The Sword and Laser discussion

Among Others
This topic is about Among Others
347 views
2013 Reads > AO: Mor or Mor? Did anybody else catch this? (Spoiler)

Comments Showing 1-20 of 20 (20 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Katina French (thatdarnkat) | 48 comments Okay, I've scanned most of the other threads on the book, and I don't see where anyone else picked this up.

I'm pretty sure narrator wasn't actually Morwenna, it was Morganna. She just started using her twin sister's name after the accident that killed her. I'm basing this on three things I noticed:

1. The one time Mori signs her name, after her "vow" to only use magic under special circumstances, she signs it "Morganna" (At least, that's how it was in the copy I read).

2. Later in the book, she says something about taking her sister's name after the accident, and that she thought her Welsh relatives knew but they never said anything.

3. There's a long tradition in magic and fantasy lore that knowing your true name gives other's power over you. It makes sense that feeling like she was in hostile territory, Mori would not give her real name. Also, it might have been an additional way of protecting herself from her mother, if she hoped her mother wouldn't know for sure which twin had survived.

Am I the only person who noticed this?


message 2: by Louise (last edited Jun 05, 2013 05:47PM) (new) - added it

Louise (louiseh87) | 352 comments http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1...

Nope :) Though I'm not sure if we discussed whether its actually the other sister narrating.


Katina French (thatdarnkat) | 48 comments Ah... I hadn't remembered the date of the signed entry, so I skipped over that thread. [facepalm]

Thanks. :)


Nathan (tenebrous) | 377 comments Congrats though. I never noticed.


message 5: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy Sinnott | 31 comments I'm only half way through but if its for protection from her mother, so far she refers to the face burning in the pictures as 'her face' so it doesn't seem to be working


message 6: by E (new) - rated it 1 star

E | 16 comments I saw #1 as well but I was so painfully bored at the time I thought perhaps it was an just an error and didn't give it any more thought. Your theory definitely makes sense though!


Katina French (thatdarnkat) | 48 comments Amy - Good point. I hadn't even thought about the fact that the Wicked Mum of the Welsh had burned the surviving twin's face out of the pics.


message 8: by Rob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rob (rwblackburn) | 16 comments I picked up on that too, and you are correct.

I actually thought for a shoprt while, that given the way the magic system works in this book that maybe it was the sister that died originally, but then some time later she used magic to trade places; to make it where she was the one that died and her sister survived. The result was the sister, who now survived in her place, "decided" to use her name in grief as the magic's way of compinsating for this change in history without rewriting too much history or making it too impactfull on bystanders.

Based on the author's FAQ (http://papersky.livejournal.com/50411...) it turns out I was over thinking it,.. but it was a fun theory while it lasted.


Dazerla | 222 comments Rob wrote: "I picked up on that too, and you are correct.

I actually thought for a shoprt while, that given the way the magic system works in this book that maybe it was the sister that died originally, but ..."


What an interesting theory, I really like.


Julian Arce | 71 comments I noticed #2 and it makes a lot of sense, both making a connection to the dead Mor and to have magic protection against her mother, since most traditions consider that words, and specially names have power.

Actually, in some cultures children would be given a "public" name, but their real name was a secret, so as to prevent magical influence. Also why magicians would choose secret names for themselves - a bit surprised that the Mor's didn't choose secret names, must have been very attached to their Mor-Mor.

Does Morganna also mean something in Welsh?


message 11: by Louise (new) - added it

Louise (louiseh87) | 352 comments Julián wrote: "Does Morganna also mean something in Welsh?"

I looked this up, but not as far as I can tell. Morgan (from which it presumably originates, through Morgan le Fey), possibly means "great circle" or something.
However, morwyn, which is where Morwenna comes from, means "maid", which would make sense if Morwenna had been the one who died because that's what she would have remained.

Really, they should be the other way around - Morwenna the maid, and Morganna the sorceress (who outlives Arthur in the legend I think and accompanies is body to Avalon).


Julian Arce | 71 comments Didn't she mentioned to Janine that Morwenna meant something like "breaking waves" or "white sea"?


message 13: by Louise (new) - added it

Louise (louiseh87) | 352 comments Julián wrote: "Didn't she mentioned to Janine that Morwenna meant something like "breaking waves" or "white sea"?"

Yeah, it has a dual meaning. Either "maiden" or "white seas". I suppose she's more likely to give the later because she doesn't like how she's changing to be less like her sister.


message 14: by Rob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rob (rwblackburn) | 16 comments I don't think the reason she took the new name was for magic/protection reasons. She says a few times that names and nouns in general have no magical power. I think it was just over grief.


Scott | 312 comments I noticed #2, but reading your post #3 really makes sense. Throughout the book, Mori references the fear of letting magic control her (and others). Using her twin's name could make sense in that context.


Katina French (thatdarnkat) | 48 comments Rob wrote: "I actually thought for a short while, that given the way the magic system works in this book that maybe it was the sister that died originally, but but then some time later she used magic to trade places; to make it where she was the one that died and her sister survived. The result was the sister, who now survived in her place, "decided" to use her name in grief as the magic's way of compinsating for this change in history without rewriting too much history or making it too impactfull on bystanders. ..."

That is a fun theory, but it also makes my head hurt.

Because it would mean Mor died, and Mor survived, but Mor changed places with Mor, who then took Mor's name as a tribute and to appease the forces of probability and/or continuity for disrupting things by (A) having a twin sister with the same name in the first place, and (B) trading places with that sister posthumously via magical intervention.

I think I just broke my cogitator.


message 17: by Rob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rob (rwblackburn) | 16 comments Ya, made my head hurt a bit too :)


message 18: by Art (new) - rated it 5 stars

Art | 190 comments yes, I picked up on this. I was confused when I saw the vow and wondered if it was typo, but then it made sense when she said about taking her dead sister's name and no one noticing. She used her real name for the vow.


Chris Michel (smedwood) | 20 comments What about the theory that there never was a twin sister? I finished the book a while ago so I can't remember if anyone besides Mor references her twin. I didn't start thinking about this until Tom brought it up in the latest podcast. I think Mor got a letter from her mother mentioning both twins. But I can't remember for sure. I don't recall her father, auntie, or grampar ever speaking about the other twin. It is an interesting idea that the "twin" could be her imaginary friend and the trauma from the accident could have "killed" her.

Although didn't she tell the whole story, twin sister and all, to Wim? Maybe I need a re-read.


Maria The twin sister comes up when Mor goes to the party at her old friends' house, and Nasreen is wearing a red sweater, and says they're twins. Then everyone is REALLY awkward, because other!Mor is dead.


back to top