really strike me, concerning the story I'm working on. I even collect jewelry that reminds me of my story, and wear it when I'm typing. This helps me to stay inspired, because I'm literally surrounded by inspiration. It might be strange things that I collect -- right now I have a large Coca-Cola can from Christmas, one of the snowflake edition ones, on my desk -- but it never steers me wrong.

Another thing I do is mark passages in books, and revisit them when I'm feeling out of it. I light candles when I write, ones with invigorating scents, to wake my brain up, or I eat a mint, or drink my favorite tea. I also have certain films I watch when I'm in a writing depression (Lyrics of the Heart, Kiki's Delivery Service, and Thor are my go-to films). Plus, whatever or wherever I was when I initially had the idea, I revisit; often, this leads to re-watching TV episodes.

Something I think is important to keep in mind: if you're just starting out, give yourself room to grow. My writing style has changed so much over the years, from when I wrote my first book at 12 (over 10 years ago, now), and it continues to grow. I used to think my style would solidify itself, and then I'd just keep writing, but writing is like a plant -- you have to nurture it, and keep feeding it, and it changes. Just keep practicing and fine-tuning your craft. Not everything you're going to write will be perfect, and maybe five, ten, or even two years from now you'll think the writing is immature, or not as good as it could be, but you'll still love the story you wrote.

I find the best thing to do is keep moving forward! There is always something new to create. :)


message 48: by N.D. (new)

N.D. Taylor (ndtaylor) Take a break and write something else! Suddenly I feel inspired again and the writing comes so much easier.

I also like to take a break to workout. Pushups. Weight lifting. A video game. Something else distracting.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

N.D. wrote: "Take a break and write something else! Suddenly I feel inspired again and the writing comes so much easier.

I also like to take a break to workout. Pushups. Weight lifting. A video game. Something..."


I think any type of physical activity is good, and it's always nice to get away from the computer. I like to take walks and do yoga.


message 50: by Jordan (new)

Jordan Bernal | 1 comments I'll pop in my ear buds with some music and take a walk. Just clearing my head of the pressure to write usually helps.

When I'm really in a funk, I'll take an old-fashioned paper notebook and change writing locations (the beach if weather permits) and just write whatever comes to mind. Usually it has nothing to do with my current storyline, but I do get ideas of emotions for characters this way.


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