Douglas Adams (incorporating The Hitchhiker's Guide) discussion

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message 1: by Purple (new)

Purple | 9 comments Mod
Hello!

So, where do you start with a man who crams more ideas onto a single page than most writers can gather in a whole book?

I have no recollection of my first introduction to the wonderful works of Mr Adams, although I'm fairly sure it would've been the Hitchhikers Guide. It's just seems to be a story that I've always known!


message 2: by Carine (new)

Carine | 1 comments So True!!!


message 3: by Eric▲ (new)

Eric▲ (ɔıɹǝ) | 4 comments 42 seems to be apearing more and more often...


message 4: by Damian (new)

Damian Armand | 1 comments Who's next? I've read his collection over and over and I'm looking for someone with similar flavor...


message 5: by Eric▲ (new)

Eric▲ (ɔıɹǝ) | 4 comments he's one of a kind author
the improbability of there being annother one like him is as follows

2^267709:1 against


message 6: by Purple (new)

Purple | 9 comments Mod
Ha ha!

People often make comparisons between Adams and Jasper Fforde. Although it's not really sci-fi, there're still crazy situations and characters in his books. Same goes for Robert Rankin, although I've only read one of his so far...


message 7: by Eric▲ (new)

Eric▲ (ɔıɹǝ) | 4 comments 24 members.
.........srebmem 42


message 8: by Richard (new)

Richard (RichHL) | 1 comments There's always Pratchett who credited Douglas as an influence in his "With Great Pleasure" on Radio 4 on Christmas morning.


message 9: by Purple (new)

Purple | 9 comments Mod
I've always meant to get into Pratchett, but have found starting his body of work a somewhat daunting prospect... My sister loves his books, though, and tells me (often) that it's rewarding to do so!


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

It's definitely worth getting into some of Pratchett's work, even if it isn't Discworld. Only You Can Save The World's a pretty good one to start with - it's sci-fi and short-ish. Out of the Discworld series, I've always enjoyed Moving Pictures, The Last Continent and Thief of Time.

Curiously enough, I've been aware of Pratchett far longer than Adams, but I didn't touch any of Pratchett's books until a few years after I first read the Guide.


message 11: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
I first read "the Guide" as a Senior in high school. I remember giving it to my best friend, doing an interpretive reading from it for speech, etc. Ever since I wear 42 on any sports jersey, etc. I don't know that I had been around that kind of wit and comment on society's good and bad, but it made an impression. I'm now in my mid 40's and I still have a copy on my shelf to peruse during finals week. And while I love Ford and Arthur, I think Dirk Gently may have been his best work.


message 12: by [deleted user] (last edited Apr 01, 2009 02:43AM) (new)

I have been lurking in this group for a while now but I thought I should introduce myself.

I First encountered THHGTTG on it's first run on BBC radio and have been a huge fan ever since. I have followed the radio productions slavishly and really enjoyed the BBC TV series. I now own both the radio shows and the DVDs of the TV series.
I read the books when they were first released and was fortunate enough to have So Long and Thanks For all the Fish signed by DA at a signing at Forbidden Planet (the original one, just off of Tottenham Court Road) in London.
I have also been a big fan of Terry Pratchett, having read most of his books up to Monstrous Regiment, although I seem to have lost that addiction in the past couple of years.
Just recently I have been listening to The Brightonomicon on BBC Radio 7, and I must say I am very intrigued and am thinking about reading some of Robert Rankins books now.
Has anyone else read any Rankin, I assume the best place to start would be with the Brentford Trilogy (all 8 books)?


message 13: by Purple (new)

Purple | 9 comments Mod
Hi David! Wow, you actually met DA? That's pretty cool! Did you get a chance to chat at all, or was it just a brief encounter? Just out of interest why 'So Long...' was it the one you were buying at the time, or did you take that book especially? I was at that Forbidden Planet at the weekend as it goes!

As for Robert Rankin, I've read 'The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse' and have to say I enjoyed it. It was set in Toy Town, and thus was quite like Jasper Fforde's Nursery Crimes books. I'd certainly recommend it, and it seemed like a fair place to start his books with. I have a copy of 'The Brightonomicon', but have yet to read it (I planned on reading 'The Cryptonomicon' first, but have yet to do so (big book; no time!)) I also have 'Waiting for Godalming' as I live nearby as Robert clearly does also, but again time restrains me!

Cynthiaj, out of curiosity why do you consider Dirk Gently better? Anything in particular? Does anybody else feel the same?


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)

It was the launch signing for So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.So as you can imagine it was a very short hello with DA as the que was around the building...(as far as I remember)!


message 15: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Dirk is more subtle. Guide is great for quick & easy, down & dirty as I call it in class. He is making fun of society and wants everybody to know it. Dirk is probably just as satirical a work but much less "in our face" with it.


message 16: by Jim (new)

Jim | 5 comments I started with H2G2 after seeing the BBC series on PBS in the early 80s. Have not looked back since and have been through Dirk and the non fiction several times. My copies of the books are not only slightly foxed but badgered and wolfed too (thanks to TP for that!). You will rarely, if ever, find a H2G2 book in a used book store. True fans hang on to them forever!


message 17: by Sammie (new)

Sammie (samantha_f) | 3 comments Hi, time I introduced myself.

I was introduced to H2G2 when I heard a small amount of the original radio series that my Mum was listening to on tape one day. I then read all the books, aquired the DVD of the TV series, then the CD of the radio series to date, then the audio books, listened to the latest installments of the radio series when the aired on R4 a few years ago....

Okay so I'm a little obsessed.

The thing I love most about DNA is that I can pick up my copy of H2G2, open at any page, and find an amusing line, idea or just something that'll make me smile.

I was gutted when I heard that he had died. Reading the unfinished 'Salmon of Doubt' was bitter sweet. We miss you Douglas.


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi! I'm Mattea, that would probably be why it says so.

Eric, thank you for stating the improbability factor.

Well, you could always start with 6 X 9. (Hint: try base 13) Or you could follow someone. You won't turn up where you were going, but you will be where you need to be.


CaptKirk42 Classic Whovian (klandersen) | 11 comments Hello fellow towel carrying froods who like fiddlybits around the fjords, or something that equals 42.

I'm Kirk and have been a Hitchhiker's and DA fan since the early 80s.

I first heard about H2G2 and Adams from some friends around 81 or 82 at that point H2G2 and Restaurant were the only two books out. I think I got into the books about a year before Life the Universe & Everything came out. I recall I had to wait for that one to be released. My friends who introduced me to it had mentioned 42 as being the answer and I think they mentioned something that was unique to the series that got my attention. Soon I was hooked.

Then the BBC did the television 6 part mini-series, which PBS first showed as a 7 part series. Not all PBS stations re-edited the series into 7 parts but in DC in 82 they did. I had many arguments with a friend about the 6 vs. 7 episodes bit as they only showed it as 7 parts the one time in 82 (maybe 2 times with a rebroadcast at one point). So I remember some episode ending scenes where the episode doesn't end anymore.


message 20: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen Hello Douglas Adams fans. I've been tooling around GR trying to look for a group that really fits me. I was surprised when I looked up Hitchhiker's Guide that so many people had taken time out to write reviews--this made me think that Adams fans were more devoted than your normal fans. In addition, many of the reviews were delightful--making me think that Adams fan could banter about books in a way that is delightful.

Who am I? Struggling writer, PhD student, dude who thinks everyone needs to lighten up. A little bit of all of these things, I suppose. Looking forward to getting to know you guys.


message 21: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen Purple wrote: "Hello!

So, where do you start with a man who crams more ideas onto a single page than most writers can gather in a whole book?

I have no recollection of my first introduction to the wonderful..."


There seems to be a kind of realism to Adams universes that make his writing both sweet and a little bit melancholy at the same time.

I still want to read Dirk Gentely again when I get a chance.


message 22: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Welcome Daniel. The group takes it by fits and starts. On the whole, we might be too worried about the small green bits of paper...


message 23: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen Cynthiaj wrote: "Welcome Daniel. The group takes it by fits and starts. On the whole, we might be too worried about the small green bits of paper..."

At first I didn't understand what you meant by small green bits of paper--then it occurred to me that you mean money. Yes, I suppose that is a motivating factor.

Wouldn't it be nice though if our dollars came with George Washingtons that had dialogue boxes that say "Don't Panic".

And then when our boss leans over and says to us, "Yeah, we're thinking about reworking the department a little...so..." We'd pull out an old greenback, ask our greenback the big question: What's it all about? And surely, we'd see that big sign that says "Don't Panic" and then maybe we'd feel alright for a bit.


message 24: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
But the "Don't Panic" would have to be in Large Friendly Letters. And I doubt the government could pull that off.


message 25: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Clausen Cynthiaj wrote: "But the "Don't Panic" would have to be in Large Friendly Letters. And I doubt the government could pull that off."

Exactly.


message 26: by Fabrizio (new)

Fabrizio (LupoMannaro) | 2 comments Good evening all
My name is Fabrizio...but most people call me Fab.

It was my first year in High School, back in the 1980s, when my good friend Mark Farrugia loaned me his copy of Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy that I entered the wonderful world of Douglas Adams and was obsessed. I read the rest of the series as the books became available and got a copy of the BBC radio play.

As much as I adore the HGTG series, for me Dirk Gently's the man!
Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul is undoubtedly in my Top 10 books of all time!!

The world certainly lost a literary giant when DA passed.
It’s great to see groups like this.

Pleasure to meet you all.


message 27: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Welcome Fab!

I also love Dirk. I still sometimes use his method of navigation when driving and have a copy of Tea Time right next to my copy of the Guide on my bookshelf at work.

Cynthia


message 28: by Fabrizio (new)

Fabrizio (LupoMannaro) | 2 comments Thank you Cynthia. I (inadvertently) use his driving method at times.....must have slipped into my subconscious .


message 29: by Roxy (new)

Roxy (Roxy641) | 2 comments I missed the radio series, but watched the tv series of "Hitchhikers Guide" first, then I bought the book, then radio 4 repeated the radio programme. What I enjoyed were the different versions the tv vs radio versions went in.


message 30: by Dominic (new)

Dominic Green (DominicGreen) | 2 comments It was the book I came across first. It had the words 'THE HITCH HIKER'S GALAXY' printed on it in large, friendly letters. It really should have had DON'T PANIC on the cover somewhere too, but no-one's perfect.


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

The Barnes and Noble hardcover version actually does have DON'T PANIC written on the back! I've actually thought about buying one just for that very reason.


message 32: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Purple wrote: "Ha ha!

People often make comparisons between Adams and Jasper Fforde. Although it's not really sci-fi, there're still crazy situations and characters in his books. Same goes for Robert Rankin, alt..."


I have read some of Jasper Fforde's books, both Thursday Next and Nursery Crimes, since my original perusal of the thread. As I went back and looked over it again, I noticed Purple's post. Although I very much like the books they didn't remind me of DA at all. Fforde's book come across to me as cynical whereas Adam's books are satiric. A fine distinction perhaps, but one none the less.


message 33: by Dominic (new)

Dominic Green (DominicGreen) | 2 comments Will wrote: "The Barnes and Nobles hardcover version actually does have DON'T PANIC written on the back!"

Is it in large, friendly letters? I'm not buying it unless the letters are large and friendly.


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

Well, they were certainly large; they seemed to be fairly friendly looking.


message 35: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Will wrote: "Well, they were certainly large; they seemed to be fairly friendly looking."

If you can't tell the book from the cover, can you tell a book's cover letters by the look?


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

You know . . . I never thought of that! ;-)


message 37: by Robyn (new)

Robyn | 3 comments Sending wishes for all to have a Happy Towel Day tomorrow!

I've been a fan for over 25 years and it's still as fresh today as it was then.

Glad to be in the group!

Robyn


message 38: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Welcome Robyn. I had to "count up" but I think I read the HGTG about 30 years ago while I was in high school. And now my kids know the answer to the Ultimate Question and to make sure they know where their towels are at all times.


message 39: by Robyn (new)

Robyn | 3 comments Cynthiaj wrote: "Welcome Robyn. I had to "count up" but I think I read the HGTG about 30 years ago while I was in high school. And now my kids know the answer to the Ultimate Question and to make sure they know whe..."

Thanks! I have an eight-year-old who will definitely be indoctrinated as soon as possible.


message 40: by Linda (new)

Linda Bohm | 1 comments I just bought The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and I am so far enjoying it thououghly.


CaptKirk42 Classic Whovian (klandersen) | 11 comments I keep reminding myself I need to reread the series again (and then read the unofficial 6th book by Eoin Colfer).


message 42: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi all, I've been a fan since I heard the original radio series. And, of course, that has always been the true source. ;-) I have enjoyed all the other versions but that exceptional BBC vision was simply amazing at the time. There hasn't been another DA, TP comes close but lacks the dark edge that DA had.

M

PS upon reflection Red Dwarf also comes close.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Ha. I was the 42nd comment!


message 44: by Purple (last edited Jan 29, 2013 05:25AM) (new)

Purple | 9 comments Mod
Ha! Nice! :)

Welcome, all!

I really should source the radio series. I should have heard that by now - there is just no excuse!

Right - I'm on it...


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

Radio series: Best ever. I know it off by heart. Literally. I speak along with it. And I am sure this does not annoy anyone.


message 46: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
BTW: Welcome Linda. It is always great when some one new discovers DA.

Mark: Having you parrot the radio dialogue would be fine. It is when my kids finish the quote from THHG for me that I find annoying. (They are 17 and 11 and both do it...)


message 47: by Kate (new)

Kate Korolenko | 1 comments Hi, I'm Kate. I've been a DA fan since I first discovered Hitchhiker's when I was 15.


message 48: by Cynthiaj (new)

Cynthiaj | 24 comments Mod
Welcome Kate. To paraphrase myself (post 46) it is always great when some DA fan discovers us...


CaptKirk42 Classic Whovian (klandersen) | 11 comments Welcome Kate.


message 50: by Sonmi (last edited Apr 03, 2013 09:10PM) (new)

Sonmi (sonmi429) Hello! I'm Soledad and I've just finished the "trilogy" of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I'm hungry for essays about his style and views. If you know about a really good one I can start with, I'd be really glad and thankful.

I first met DA work with the movie, then I listened to the audiobooks and finally read the books (I couldn't find them in my galaxy, er, I mean, country)

EDIT: in fact, it would be awesome if we could create a thread dedicated to work about DA's literature!

See you around


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