At Home in Mitford (Mitford Years, #1) At Home in Mitford discussion


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Too slow?

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message 1: by Robyn (new)

Robyn I actually thought this book was very slow. I read most of it, then decided that I wasn't interested in finishing it. Maybe I missed something that pulled it all together.


Susan I actually thought the book was really slow, too. Maybe the author was trying to make readers feel a part of the daily life but it was hard to keep reading. I did finish the book because I was a little curious and it does have a few fun happy things happen. I might try to read the second book in the series.


Norman R. I have read the book as well as all of Jan Karon's books and it does help when one is older. We tend to live life at a slower pace including our reading. Norm


Peggy I did enjoy this book, but it really was slow. I got almost to the end and picked up a Jodi Picoult and never looked back. Didn't really realize how slow it was until I saw other people's comments. Oh well, I'm sure it will have a happy ending with or without my finishing it!


Helen Lopes I have read the entire series and this is what I find one of the positive points of them all but I consider it "restful" and not slow


Mary Helen wrote: "I have read the entire series and this is what I find one of the positive points of them all but I consider it "restful" and not slow"

I agree just a wonderful heart warming read loved the whole series.


Melissa The book was way too slow. I couldn't get into it. I rarely put a book down rather than finish it, but I just couldn't get into it.


Laura Helen wrote: "I have read the entire series and this is what I find one of the positive points of them all but I consider it "restful" and not slow"

This is exactly why I loved the book. It was peaceful, slow, and meditative.


Judy I did not feel this book was "aiming" at a younger reader. You are so right, the pace was slow, however, the peace it brought, the warm feelings and great remembrances are well worth the slow read. I have now read the entire series and enjoyed them all!


message 10: by Lisa (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lisa I found the intentful pace of Mitford, as well as it's quiet ambiance and simple concerns positively therapeutic.

It is at once reassuring and refreshing to follow the lives of these small town characters into a world which - while infiltrated by the ugly side of humanity, like neglect, poverty, abuse, prejudice, arrogance and indifference - also luxuriated in moments of concern over the color of spring flowers or basked in the fragrance of dinner on the stove. All in all, it gently embraced the often-met capacity for individual and community growth through the eyes of a man, himself struggling to attain personal fulfillment while gracefully leading his parish.

Throughout the series Jan Karon writes beautifully, pausing at just the right moments and advancing an engaging plot all in due time, and neatly within 300 or so pages.

It is Jan Karon's appreciation of simple and abundant joys – and her dedication to thoughtfully commemorating everyday miracles while celebrating the potential of our higher selves that brings me back to the pages of this lovely series.

The real world, as much as fiction, is ours to create. When I need to shut out the man-made insanity of our modern world, I step back, slow down and steal away an evening to immerse in the reassuring Jan Karon-made world of Mitford.


message 11: by Judy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Judy I love the slow pace. I'm ready to get back to the rest of the series.


Elizabeth I wonder if perhaps younger people, who have grown up with microwaves, lightning-fast internet and push buttons of all kinds,simply can't take a slow-paced book. When our book club discussed it, the opinions were pretty much divided along an age divide.


message 13: by Lori (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lori It actually was pretty slow when I first started reading it but then it kinda picked up pace! You just gotta be patient!


Beth Well, I am in my mid-30s and I love the slow pace myself. I have finished all of the books twice and I am ready to start reading them again. They are extremely soul-lifting. I always feel better after reading them.


Elizabeth Beth, have you read Patches of Godlight? It's a colllection of quotes from Father Tim. Talk about soul-lifting!


Christine I have the whole series and love them all. Maybe because I'm a middle age pastor's wife. LOL


Robin I have read all of the Mitford series and loved them all. I would love to live in a town like Mitford where everyone is close and caring. Is there such a place today?


message 18: by Linda (new)

Linda Like some of the other readers who posted here, I found the entire Mitford series peaceful, therapeutic, a balm. I discovered them at a time of grieving and the books lifted me up and helped me get through that period. I also fell in love with the characters who are engaging and -- for the most part -- wholesome, if sometimes flawed. The author breathes life into the fictional town of Mitford so that you feel as if you live there and share the same friendships as the main character. In an age of violent news, violent thrillers, violent movies and TV shows, I found these books refreshing and healing. I recommend them to others who might be over 35 or are dealing with loss and sorrow. They are the ideal antidote.


Beth Elizabeth wrote: "Beth, have you read Patches of Godlight? It's a colllection of quotes from Father Tim. Talk about soul-lifting!"

I have not. I have glanced through a few pages and I have wanted to read it, but I have not had the chance. I am going to have to get it at some point.


Beth Linda wrote: "Like some of the other readers who posted here, I found the entire Mitford series peaceful, therapeutic, a balm. I discovered them at a time of grieving and the books lifted me up and helped me get..."

They are great books to help you get through rough parts of life.


Karen I started the first book years ago on the recommendation of my sister. I kept waiting for "something" to happen. I stopped reading and talked to my sister who said that nothing ever really happens. She felt that was the beauty if the book. Just life in a small town.
I picked it up again this year and finished it. It helped to not be "anticipating" and just enjoy the present little moments.
I won't read the rest of the series. I like a little action!


Teressa The pace of the book seems very reflective of Father Tim's life. His is a slow life, where little occurs that would be called noteworthy. Actually, the pace of his life, the way he thinks that he's not "getting anywhere" compared to his more ambitious colleagues is somewhat reflective of the life most people experience. We don't go haring off after dragon's gold or get kidnapped by pirates or even have dark, handsome strangers move in next door. We toddle about in our little routines hardly daring to hope for something, anything, to happen.

What I found encouraging was Father Tim's daring to take the difficult way, to extend himself in the service of others.


message 23: by Cindi (last edited Nov 16, 2012 05:21PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Cindi Lisa wrote: "I found the intentful pace of Mitford, as well as it's quiet ambiance and simple concerns positively therapeutic.

It is at once reassuring and refreshing to follow the lives of these small town c..."

Very good description of how I found this book along with the others that I've read in the series.

Maybe I enjoyed it moreso because I am an older reader and like the slower pace.


message 24: by Barb (new) - rated it 5 stars

Barb This is a story about a 60 year old Episcopal priest, in a small town, whose entire life is turned upside down by a woman, a dog, and some children. Seriously, how fast can that be?

As a librarian, this series is definitely not one I would recommend to anyone younger than about 40. Not that someone younger couldn't enjoy it, but I truly think it takes someone older to love the quirky characters of Mitford. And, for someone to understand the life changes taking place for the characters, you need to have a sense of their settledness (if that is a word). And, as others have said, it feels as if you need some years of life experience to truly appreciate this small town and its everyday concerns.

I found the series totally charming and tremendously humorous. Often the poignancy of the story would cause me to rethink my own life, and to appreciate the little things I take for granted. There is, of course, the underlining spirituality and strong sense of community and friendship that made it so hard to see the series end. I still miss all of those people. Maybe I should pay them a return visit.


message 25: by Barb (new) - rated it 5 stars

Barb Teressa wrote: "The pace of the book seems very reflective of Father Tim's life. His is a slow life, where little occurs that would be called noteworthy. Actually, the pace of his life, the way he thinks that he..."
Oh, you definitely have it down. As we get older, and I do mean over 40, we start to understand that the only really important thing in our lives is the relationships with those around us and not the things that happen to us. When younger we experience life, and as we get older, we experience relationships.


message 26: by Denise (new) - added it

Denise Lippy I love the Father Tim books! I didn't find them slow at all! They were restful, funny, heartwarming and exciting! I couldn't wait to read the next one! I was sorry she stopped the series. It is probably time for a visit to Mitford!


LeAnne I've read most of the series and really enjoy it. It is a slower paced read and I guess older folks (like me) would like that more. After I've been reading suspenseful Baldacci's, etc., I like to take a break with something relaxing like life with Father Tim.


Linda Simons I have read the Mitford Series so many times I had to replace book one. I am lucky to live in a town that is actually smaller than Mitford. I can pick out of characters in her books on our Main Street. What I really love about Ms. Karon's writing is the spiritual lessons that she gives us throught Father Tim


Rebecca Pate I have read every book in this series and everything else I could get my hands on by Jan Karon. I absolutely loved them. It was almost as if I knew each and every character personally. I couldn't wait to get to the next book and see what would happen next to the townspeople of Mitford. It was refreshing to me to read something slow paced and peaceful in this busy, stressfilled life we live in. I was very sad when I got to the last book because I did not want it to end!


message 30: by Bruna (new) - added it

Bruna Bellini i couldnt even finish this book.. very slow and the characters also didnt help it!


Ginger Robyn wrote: "I actually thought this book was very slow. I read most of it, then decided that I wasn't interested in finishing it. Maybe I missed something that pulled it all together."

I agree ~ there are a lot of slow parts to the story but it does all come together eventually.


Donna Mcclees geddes It's been awhile since I read this book, but I have finished the whole series and have read some of them more than once. As far as being "slow", I would have to say no. For the most part, maybe restful, but I found plenty of adventure and excitement throughout the series.

Father Tim's experiences with his adopted dog, the young boy who crosses his path, and his neighbor have plenty of action, as well as the many characters that are just, well, characters. I have "met" many of these people in real life. Just his interaction with the people around him is enough excitement for me.

I think relationships and redemption are a major theme in these books. Also, throughout the series he is dealing with the effects his very stern, angry father had on his life along with his subsequent journey to be free from those effects, while at the same time ministering grace to many hurting people.

Also, in order to understand what it's all about, you do need to read more than just the first book. Many things come to light in the books that follow.


Laurel I have read half the series and I'm looking forward to reading the rest of the books. I enjoy cast of characters, but what I appreciate the most is the chronicling of Father Tim's spiritual life and how he endeavours to live out his faith on a daily basis. Maybe it depends on where you're at in life or spiritual journey as to how much you will to enjoy it.


Teressa I agree with you Laurel; the spiritual part is what attracts me to these books and keeps me coming back to read them again. If that doesn't interest a reader, then I guess they would move pretty slowly.


LeAnne It's a story about life in a small town and life runs at a slower pace in small towns. Big cities are whiz, bang, hurry, screech, navigate rush hour... lots of excitement, but sometimes we need to stop and smell the roses. Mitford is a nice place to smell those roses and I love the quirky people who live there. I've read the first 6 books of the series and there is a gradual progression of life in Mitford and outside of Mitford. I love Father Tim and the way he has grown, even at his age. He is a dear.


Dianne Greco I have read all of Jan Karons' books and I love them all. The books I have written have been compared to them, so there you go! They are a sweet and gentle read, and with all the bad stuff going on these days, it's nice to kick back with something uplifting.


Christine I've read all of Jan Karon's books at least twice. I found them to be refreshing and helpful to remind me to enjoy the simple things in life. I listened to these books as well and they did not seem slow as I was listening as I did remodeling in my home. They were GREAT company.


Dianne Greco Didn't you just love the reader? He was exactly what I imagined Father Tim to sound like. They are the kind of books that you can go back to over and over; comforting, peaceful and a definite reminder of the joys of simple pleasures.


Christine Oh, ya. Just LOVE John McDonough. He has a awesome voice. I've listened to all of John's books, also. I was really sad when I researched John McDonough and found out that his has passed. I would recommend listening to all of Jan Karon's books. I liked to listen to them in order.


Dianne Greco I have too, and I will again! It is indeed sad that John McDonough passed. We have lost a wonderful reader. We'll just have to go on listening in his memory. As a matter of fact, I think I'll get one tomorrow! Thanks for the reminder!


Jeane All of the books in this series have been a joy to read for me. They envoke a sense of peace and boy do we need some of that in our modern society. Perhaps, as some mentioned, we who are older don't find the pace slow, but relaxing instead.


Debbie It was a slow book to get into and I didn't think I would be able to finish it and wondered why everyone loved it so. But then all the sudden I got completely drawn into the characters and couldn't put it down. I would love to read the series again one day. I tell people who ask about the book, to keep reading it and see if it finally grabs you like it did me.


Laura I thought this book was too slow at first (I'm used to thrillers!). In fact I was about to abandon it but my mom said how much she loved it and how peaceful she found it, so I dove back in and I really did get draw into it and ended up thoroughly enjoying it and finding the reading relaxing. Gave me a cozy feeling.


LeAnne The Mitford books are such a refreshing change from the mysteries I love. It's like spending some time in the country, just relaxing and taking life easy. I love the quirky characters in all the stories; and I enjoy the progression of life with all of them.


Vickie Kelley I love Jan Karon''s series of books. I came from a small town and can relate to many of the things that happen in Mitford. Am ready for her next book being out in Sept.


message 46: by Vickie (last edited Aug 04, 2014 06:13PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Vickie Kelley Barbara wrote: "This is a story about a 60 year old Episcopal priest, in a small town, whose entire life is turned upside down by a woman, a dog, and some children. Seriously, how fast can that be?

As a librar..."
her new book is coming out in September of 2014


Perri I received the first book from my mother, on CD. I think she was looking for something different that what the Mitford story was about. I started to listen to it, and understood why she gave it to me, slower paced than what we are used to reading/listening to.

I found myself continuing to listen to the story, chuckling at certain parts, and ended up enjoying the peaceful, simple tone of the book.

And yes, the reader (John McDonough) could not have been better. He did bring the character of Father Tim to life, as well as the other characters.

I always give a book a couple of chapters before I totally dismiss a book, and I'm glad I gave this one a couple of CD's worth of listening. Having listened to this on CD verses reading it probably made the experience richer.


Vickie Kelley Perri wrote: "I received the first book from my mother, on CD. I think she was looking for something different that what the Mitford story was about. I started to listen to it, and understood why she gave it t..."

Did not know you could get it on a CD. But since I have read the books already, will continue to read on the ipad. Am getting anxious for the next book to be published


message 49: by Nora (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nora I liked what Helen wrote that rather than slow, it is restful. The characters had their challenges,but life moved along not at a frenetic rate. Change of pace books....


message 50: by Nora (last edited Aug 04, 2014 08:05PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nora Vickie wrote: "Barbara wrote: "This is a story about a 60 year old Episcopal priest, in a small town, whose entire life is turned upside down by a woman, a dog, and some children. Seriously, how fast can that be..."
good point; however, his sharp wit and perspectives are entrancing.


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