Jane Austen discussion

32 views
General Discussion > Man's POV--lovable heroines?

Comments Showing 1-12 of 12 (12 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by McGee Magoo (new)

McGee Magoo Classic romantic literature has given us ladies no shortage of lovable heroes. Jane Austen has given us our beloved Darcy, Gaskell gave us Mr. Thornton and Bronte, Mr. Rochester. I wonder, though, what heroines are worthy of a male readers admiration? I think, were I a man, Elizabeth Bennet wouldn't capture my heart. So, men, I ask you, does any heroine stir you?


message 2: by Sophie (new)

Sophie | 1458 comments I would love to know the answer to this question as well!


message 3: by Megan (new)

Megan Hear hear! Speak up guys!


message 4: by Faby (new)

Faby (fabyhernandez) | 39 comments yes i want to know to :D


message 5: by Robin (new)

Robin (robinpickell) | 19 comments ?: are there many men in this group?


message 6: by McGee Magoo (new)

McGee Magoo We might be out of luck, ladies. Maybe no men on this thread? Men are so different. I would think that my husband would say Jane Eyre because she was mature and serious minded, firm in her morals and not at all dazzled by the money. That's what he'd SAY, but if Lizzie and her fine eyes were around, I bet it'd be Lizzy, even though he'd always suspect seeing Pemberley was what changed her mind. LOL


message 7: by Megan (new)

Megan Robin - I know we have some guys here - maybe they are just shy....


message 8: by Robin (new)

Robin (robinpickell) | 19 comments Recently I read an article by a man on women/ heroines he thought were good influences on women (mainly his daughter I believe), but if I recall correctly they were all contemporary examples. I think that is the issue.


message 9: by J. (new)

J. Rubino (jrubino) | 214 comments I had attended a number of book conferences, and on the panels about men vs women - the sort of women characters written by men and male characters written by women - the men seemed more inclined to have their male characters involved in serial relationships, so the women they encountered, who were usually significantly younger than the male (maybe that's the appeal of Jane Eyre?) and somehow not candidates for marriage. If the relationship got too serious, the woman would usually meet with some dire fate. I found out there was even a name for the ill-fated women in this plot device - "the Cartwright bride" (an allusion to the old television show "Bonanza").

janetility.com


message 10: by McGee Magoo (new)

McGee Magoo J. wrote: "I had attended a number of book conferences, and on the panels about men vs women - the sort of women characters written by men and male characters written by women - the men seemed more inclined t..."

This makes me sad :(


message 11: by Robin (new)

Robin (robinpickell) | 19 comments I don't know if it's sad, more as how women were portrayed/raised prior to WW I. There is a bk I thought you'd like to read if you haven't picked it up yet: Two Guys Read Jane Austen by Steve Chandler & Terrence N. Hill.

I just think women in classic literature don't come across as strong role models. You & I might like Elizabeth or Emma or Anne or Jane from Jane Eyre, but we see her from a feminine point of view. Although its the 21st century and not the 18th, we see similarities as well as differences. Does that make sense?


message 12: by McGee Magoo (new)

McGee Magoo It does make sense and I agree with you. I just thought it was sad that when a man writes his character a love interest, she's gotta die off-- or be a hot young thing that won't be around long. I think I need to start reading more fiction written by men to really see what their heroines are like. Thanks for the recommendation of Two Guys Read JA.


back to top