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message 1: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 8 comments This is a simple ask a question, answer a question game!

How to play: answer the question the previous poster left and ask a question for the next poster.

I'll start this off with a question!

Q: When did you start writing?


message 2: by Michala (new)

Michala Tyann (michalatyann) I started writing when I was seven. My first book was a cross between shirley temple and curious george. LOL I continued writing poetry and short stories.My first novelette was at 8th grade. This last year I finished two novels. one for Nanowrimo and one right after that I'd spent a year on.

Do you have a go to person for you writing inspirations?


message 3: by Roy (new)

Roy Higgins (royahiggins) Both of my novels are set against a backdrop of the nineteen sixties era of pop and free love. Memory and factual events form a large part of my content, but my latest novel has got to have been inspired, consciously or unconsciously, by the work of Thomas Harris.

Do you prefer to write about what you know, or is it more fun when you have no idea where the story is taking you?


message 4: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 8 comments I like both options. Sometimes I like to write just for the sake of writing, and I'll have no idea where the characters will take me. If I'm doing something lengthy like a novel, I like to go from an outline I've plotted out.

Do you carry a small notebook (or a set of note cards) with you at all times just in case inspiration hits?


message 5: by Ella (new)

Ella Quinn (ellaquinnauthor) | 9 comments I started writing two years ago at the end of April. I had a Regency in me that had to come out.


message 6: by Michala (new)

Michala Tyann (michalatyann) Ella wrote: "I started writing two years ago at the end of April. I had a Regency in me that had to come out."

you forgot to add another question my friend. :)


message 7: by C.R. (new)

C.R. McBride (CRMcBride) | 10 comments I have 6 notebooks, 1 file and a jotter for all my ideas. All handwritten I am useless at technology I like my pen xx

How do you decide what ideas to use and what to save for another book?


message 8: by Ella (new)

Ella Quinn (ellaquinnauthor) | 9 comments Michala wrote: "Ella wrote: "I started writing two years ago at the end of April. I had a Regency in me that had to come out."

you forgot to add another question my friend. :)"


I need to stop responding through the email notices I get. I'll start all over.


message 9: by Ella (new)

Ella Quinn (ellaquinnauthor) | 9 comments readerorwriter wrote: "I have 6 notebooks, 1 file and a jotter for all my ideas. All handwritten I am useless at technology I like my pen xx

How do you decide what ideas to use and what to save for another book?"


So far I haven't had that problem, the ideas end up being subplots.

What writing program do you use?


message 10: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 25 comments I'm not sure what you mean by your question. All my writing is done first by pen to paper, then put into Word on my computer as I do my second or third rewrite and I continue with Word until I'm finally satisfied.

Q? Have you ever had a character take on a life of it's own and revise your original plotline?


message 11: by Ella (new)

Ella Quinn (ellaquinnauthor) | 9 comments L.F. wrote: "I'm not sure what you mean by your question. All my writing is done first by pen to paper, then put into Word on my computer as I do my second or third rewrite and I continue with Word until I'm f..."

That answered the question. A growing number of people are using things like Scrivner.


message 12: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 25 comments Ella wrote: "L.F. wrote: "I'm not sure what you mean by your question. All my writing is done first by pen to paper, then put into Word on my computer as I do my second or third rewrite and I continue with Wor..."

I tend to be technologically challenged :)


message 13: by G.E. (new)

G.E. Graves (binder) | 5 comments L.F. Yes, each one character took up writing the story, I became the data input device :)


message 14: by Ian (new)

Ian Thompson | 72 comments Mod
Personally I have a good idea where the book starts and ends. The characters as they develop will take you down differing paths and in my opinion that is good. If they stuck to a rigid structure then the are not real characters. Your friends, work associates etc only make your day interesting by doing unexpected things and that is how it should be.

My question.

What is the ideal word count for a first novel. Now e book has untethered that 75k word count print cost?


message 15: by G.E. (new)

G.E. Graves (binder) | 5 comments It is nice to have a plan. However, speaking for myself, I enjoy being surprised at each step of the book as it evolves :)


message 16: by Ella (new)

Ella Quinn (ellaquinnauthor) | 9 comments Ian, for the traditionally pubilshed, the word count is still controlled by the publisher, even for ebooks. In my genre, they are between 95,000 and 100,000, sometimes more.

How many revisions do you typically do before showing your book to your critique partner(s)


message 17: by Janeal (new)

Janeal Falor Typically, I write the story, then rewrite it, and then give it a once over before having a CP check it to make sure I'm going in the right direction. I hate sending something so unpolished, but it's worse when I polish up a bunch of things that will get deleted anyway.

Q: Do you usually write in the same genre?


message 18: by Ella (new)

Ella Quinn (ellaquinnauthor) | 9 comments I do. I write Regencies. Though the next series has 10 children, so I'm going to have include the early Victorian period as well.

Would you rather self-publish or be traditionally published?


message 19: by Shane (new)

Shane Scollins (shanescollins) | 1 comments I've been down both roads, and personally at this point in my career I prefer to work with a publisher. I work best as part of a team, and don't mind giving up some control in order to focus on the writing.

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Recent studies have shown that a growing number of readers (in pop fiction genres) prefer shorter length novels of between 50,000 and 70,000 words. Have you adjusted your writing style to fit that demand?


message 20: by Ian (last edited Mar 21, 2013 06:23AM) (new)

Ian Thompson | 72 comments Mod
I personally wonder if this is due to the elimination of fluff and the expectation of fast paced almost film like books. I can remember years ago as I struggled with Lord Of the Rings skipping countless pages knowing that nothing would happen. Maybe Frodo would sit and have a meal with a elf or two but nothing that moved the story forward. Recently I have found that I skip read less and less and this is probably a reflection of the author and editor of that work. If you can come up with a fast paced 150k novel then huge respect to you, but your publisher would probably want to cut it in two, or if SP you could get twice the money in a meagre world. So I aim for 80k words or so and hope that when it eventually will go to edit 10k will be chopped.I couldn't watch a six hour film version of Pulp Fiction no matter how much I love Tarrentino.

How do you know when you have nailed a scene and is that why we write?


message 21: by G.E. (new)

G.E. Graves (binder) | 5 comments I read a good book, and its the little things many skip over, are what really make it good. We each have what we enjoy, and i believe tend to write towards that :)


message 22: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lilly | 4 comments If a scene I wrote (or rewrote) the last time I was at the computer pulls me in to the point that I forget to edit or proofread and instead just read for the fun of it, I know I've nailed it. And yes, that's a big part of why I write.

What was your favorite book as a kid (say up to 12 years old), and do you think it influences what you write today?


message 23: by Jody (new)

Jody (foxinstarlight) | 1 comments Good luck with your book! I added it to my to-read list. :-)


message 24: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 25 comments Lisa, for me it would be almost impossible to choose ONE favorite book. I read and liked so many. But they all served to feed the "dream" of one day having others read my own stories, so in that way they all influenced me.

Q? What do you think is more important--plot or character?


message 25: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 8 comments A: I look up prompts online and have even used dictionary.com's word of the day to help me out. Once I get that first sentence in, the rest starts flowing.

Q: Have you ever spotted someone who looks exactly like one of your characters?


message 26: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Simmons (tracymillionsimmons) I don't know that I've found anyone who looks like one of my characters, but I often come across people who act like them. The other day in the grocery store I started writing down everything the man in front of me was purchasing. When my daughter asked me what I was doing, I said, "I'm not sure, but I have a character in my story who shops like that."

Q: Do you prefer in-person (irl) writing support groups or online writing support groups, and what do you see as the pros/cons of either or both?


message 27: by R. (new)

R. (rholland) | 18 comments I started writing in the middle of December 2012 and haven't stopped since.

Q: Why did you start writing or what made you want to be a writer?


message 28: by Shawn (new)

Shawn Reilly | 3 comments I am dyslexic and when I was in grade school my mom sent me to a retired teacher for tutoring. I not only learned that she had a book of short stories published, she said that she had a learning disability when she was younger.When my stepfather learned this and that I actually liked to read he took me to a bookstore and set me loose, and when I didn't like how the endings of a book went, he told me to write my own, so I did, and I haven't stopped.

My question.
I tend to get my inspiration from music and assign playlist for each book. Do you listen to music when you write or do you like things quiet so you can think?


message 29: by R. (new)

R. (rholland) | 18 comments Shawn wrote: "I am dyslexic and when I was in grade school my mom sent me to a retired teacher for tutoring. I not only learned that she had a book of short stories published, she said that she had a learning di..."

A: I almost have to listen to music when I write. It helps me write better. I can see things happening when listening to music. Not all music works the same. Some help me write a funny scene, an action scene or a sad scene. Only when I'm editing do I turn the music off.

Q:Would you rather read a long fully detailed novel, or do you prefer a shorter book that doesn't limit your view and allows you to see it the way you want?


message 30: by Carol (new)

Carol Bro (cjbro) | 8 comments Answer to Rolanda: No preference. If it's a good story it can go on forever and that's fine with me because I don't want it to end (like Outlander or World without End); but compact is fine too if the author made their point and it was time to end it, especially if it leaves me thinking about it long after I've finished.

My Ques.: What inspired your first novel -- the subject matter, the characters you chose?


message 31: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 25 comments The first novel I published was inspired by a random thought that emerged in my brain on the edge of sleep. I forced myself to rise and write it down, knowing full well it would be lost otherwise, and the following morning, a book began to grow. The characters and plot sprang effortlessly into life from the simple thought I hastily scribbled in the lamplight: "You're to stay away from Ganty," my ma always says. "'Tis no proper place for a girl to be." But little does she know that already my eye has taken a fancy to a fisher boy and I'll not shrug it away just to please my ma.


message 32: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 25 comments Sorry--I forgot to add my question :P

Q? What makes up the majority of your bookshelves? Fiction or Nonfiction? And why?


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