Literary Horror discussion

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message 1: by Randolph (last edited Aug 23, 2013 06:16PM) (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments A place for new (or existing) members to introduce themselves.


message 2: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 247 comments Hi, I've only just joined so I'll do the honours and introduce myself. I'm a British reader and writer of speculative fiction and poetry and I like my spec fic dark and literary.


message 3: by Frances (new)

Frances Hey! I joined a while back, but then life away from my keyboard exploded. I'm a Canadian reader, longtime lover of horror.


message 4: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments C'mon you slugs! Introduce yourself when you join. Didn't your Mama bring you up right?


message 5: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Jodi wrote: "She did, but I was always the rebellious one. :)

I got into horror a little late in life. Probably about fifteen years or so ago. I prefer dark and subtle weird tales/spec fiction. I'm a writer, m..."


Welcome Jodi!


message 6: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Uminsky (benjaminu) | 340 comments Hello and thank you Randolph for starting this up. I enjoy literature of all kinds, particularly in the genre of weird fiction. I am always on the look out for new authors and publishers that are able to write high quality stuff in this genre.

I also love collecting books, particularly published by small presses like Ex Occidente, Tartarus, Centipede, etc.


message 7: by Andrew (new)

Andrew I started reading "horror" (which I don't think is an entirely fitting label) when I first discovered Stephen King in college, and devoured "The Stand" in less than a week. I've been a HUGE King fan ever since, and still haven't read everything he's written. :-) I've branched out, however, and am currently reading a lot of lesser-known 19th century Gothic fiction as well as working my way through the complete stories of HP Lovecraft. I'm also an ordained minister, occasional teacher of theology at the college level in various international contexts, and am working toward a PhD in church history dealing with Constantine and 4th cent. Christianity.


message 8: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Andrew wrote: "I started reading "horror" (which I don't think is an entirely fitting label) when I first discovered Stephen King in college, and devoured "The Stand" in less than a week. I've been a HUGE King fa..."

Welcome Benjamin and Andrew. Don't get me started on genre labels...


message 9: by Teddy (new)

Teddy G (teddy-g) | 51 comments Hello my name is Teddy, I'm 28 from Israel. I've always loved horror. My father used to tell us stories from the Greek mythology in all their gory details, my mother had me read strange scary books unfit for children, and my older brother set me on Lovecraft at an early age. I discovered Robert Aickman 6 years ago (which was a big event in my life). I try to read diverse genres but I always come back to horror. I also write and illustrate comics in Hebrew, somewhat influenced by horror.


message 10: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Welcome Teddy! Looks like you have some interesting perspectives to add. I also introduced my children to horror a little too early but they don't seem scarred by it.


message 11: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Whoo Hoo we passed 50 members! "The thousand mile journey starts with a single step."


message 12: by Andrew (new)

Andrew I just started reading The Monk a couple of weeks ago, trying to get a head-start on it for discussion group on this website running through September.


message 13: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Has anyone read Uncle Silas by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu? I always like Le Fanu's ghost stories.


message 14: by Andrew (new)

Andrew I saw a trailer for a movie about it as well. I wish film-makers would leave books alone, and come up with their own stories. Still, the film looked pretty interesting. It will likely focus on all the salacious details in a way the novel probably does not, but what do I know?


message 15: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 247 comments Andrew wrote: "I saw a trailer for a movie about it as well. I wish film-makers would leave books alone, and come up with their own stories. Still, the film looked pretty interesting. It will likely focus on all ..."
The novel was pretty salacious for it's time!


message 16: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Alright we passed 60 members (I know, big deal)! You must all be wallflowers out there 'cause I ain't seen nobody introduce themselves. (I live in South Carolina).


message 17: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Michael wrote: "happy to be one of the 60"
Welcome Michael!


message 18: by Canavan (new)

Canavan A relatively new user of Goodreads, but a long-time reader in the horror/supernatural field. Within the genre, I have a tendency to gravitate towards “quiet” horror, but I do try to be at least a bit diverse in my reading choices.

Looks like a nice place here; hope I can contribute.


message 19: by Char (last edited Oct 30, 2013 01:45PM) (new)

Char Hi, Canavan!


message 20: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 551 comments Hello Caravan:

If you are interested in "quiet horror", here are two writers I suggest: Robert Aickman and Simon Strantzas. Both have excellent prose styles, and are masters of the uncanny tale.


message 21: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Your mod should be back to full connection by WEDNESDAY. Weather improved mightily but still have the 1000 mile caravan ahead tomorrow.


message 22: by Canavan (new)

Canavan Ronald wrote:

If you are interested in "quiet horror", here are two writers I suggest: Robert Aickman and Simon Strantzas. Both have excellent prose styles, and are masters of the uncanny tale.

Thanks so much for the tips, Ronald. I have two of Simon’s collections, Beneath The Surface and Cold to the Touch and have generally been impressed by their contents. (I haven’t yet gotten around to reading Nightingale Songs .)

I’m almost afraid to admit this, but I have a bit of a problematic relationship with Aickman. I read quite a few of his “strange tales” back in the late 70’s and have revisited a few of them from time to time, but I find I have to really push myself to do so and have to be in the right frame of mind (if that makes any sense). His stories are, I find, not quick and easy reads and trying to fully grasp the author’s intentions is sorta like trying to grab hold of smoke.


message 23: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Happy All Hallows Eve!


message 24: by Karen (new)

Karen | 1 comments Happy Samhain all. I'm in rainy Toronto. I'm reading Edogawa Rampo's (If you say his name out loud you can hear his tribute to Poe) Japanese Tales of Mystery and Imagination. Written in 1956 they are a fun and spooky read. Thought I'd share that with everyone.


message 25: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Ronald wrote: "Hello Caravan:

If you are interested in "quiet horror", here are two writers I suggest: Robert Aickman and Simon Strantzas. Both have excellent prose styles, and are masters of the uncanny tale."


I have always considered Charles L. Grant to be the master of quiet horror. He isn't enigmatic like some perhaps more literary purveyors of the horror genre but to me he is the ideal Halloween read.


message 26: by Scott (new)

Scott Randolph wrote: "I have always considered Charles L. Grant to be the master of quiet horror. He isn't enigmatic like some perhaps more literary purveyors of the horror genre but to me he is the ideal Halloween read."

Agreed. I read Dialing the Wind last year and it was perfect.


message 27: by Scott (new)

Scott Karen wrote: "Happy Samhain all. I'm in rainy Toronto. I'm reading Edogawa Rampo's (If you say his name out loud you can hear his tribute to Poe) Japanese Tales of Mystery and Imagination. Written in 1956 they a..."

Hi Karen. I have that book and really should read it soon.


message 28: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Now all we have to look forward to is Walpurgisnacht.


message 29: by J.S. (last edited Nov 02, 2013 12:31PM) (new)

J.S. Watts | 247 comments Randolph wrote: "Now all we have to look forward to is Walpurgisnacht."

At least in 2012 there was the possibility of an end of the world apocalypse.


message 30: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments I guess if you are in the UK there is Guy Fawkes (I'm too lazy to look up the date) but that always seemed like an inferior macabre holiday since all the Gunpowder Plot conspirators wanted to do was what we all would like to do, blow up the government and establish anarchy. It wasn't like they wanted to call up the Great Old Ones or something important like that.


message 31: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 247 comments Randolph wrote: "I guess if you are in the UK there is Guy Fawkes (I'm too lazy to look up the date) but that always seemed like an inferior macabre holiday since all the Gunpowder Plot conspirators wanted to do wa..."

It's November 5th, but as it's the weekend the fireworks have already started. If it helps, the executions of the conspirators were pretty grisly.


message 32: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments J.S. wrote: "Randolph wrote: "I guess if you are in the UK there is Guy Fawkes (I'm too lazy to look up the date) but that always seemed like an inferior macabre holiday since all the Gunpowder Plot conspirator..."

There is nothing like a good burning at the stake to whip up some rumor of haunts and such. I was always a big fan of the Gordon Riots as Lord Gordon turned out either to be possessed by demons or perhaps just mad as a March hare.


message 33: by Karl (new)

Karl Hello, I'm Karl, It's nice to read your posts to this site. I enjoy collecting books, and some of these small press creations are a joy to own and hold. My current obsession authors are R.B. Russell, Reggie Oliver, Mark Valentine, Rhys Hughes, and Brendan Connell


message 34: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Karl wrote: "Hello, I'm Karl, It's nice to read your posts to this site. I enjoy collecting books, and some of these small press creations are a joy to own and hold. My current obsession authors are R.B. Russe..."

Welcome Karl!

These are all fine authors. Ray Russell is also a really nice guy at Tartarus Press. I've even had some conversations with him about some genealogical esoterica.


message 35: by Karl (new)

Karl Randolph wrote: "Karl wrote: "Hello, I'm Karl, It's nice to read your posts to this site. I enjoy collecting books, and some of these small press creations are a joy to own and hold. My current obsession authors a..."

Have you seen Mr. Russell's tour of his library and views on collecting books on youtube ?

A Mild Case of Bibliomania

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h7-aI...


message 36: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Karl wrote: "Randolph wrote: "Karl wrote: "Hello, I'm Karl, It's nice to read your posts to this site. I enjoy collecting books, and some of these small press creations are a joy to own and hold. My current ob..."

Yes, I follow Mr. Russell on YouTube.


message 37: by Scott (new)

Scott That is a great video.


message 38: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Well we've made ninety members. Let's shoot for 100! We'll never be a Horror Aficionados or Literary Darkness but we do have a few real very good authors in the group and lots of literate members.


message 39: by Scott (new)

Scott Maybe if we had more game threads.


message 40: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Scott wrote: "Maybe if we had more game threads."

Or a Death Watch thread;(


message 41: by Char (new)

Char Hello and welcome, Karl!


message 42: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Uminsky (benjaminu) | 340 comments Karl wrote: "Randolph wrote: "Karl wrote: "Hello, I'm Karl, It's nice to read your posts to this site. I enjoy collecting books, and some of these small press creations are a joy to own and hold. My current ob..."

I love this video. My library pales in comparison. But... still, one can aspire...


message 43: by Karl (new)

Karl Charlene wrote: "Hello and welcome, Karl!"

Hello, Glad to have found my way here, I went to your blog, and I must say that I love the picture of your Library.


message 44: by Karl (new)

Karl Benjamin wrote: "Karl wrote: "Randolph wrote: "Karl wrote: "Hello, I'm Karl, It's nice to read your posts to this site. I enjoy collecting books, and some of these small press creations are a joy to own and hold. ..."
The Reggie Oliver and Mark Valentine Library tours are well worth seeing also.


message 45: by Randolph (last edited Nov 17, 2013 02:07PM) (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments My library is a disaster. It consists of piles and boxes of books in every imaginable place in the house. A picture of it would remind you of a homeless person with a library in a cardboard box. There is only one room that is half way sane and that is only because I've shoved everything into corners.

One of my daughters is an English/Japanese/Computer Science major in college and her room is probably the worst since she insists on keeping all my discards and anything I want to sell. She calls it her inheritance.

Don't even mention the vinyl records, CDs, and DVDs.


message 46: by Char (new)

Char LOL, Thanks, Karl! I truly do wish I lived in that library. :)


message 47: by Char (new)

Char Randolph, at least you have one. I do have a spare room that I could turn into one, but I would rather be reading. :)


message 48: by Karl (new)

Karl Randolph wrote: "My library is a disaster. It consists of piles and boxes of books in every imaginable place in the house. A picture of it would remind you of a homeless person with a library in a cardboard box. ..."

I shudder even to think this, however, I had a problem a number of years ago ... beware of Termites, they can come through the walls and reek havoc, They appear to have enjoyed my Harlan Ellison books most fervently.


message 49: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 39 comments Karl wrote: "Randolph wrote: "My library is a disaster. It consists of piles and boxes of books in every imaginable place in the house. A picture of it would remind you of a homeless person with a library in ..."

Living in the humid South, like almost everyone here that can afford it, I have my entire house treated for termites quarterly, an annual inspection, and a termite replacement clause in my insurance. It's not a matter of if, it's when you get termites here. Any piece of wood, including treated wood other than creosote, that touches the ground becomes infested eventually. I have all metal studs in my house for just this reason.


message 50: by Karl (new)

Karl Randolph wrote: "Karl wrote: "Randolph wrote: "My library is a disaster. It consists of piles and boxes of books in every imaginable place in the house. A picture of it would remind you of a homeless person with ..."

You are a wise man. The vermin are bigger book lovers than we are.


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