Ender's Game (Ender's Saga, #1) Ender's Game discussion


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What I Want from the Ender's Game Movie

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message 1: by thethousanderclub (last edited Jun 07, 2013 10:45PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

thethousanderclub I am an invested, albeit not a zealous, fan of the Ender and Shadow books. I've written about several of those books on The Thousander Club blog (http://thethousanderclub.blogspot.com/). I was instantly excited to hear that the Ender's Game book was going to be adapted into a film, although my excitement was immediately mitigated when I learned that the director of X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Gavin Hood, was at the helm. However, I'm holding out hope, and my wish is that the filmmakers will make sure to get a couple things right with the film adaptation. To wit:

1.) Focus on Moral Dilemmas
2.) Focus on Ender
3.) Focus on the Future

See the full blog post here: http://thethousanderclub.blogspot.com...

What do you most want from the Ender's Game movie?


Carlissa I just finished re-reading Ender's Game in anticipation of the movie. I didn't see X-Men, so I can't comment on Gavin Hood, but I am happy to see that Harrison Ford is playing Graff; Ford is a talented actor and I think he will add much to this film.

I agree with your three points and also hope the film does them justice.

I liked the Speaker For the Dead series better than the Shadow books, so if they do a sequel, I hope they go in that direction first.


thethousanderclub Harrison Ford as Graff is about as perfect a casting decision as I have ever seen. Although I liked the Speak for the Dead and its sequels, I don't think they lend themselves for film adaptation all that well. Ender's Game is clearly a "blockbuster" movie and even though it's very cerebral it provides plenty of opportunities for action set pieces, something average movie-going audiences want.

The Shadow series I think lends itself a little better for the summer movie crowd because you could showcase the national conflicts it presents while still getting enough high-brow material into the film.

At the end of the day, we'll see how well Ender's Game turns out as a film because it will determine whether or not sequels get made.


Jenna I want to make sure that the ship is just like you would picture it in the book. The game room and battle room need to be high tech and fathomable from the book.


message 5: by One (new) - rated it 5 stars

One Flew My only hope is that they stick to the book and don't try to change what is already a great story.


thethousanderclub Jennnnnnna wrote: "I want to make sure that the ship is just like you would picture it in the book. The game room and battle room need to be high tech and fathomable from the book."

What are your impressions of the battle room thus far? There are decent glimpses of it in the trailer. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SRize...


thethousanderclub Is anyone bothered by the obvious age changes of the main characters? Is an older Ender any less interesting or compelling than the younger Ender?


Katy I don't care so much if they stick to the exact details of the book. Movies and books are such very different mediums, that a direct translation is not feasible, or even preferable in many cases. I do hope they keep the spirit of the book, and focus on the underlying story, rather than all the CGI. I am, however, anticipating that I am probably going to hate it.


Carlissa The Thousander Club wrote: "Is anyone bothered by the obvious age changes of the main characters? Is an older Ender any less interesting or compelling than the younger Ender?"

I actually like the children being a little bit older; I had a hard time with the children acting so mature at such a young age even though they were geniuses. When I was reading the story, I pictured the children as being young teens even though in the story they started out very young.


Jenna I am big on factual details when they make a movie about a book. Half of the dystopian appeal is that the Wiggin children are so young. I want to see six year old Ender not a 14 year old Ender


thethousanderclub Jennnnnnna wrote: "I am big on factual details when they make a movie about a book. Half of the dystopian appeal is that the Wiggin children are so young. I want to see six year old Ender not a 14 year old Ender"

I agree there is some value in the children being younger, but I'm just not sure how they would have pulled that off. The only alternative, I think, was to make the characters older.


thethousanderclub Katy wrote: "I don't care so much if they stick to the exact details of the book. Movies and books are such very different mediums, that a direct translation is not feasible, or even preferable in many cases. I..."

I'm a little bit more optimistic; although, I'm not ignorant of how badly filmmakers can screw something up. I think you also make excellent points about not needing to stick too closely to the book. I think that was one of the downfalls of the Harry Potter books, slavish devotion to the source material.


Darion D'Anjou I liked X-Men: Wolverine a lot. Thought it was one of the most character driven X-Men films. In that respect I have high hopes for what this director can do with Ender's Game, which is a heavily character driven science fiction story.

Also, Orson Scott Card is apparently very close to the production, as a consultant, so should be able keep everyone's eyes on the prize with respect to staying true to the nature of the original book.


message 14: by Megan (new)

Megan Hamm Jennnnnnna wrote: "I am big on factual details when they make a movie about a book. Half of the dystopian appeal is that the Wiggin children are so young. I want to see six year old Ender not a 14 year old Ender"

I am torn about the age issue as well, but then I think. Even with well trained child actors, could you imagine trying to wrangle 20, 10, or even 5, 6 year olds to do what you want them to do? Even for money? I doubt it. I have one 6 year old that doesn't listen. lol. But I think, that it will be okay with the older kids, I just wonder how they are going to make Ender smaller.. He is like.. 6 foot in real life. Harrison Ford.. is like 5 foot 10.


message 15: by One (new) - rated it 5 stars

One Flew The age question is an interesting one. The main thing is that they don't try to change the plot, small details here or there aren't a huge deal, but the story itself is the main thing. Although I'm uncertain wether they changed the characters ages because it would have been hard to make it realistic with Ender being so young, or because they're trying to appeal to the whole teenage, hunger games loving type age group.


Jenna The age thing only bothers me because it takes away from the whole dystopian plot. The reason why Enders' victories and accomplishments were so significant to us readers is because he was so young. Valentine and and her brother wouldn't have been such a surprise as political moguls if they weren't 10 and 12. Had they been in their twenties or thirties, it wouldn't have been as significant


thethousanderclub One wrote: "The age question is an interesting one. The main thing is that they don't try to change the plot, small details here or there aren't a huge deal, but the story itself is the main thing. Although ..."

My feeling is that the age change was mostly due to the impossibility of actors looking or being so incredibly young, 4 to 6 years of age, while still being able to carry a motion picture on their shoulders. However, your suggestion that they're attempting to appeal to a certain teenage crowd may not be too far off. I wouldn't consider Asa Butterfield a teenage heartthrob so perhaps that's more evidence of the former.


thethousanderclub Jennnnnnna wrote: "The age thing only bothers me because it takes away from the whole dystopian plot. The reason why Enders' victories and accomplishments were so significant to us readers is because he was so young...."

I'm not sure I would classify the Ender's Game book as "dystopian." Yes, it's set in the future and not everything is rosy, but it's no Brave New World, at least not completely. You bring up good points about Valentine and Peter, but I think the age change won't harm the impact too much.


Jenna The Thousander Club wrote: "Jennnnnnna wrote: "The age thing only bothers me because it takes away from the whole dystopian plot. The reason why Enders' victories and accomplishments were so significant to us readers is becau..."

Ender's Game is both sci-fi and dystopian. However, it's only because of how the children trained at the battle schools and command schools are treated and how young they are. If it were adults in Ender's situation, it would be looked at from a much more lenient perspective


Wendy I think the age change is important in only one aspect--we're meant to believe that, despite his intelligence, Ender is able to be deceived as to the nature of the 'simulations' at the end. While a 14-year-old can conceivably be deceived like that, it was a little easier to believe a 6- to 12-year-old being deceived. The younger a person is, generally the more naive and gullible they are, regardless of their intelligence.

Ultimately, it will depend on how well Asa Butterfield and the people around him act whether the age change will be pulled off believably or not, I think. The filmmakers and actors will just have to convince us that a 14-year-old couldn't figure that out, which shouldn't be hard, if they didn't alter the story and/or dialogue too much, because in the book, Ender's existence was rather sheltered.

Although that is one other aspect--the Ender of the book was sheltered from reality in the battle school from age 6, and his education (and breaking) took place over a period of around five to six years. They haven't cast a 'young Ender', from the looks of it, so I guess we're meant to accept that a 14-year-old who hadn't been sheltered for half his life would not be curious about these things and ask questions?

I think it will work anyway, just a few thoughts on the subject rattling around in my brain....


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

I like the decision to make him a bit older. Though it was a big detail of the book that made Ender that much more amazing, making him 14 years old makes it more believable to people. And I do agree that Harrison Ford is perfect for Graff, haven't decided on the rest of the cast yet.


thethousanderclub And I do agree that Harrison Ford is perfect for Graff, haven't decided on the rest of the cast yet.

I think Hailee Steinfeld as Petra is also a very, very good choice.


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

I don't really know much about her so I guess that's why I haven't decided but she looks the part


thethousanderclub Wendy wrote: "I think the age change is important in only one aspect--we're meant to believe that, despite his intelligence, Ender is able to be deceived as to the nature of the 'simulations' at the end. While ..."

I think if the filmmakers can fool the movie audiences that haven't read the book, then they've done exactly what they needed to prove that Ender was fooled. If the movie audience figures it out (again, those who haven't read the book or know the ending), then I think they would have failed.


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