Ask Joyce Maynard - Friday, September 20th! discussion

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message 1: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Shannon  (cincindypat) Welcome to the group! Joyce will be answering questions throughout the day on Friday, September 20th in this thread only. In the meantime if you have a question for Joyce or just want to introduce yourself feel free to do so in this thread.


message 2: by Rob (new)

Rob (eighte1) | 1 comments Hi, Joyce. I'm curious about the process you go through in writing and revising your work. Are you a meticulous first-draft writer, or do you just try to get your ideas on the page? How many revisions do you typically go through before you have a manuscript you're sufficiently satisfied with, to show to others (your editor, other readers, etc.)?


message 3: by Claudine (new)

Claudine Wolk (claudinewolk) | 2 comments Hi Joyce, I really enjoyed After Her. I was curious about two things: Did the My Sharona song really have the hidden meanings that you bring up in the book? If that was common knowledge, I missed it growing up...gosh, I loved that song. And two, why do you think it was so easy for the Father to speak to the Mother (and become good friends) AFTER they were separated?


message 4: by Cathie (new)

Cathie (catitude) Hi Joyce. You just met my son at a publisher's event up here in Toronto and he got you to sign a copy of your book. I wanted to say Thank you in your genoristy of taking the time and the effort you put in to personalize it for him/me:-).

(You wrote that I have a thoughtful son and that you have 2). You also drew a rad sketch of yourself, lol!

So, this is a question thread: Which, of all of your books, was the hardest to pen and why?


message 5: by Hi (new)

Hi | 1 comments was writing your first book "looking back" difficult to write because of your young age? how did you get published so darn early? also, could you tell us more about your life in the 60s?


message 6: by Cara (new)

Cara Achterberg (caraachterberg) I absolutely love your writing. Your characters are so real to me and I enjoy how lyrical your prose is. I'm curious whether you follow a particular structure or use an outline before beginning each novel.


message 7: by Pam (new)

Pam Small | 1 comments Have read your latest book (as I have those before it); am glad to be part of this book discussion, because there was one burning question I kept wondering: why don't we learn more about the mother? We know that she was home with the girls, but not available (in her bedrm alot), yet she was available to Tony during those late night talks. Was this a conscious choice?


message 8: by Tara (new)

Tara | 1 comments Hi,Joyce,I have enjoyed reading your novels as well as seeing the film versions of them such as To Die For and the upcoming Labor Day. Are there plans for After Her to become a movie as well?


message 9: by Ann (new)

Ann (aallsopp) | 2 comments Hi, Joyce! One of the things I love about your writing is the pacing--you're able to discuss characters doing day-to-day things without rushing off to the next bit of "action," but those casual moments actually build the characters and tension (sneaky, sneaky). Here's my question: How do you get away from chaos in your own daily life and find that pace? Is it ever hard to slow down, or does it come naturally to you?


message 10: by Elyse (last edited Sep 11, 2013 02:55PM) (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) I was deeply emotionally invested in the story 'Labor Day'...
Then again in, "The Good Daughters". (I've a desire to read more books by you).
I love your writing, your stories, your heart, your passion, your compassion!
I'm moved by the things I've read about you. (raising your kids --then adopting kids again later in life).
A friend told me about your writing workshops --(I just kept thinking how wonderful it must be ---if YOU were leading it).

Do you 'ever' have writing workshop days in the Bay Area (for 61 year old farts like me) ---with no 'real' interest in serious writing ---but just for pure 'fun'?
Have you had requests to lead a local -Bay Area- retreat day? Think it might be something you would enjoy? Teach 61 year old farts like me a little writing? for pure 'fun'? --Most--I'd enjoy hearing you share about your books -your life -things which move 'you'!

I think you're soooooo GREAT!!!!!


message 11: by Ti (new)

Ti (bookchatter) | 3 comments Hello!! I just finished After Her and what struck me, is the genuine closeness of the two sisters in the book. Their fierce love of one another is something that still resonates with me and I finished the book awhile ago.

What I'd like to know, is if you have any brothers or sisters of your own, and if your childhood experiences were reflected in the characters as well.


message 12: by Billur (new)

Billur | 1 comments Hi joyce.. First of all sorry for my english, because i am from turkey..but i thing it will be enough to describe my feelingss.. When i get this invitation, i get so very suprised and appreciated to write something bevause this isy first time that writing to a famous writer..
I just read the good daughters,(& will read the rest of your books if i can dind them all in my country ) it was reaally georgeous.. But this is my question that; ( but my queation is so very general i know!:) but i always wonder about it ) The original books name and the result of translations book name have really different meaning.. Why this is happening when you read a different language book also this is for movies too.. Also want to share this too, in turkish, when you translate your books name "the good daughters" is "the strawberry girls" ...i know this word is part of the book but who decides to change the meaning.. Or are they getting any permission from you to do that?
Thanks for reading.. İf you cant understand what i mean, be sure that it is not your cause, bec. Of me :) love from turkey!


message 13: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) such beautiful comments --& questions --

I can't to read "After Her". You sure make it sound good, *Ti*! (I just ordered it from Amazon).

Does anyone know where to find the movie 'Labor Day' in the U.S.?


message 14: by Kathleen (last edited Sep 11, 2013 07:30PM) (new)

Kathleen (Jogger1) | 1 comments Joyce,
I fell in love with the father Anthony in After Her- I'm wondering if you ever fall in love with your characters. Also, are the sisters in real life as close as your characters in the book. I longed for a sister for the first time ever while reading this story and I find myself still thinking about those girls. Loved this book! I reccommend to all your readers to watch the story behind the book video on youtube.


message 15: by Kim (new)

Kim | 2 comments Hi Joyce, Looking forward to reading your new book (just purchased) and I really enjoyed At Home in the World-you and I are probably the same age and I related very much to the cultural references in the book along with the story you shared.

Have you ever thought of writing a book set in Guatemala (or did I miss one and you already did?)?

Kim


message 16: by Ti (new)

Ti (bookchatter) | 3 comments Elyse wrote: "such beautiful comments --& questions --

I can't to read "After Her". You sure make it sound good, *Ti*! (I just ordered it from Amazon).

Does anyone know where to find the movie 'Labor Day' in t..."



Labor Day, according to IMDb does not come out until January 2014!


message 17: by Amy (new)

Amy Selwyn (amyselwyn) | 2 comments Elyse wrote: "such beautiful comments --& questions --

I can't to read "After Her". You sure make it sound good, *Ti*! (I just ordered it from Amazon).

Does anyone know where to find the movie 'Labor Day' in t..."


It will open in December. Right now it's just playing at film festivals, like Telluride.


message 18: by Amy (new)

Amy Selwyn (amyselwyn) | 2 comments Really enjoyed "After Her" and loved your memoir, "At Home in the World". Such a brave book. A question re: your most recent book in particular. You used the story of the murderer, the detective and the two sisters as your real-life starting point. Did you discuss with the two sisters how you were planning to "alter" the true story for fiction or did it just happen as the characters revealed themselves to you?


message 19: by Chrissi (new)

Chrissi Sepe | 2 comments Hi Joyce, I'm Chrissi and I'm a novelist too. I first read your book "At Home in the World," then picked it up again recently, around the time I published my own first novel. I really enjoyed your book and it has left a lasting impression on me all these years (which is why I picked it up again). I admire your honesty, and I feel a connection to you as a female writer and just a female in general who is open and honest about the female experience we share in this life. My question is, which female writers have you been inspired by most and have you ever read either of my favorite writers: Banana Yoshimoto and Anais Nin (her diaries, in particular)?


message 20: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) Amy wrote: "Elyse wrote: "such beautiful comments --& questions --

I can't to read "After Her". You sure make it sound good, *Ti*! (I just ordered it from Amazon).

Does anyone know where to find the movie 'L..."



message 21: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) Thank you, Amy! ---
I also saw your next post. :) All of Joyce's books sound great!


message 22: by Cathie (new)

Cathie (catitude) Labor Day, the movie, just had it's premiere gala here at TIFF, The Toronto International Film Festival. It was very well received :-) (Many films from previous TIFF years have gone on to win the major Oscars at the Academy Awards)


message 23: by Elyse (last edited Sep 15, 2013 09:44AM) (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) *Cathie*: I just came back from a walk (with my first new smart phone of my 'life' --frustrated as can be with my Galaxy S4 --(knowing just about nothing in today's fast world and 'smart-anythings') --lol, but I was thinking about the book "Labor Day" and how much I enjoyed it -and how much I admire Joyce Maynard --(a woman of richness -with such interesting stories to tell(fiction and non-fiction) --,
Most movies which are released (here in the U.S. in DECEMBER) --as *Amy* tells us --usually are considered to be Oscar Quality here too!


message 24: by Kim (last edited Sep 18, 2013 08:12AM) (new)

Kim | 2 comments I'm also keeping up with your reflections on the responses you're getting from women in regard to your essay on Salinger and you relationship with him. Very important discussion and I appreciate your raising this issue and sharing your thoughts on it.


message 25: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) I just started the book "After Her" (Joyce's new book), early this morning. I LOVE IT! (I grew up in Oakland/Berkeley --I'm 63 years old --I know the Bay Area well....plus, its my generation. (such a treat reading the way Joyce describes places I have experience with myself). I wish I could keep reading today ---but I'm almost out the door for along day and evening --
Here is where I left off: (wonderful)....
"It was the place we found out about everything, that mountain. Animal bones and deer scat. Birds, flowers, condoms. The bodies of dead animals, bodies of men. Rocks and lizards. Sex and death.


message 26: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Hello, Elyse. As a writer, one of the things I always wish is that I could SEE a reader reading one of my books. (That's one reason why I love to give readings. ) So it's a particular pleasure hearing this from you. The line you quoted is a favorite of mine, too. I feel I can say this without being full of myself because, honestly, it feels as if the one who wrote it was the character of Rachel, more than me.


message 27: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Rob wrote: "Hi, Joyce. I'm curious about the process you go through in writing and revising your work. Are you a meticulous first-draft writer, or do you just try to get your ideas on the page? How many rev..."

Hello Rob. Depends on the novel. My novel , Labor Day, seemed to come out in a single breath. I wrote it in twelve days and changed very little after that, and it felt almost as if I were taking dictation from my narrator, the thirteen year old boy. But writing After Her was a much longer process. It took me almost two years. Not so much because I was revising the writing, as because the story and the plot required so much thought.


Cynthia wrote: "Welcome to the group! Joyce will be answering questions throughout the day on Friday, September 20th in this thread only. In the meantime if you have a question for Joyce or just want to introduce ..."


message 28: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Claudine wrote: "Hi Joyce, I really enjoyed After Her. I was curious about two things: Did the My Sharona song really have the hidden meanings that you bring up in the book? If that was common knowledge, I misse..."

Hi Claudine. When I'm writing a novel, I like to choose music to play as I write (or BEFORE my writing day begins) to get me in the mood for my story, and since this novel begins in the summer of 1979, I decided to seek out music my characters would have listened to . That summer , My Sharona was #1.

Now, I never really thought much about the lyrics of My Sharona until I revisited the song when I was writing the novel. I was a little surprised , myself, at how sexual it felt. There's something driving, obsessed, hungry about those lyrics that seemed to conjure the mood I was looking for.

I will tell you a story about the song. Early on in my writing, I had included lyrics in my novel, but my editor suggested that I take them out, because purchasing the rights to quote the lyrics would be prohibitively expensive. I kept on resisting taking out those lyrics. They just BELONGED there.

Meanwhile, I had gone away for the winter, to write, and rented out my house. (This house sits on Mt. Tamalpais, by the way. The setting for my novel). The man who'd rented my house turned out to be a musician. It was the day I was supposed to take out the song lyrics, but I was standing in my kitchen with my tenant and we got to talking about music, and I asked him what kind of music he played and if he'd played with anyone I might have heard of . He said "Well, I sometimes played with The Knack." Meaning, the band responsible for My Sharona.

"Did you know Doug Fieger?" I asked him. (This was the band's lead singer, who died a couple of years earlier. Way too young.)

"He died in my arms," said my tenant. "I'm having dinner with his sister tomorrow night."

So he put me in touch with Doug Fieger's sister, and with Berton Averre, the lead guitarist for the band. I wrote them a letter about my novel, and why the song mattered so much. And they let me use it in After Her.

It's a wonderful song. Simple and unforgettable. And it brings you right back to 1979.



Rob wrote: "Hi, Joyce. I'm curious about the process you go through in writing and revising your work. Are you a meticulous first-draft writer, or do you just try to get your ideas on the page? How many rev..."


message 29: by Cathie (new)

Cathie (catitude) Joyce, My Sharona story. Serendipity! :-). There are no such things as coincedences :-). Love this background story, thank you for sharing it :-)


message 30: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Cathie wrote: "Hi Joyce. You just met my son at a publisher's event up here in Toronto and he got you to sign a copy of your book. I wanted to say Thank you in your genoristy of taking the time and the effort y..."

Hi , Cathie. Different books of mine have presented different kinds of challenges. After Her, for instance, had the most complex STORY of any novel I've written. It took me months of waking up in hte middle of the night and pacing around , standing out on my deck looking at the mountain, to figure out how my two young girl characters, Rachel and Patty--who I came to love--would get out of that confrontation with the killer on the mountain. (I knew I didn't want some big strong man with a gun to come along to rescue them. I wanted them to save themselves. And when I finally came up with my solution--which was inspired by a game the two real sisters actually used to play, by the way--I just burst out laughing, it felt so funny, and so perfectly like what those two would actually have done.

But the hardest book to write--emotionally--was definitely my memoir, At Home in the World. It tells a painful story from my own young years--one I have been much criticized for telling. I'm deeply proud of At Home in the World , and it has just been re-released , with a new preface by me. I think readers of my novels would like this one a lot, and hope you take a look.

(And say hello to your son for me!)


message 31: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Hi wrote: "was writing your first book "looking back" difficult to write because of your young age? how did you get published so darn early? also, could you tell us more about your life in the 60s?"

Well, to understand how I wrote that book so young (I was 18) you'd have to know about the family I grew up in. We didn't play sports. We didn't take vacations to Disneyland, or anyplace else for that matter. We WROTE. From the age of three or four, even before I could physically write, I was making up stories and my mother was typing them. and then....EDITING. I've worked with some brilliant editors in my 40 years as a writer, but none to equal my mother.

This was a pretty high pressured way to grow up. But it definitely made me a writer. I was submitting my stories to Seventeen Magazine from around age 13. And at 17, I wrote a letter to the New York Times, suggesting that I should write for them. Interestingly, the editor in chief wrote back and gave me an assignment. That led to my first book.

I did NOT replicate this kind of training with my own three kids, by the way. And I do not recommend it, though I am grateful to my parents for giving me the tools to do something I love.

You can read the story in At Home in the World. And I hope you do.


message 32: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Cordelia wrote: "Good evening, Joyce.

I really enjoyed reading Labor Day. I loved the 1980s setting in it and I just loved reading every minute of it. My question for you is were you surprised that a book you writ..."


Well, Cordelia, of course I was very happy the book was made into a movie, and even happier when I got to see the movie recently, and saw what a great job the director and cast have done bringing my novel to life. In one way, it wasn't surprising, because when I was writing Labor Day, it almost felt as though I was describing a movie I saw in my head already. Jason Reitman (the director) just made it real. Beautifully. I've seen the movie three times now, and I 've cried every time.

Labor Day opens on Christmas Day . The character of Adele will be played by Kate Winslet. The convict on the run is Josh Brolin. The way he makes pie in the movie is the way I make my pie. No coincidence there. I flew to the set and taught Josh how.


message 33: by Cathie (last edited Sep 19, 2013 06:57AM) (new)

Cathie (catitude) Joyce, I will revisit At Home in the World: A Memoir At Home in the World A Memoir by Joyce Maynard and I will definitely say hello to my son for you. Thank you.


message 34: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Cara wrote: "I absolutely love your writing. Your characters are so real to me and I enjoy how lyrical your prose is. I'm curious whether you follow a particular structure or use an outline before beginning eac..."

Many of my good friends who are writers DO outline their novels, Cara--or plan them out in a very detailed way. I don't. I like to create believable characters, put them in a situation, and see what they're going to do. I think I generally write pretty fast because I can't wait to find out, myself, what's going to happen. This is the truth.


message 35: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Pam wrote: "Have read your latest book (as I have those before it); am glad to be part of this book discussion, because there was one burning question I kept wondering: why don't we learn more about the moth..."

The mother is a fascinating character to me. You know they tell us to write about what we know, but in this case, I wanted to write about what I did NOT know. My own mother was a brilliant, inspiring, deeply loving woman who was so involved in my life that it sometimes seemed no boundaries existed between us. This was not a good thing, by the way--though not an uncommon one.

When I met Laura and Janet, the real sisters whose story inspired my novel, it was so clear that their own experience of growing up had been entirely different from mine in nearly every way. Their mother is not the mother in my novel. But one part that is has to do with the way their mother let them discover, for themselves, who they were and what they might want to become. Theirs was a childhood--like that of my characters, Patty and Rachel--with surprisingly little parental intervention. (One of the real sisters calls their experience "a Charlie Brown childhood"--meaning, parents not much in evidence, if at all.)

It's easy to view this as neglectful. And certainly, the characters in my novel get into some big trouble as a result. But they also possess this wonderful courage and sense of themselves, that took me a few more decades to acquire.

I will add here , though I don't say this outright in After Her, that the mother in the novel is proably suffering from clinical depression. People didn't talk about that in those days. But even in her sadness, the mother did something very wise: she let her daughters discover themselves.

There's a place near the end of the novel where Rachel bikes past a tennis court at a country club, where she watches a group of girls around her age, whose mothers are all over them--carrying their rackets, taking care of their water bottles, planning the next event in their lives. And she feels this sudden rush of love for her own mother, back home holed up with her library books, that she wasn't a mother like those women, though she so often longed for one like that.

This is what I believe too.


message 36: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Tara wrote: "Hi,Joyce,I have enjoyed reading your novels as well as seeing the film versions of them such as To Die For and the upcoming Labor Day. Are there plans for After Her to become a movie as well?"

I think After Her would make a terrific movie, Tara. No plans yet, but let's hope. (My novel The Usual Rules just got optioned for a film by the way. )


message 37: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Ann wrote: "Hi, Joyce! One of the things I love about your writing is the pacing--you're able to discuss characters doing day-to-day things without rushing off to the next bit of "action," but those casual mom..."

Oh, Ann. You've identified a central issue in my writing life. I am always so interested in what's going on in the world it's hard to remove myself long enough to write.

Sometimes I do this by just leaving home , renting a little cabin somewhere and holing up all by myself. A number of times in recent years I've been lucky enough to be accepted for an artist's residency (in NH--where I wrote Labor Day, in Wyoming--where I wrote The Good Daughters, and in Virginia--where I started After Her.

And I have a house on a lake in Guatemala where I go to write. (And once a year, I teach writing there for a week, to students who come to work with me on their own work. You can learn about this on my website, by the way. www.joycemaynard.com


message 38: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Elyse wrote: "I was deeply emotionally invested in the story 'Labor Day'...
Then again in, "The Good Daughters". (I've a desire to read more books by you).
I love your writing, your stories, your heart, your pa..."


I do sometimes teach in the Bay area, Elyse. Nothing scheduled at the moment, but there probably will be soon, and if you register your email address at my website (www.joycemaynard.com) you'll receive an announcement next time it happens. And just so you know, NONE of my workshops , including the week at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala every winter, and in Maine in the summers, and at my bay area home, is designed just for longtime writers with professional aspirations. I love to work with writers of all levels. (Always on memoir . I like to begin with the story you know better than anyone.)
And if you are an old fart, so am I. I will turn 60 in November. But I don't feel like an old fart so i bet you aren't one either.


message 39: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Ti wrote: "Hello!! I just finished After Her and what struck me, is the genuine closeness of the two sisters in the book. Their fierce love of one another is something that still resonates with me and I finis..."

Hi Ti

I'm the younger of two sisters. We love each other a lot, but have never been close like the two sisters in my novel (who are based on two real women, as you may know.)

I chose to write about the sister relationship here specifically because what these two sisters have struck me as so moving and beautiful--and rare. I wanted to get to live with that for a while,and every day when I got up and started writing about these two girls, it was as if I got to know their lives for a while. I loved that part of After Her.

My own sister, Rona Maynard, is also a writer, in Canada. You can read an interesting article we published together in MORE magazine a few years back about our relationship. We were each asked tow write about our sister. Writing this --and reading what my sister had to say --actually brought us a lot closer, I think. Because our relationship has not been easy.

http://www.more.com/relationships/att...

And if you'd like to hear from the real women whose story inspired After Her, here they are:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZmyOr...


message 40: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Billur wrote: "Hi joyce.. First of all sorry for my english, because i am from turkey..but i thing it will be enough to describe my feelingss.. When i get this invitation, i get so very suprised and appreciated t..."

Hi Billar

You are the very first Turkish reader I ever heard from . So, thank you for writing to me. And your English is MUCH better than my Turkish. (I understand you perfectly. )

It's always a frustrating thing with translations of my work that I can't read the books myself to know whether the writing still sounds like my voice. (Though I HAVE read some of the french translations, and love them.)

I am consulted about the title in translation, however. In the case of Labor Day, the title had to be changed because the Labor Day holiday does not exist in many other countries where the novel was translated. With Good Daughters, I'm not sure why the title had to be changed, but i believe i did give approval to the one they chose.

Which one do you prefer?


message 41: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Elyse wrote: "such beautiful comments --& questions --

I can't to read "After Her". You sure make it sound good, *Ti*! (I just ordered it from Amazon).

Does anyone know where to find the movie 'Labor Day' in t..."


The Labor Day movie comes out on Christmas Day in some cities, and will be released more widely in Jan 2014. It's a terrific movie.

here's a trailer:

http://www.comingsoon.net/films.php?i...


message 42: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Obsidian Blue wrote: "I really did enjoy Labor Day and The Good Daughters. Have you thought about revisiting any of these characters in future books?"

Hello O. B. : I miss all of my characters, once I'm finished with a novel. ANd maybe one day I'll revisit one or two of them. But my guess is that you can't go home again. I have these very intense times with my characters, and in most cases it's probably best if I didn't try to replicate that feeling again. I will definitely keep writing , though.


message 43: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "Elyse wrote: "such beautiful comments --& questions --

I can't to read "After Her". You sure make it sound good, *Ti*! (I just ordered it from Amazon).

Does anyone know where to find the movie 'L..."


Opens Christmas day. Wide release in January. I love this movie.


message 44: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "Really enjoyed "After Her" and loved your memoir, "At Home in the World". Such a brave book. A question re: your most recent book in particular. You used the story of the murderer, the detective an..."

I didn't discuss the details with the sisters, in advance, but they gave me their blessing to write as I chose. The important part, for me, was remaining true to the spirit of their relationship with each other and with their father--a lovable but flawed man they adored. And to what it felt like to be eleven and thirteen, in that family, during those times.


message 45: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Chrissi wrote: "Hi Joyce, I'm Chrissi and I'm a novelist too. I first read your book "At Home in the World," then picked it up again recently, around the time I published my own first novel. I really enjoyed you..."

Hi Chrissi

I love Marilyn Robinson , Alice Munro, Lorrie Moore. Joan Didion. Ann Beattie was an important early influence. And for the classics: Always Jane Austen.


message 46: by Joyce, Author of After Her (new)

Joyce Maynard | 38 comments Mod
Kim wrote: "I'm also keeping up with your reflections on the responses you're getting from women in regard to your essay on Salinger and you relationship with him. Very important discussion and I appreciate yo..."

Thank you, Kim. As you probably know, there's a highly publicized new book and film out about Salinger. I appear in the film--a decision I made with the knowledge that if i chose not to be interviewed and appear on screen, I'd be spoken ABOUT . I preferred to speak for myself, and don't regret that decision, although I have some profound concerns about the film.

I'm going to provide a link here to the op ed column you spoke of. It inspired some pretty interesting discussion on my Facebook page (and dozens of personal emails to me. Many were from young women who'd had similar experiences to mine. Or not so young women who spoke of the enduring effects of such a relationship in their lives.


message 47: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) Joyce wrote: "Cathie wrote: "Hi Joyce. You just met my son at a publisher's event up here in Toronto and he got you to sign a copy of your book. I wanted to say Thank you in your genoristy of taking the time a..."


message 48: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) I will read it! I'd love to!


message 49: by Elyse (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) Joyce wrote: "Hello, Elyse. As a writer, one of the things I always wish is that I could SEE a reader reading one of my books. (That's one reason why I love to give readings. ) So it's a particular pleasure h..."


message 50: by Elyse (last edited Sep 19, 2013 10:46AM) (new)

Elyse  Walters (httpswwwairbnbcomrooms13491122) I loved that line you wrote in the book and re-read it a few times! (I could see it --feel it --pick up the different smells)!
By the way...I have 1 older sister. Our dad died when I was 4 -she was 9. Our mother (including not much cooking)--was much the same way as 'mom' in your story. I also followed my older sister around everywhere. I think I still might today if I could --but she lives in L.A.
I'll never forget a day when I was 10 years old and took a bus from Oakland to S.F. by myself. I was suppose to walk to the movies. I walked around Chinatown. I told my sister --and she 'freaked'. (told me to tell our mother). It was my mother's best moment when she said..."Thank you for telling me the truth, but please never do that again: you are too young".

but....most of my growing years --it was my sister that tried to keep me safe.

Sisters growing up.... (A wonderful gift)

Thank you for this book --and all your books! Such a beautiful human being you are!


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