The BURIED Book Club discussion

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Great Heaps of LOST books

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message 1: by Nathan "N.R." (last edited Mar 10, 2013 11:56AM) (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments This thread, please post where's to go to find haystack-sized mounds of unread and forgotten and BURIED and ignored and DISRESPECTed books.

I find much to be found in the two volumes of Steven Moore's history of the novel. His list of Rabelaisiana I've reproduced in a review HERE, where lie many a BURIED name.

Unjustly Unread:
http://unjustlyunread.tumblr.com/

The Neglected Books Page
http://neglectedbooks.com/

Rediscoveries: Informal Essays in Which Well-Known Novelists Rediscover Neglected Works of Fiction By One of Their Favorite Authors & Rediscoveries II for which see THIS & THIS. [Thanks for which to Friend Eric for UNEARTHING]

My part, much of this UNEARTHING got itself Re:started with a volume of Wakean writing (cf also Sorrentino, Gass, etc), In The Wake Of The Wake.


message 2: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments I shall reproduce Friend Enrique's paragraph which was the final nail in the Coughin to create this group (names indicated need ADDing to our ToPICs and turned into TH[e]reads):

"Hey, where would be a good group to post a thread along the likes of, "Unknown Writers We Want to Expose," something like that? For writers like Paul Metcalf, William Eastlake, Steve Katz, Martin Nakell, Carole Maso, Rikki Ducornet, Nicholas Mosley, William Sansom, Henry Williamson, Evan Dara, Peter Weissman, John Domini, even a higher profile guy like Steve Erickson who rarely gets his due, ever since Burgess ruined the commercial potential of his career w/that pissy hatchet job of a review of Arc d'X in NYTBR. Or Ted Mooney for that matter? John Hawkes, Mark Axelrod, Raymond Federman (though I've seen very recently he's known & appreciated here in GR, unlike LT). And I've not even gotten to Latin America or the rest of the globe. The stuff Dalkey publishes. I'm rambling, but I know you know what I'm talking about. A group for the great unknowns who should be known, because the quality of their craft & prose should've made it automatic. Maddening, that it hasn't."
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 3: by Kalliope (new)

Kalliope | 15 comments I am not sure this is the thread to place a book suggestion.

I wish to draw attention to a book and author that seems forgotten, even if the author got a Nobel Prize and even if in his country he is very well known but unread..

In GR it has no reviews yet (I should reread it and write one then), and only 18 ratings (mine not there yet, but is a five).

It is recommended for animal lovers.

And to support the book, my car is called Platero. I only buy my cars of silver color so that I can call them Platero... So, it is always "Platero and I".

Juan Ramon Jimenez: Platero and I


message 4: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Kalliope wrote: "And to support the book, my car is called Platero. I only buy my cars of silver color so that I can call them Platero... So, it is always "Platero and I"."

Please to provide this nearBURIED guy a decent thread in which to be rediscovered? [and the goodreads data bank on this guy is in terrible straits; your link above goes to an edition in which the translator is named first and gives a false original pub date, etc]

It's got quite a few reviews:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/96...
Most from Spanish language classes? But the most rated ENGlish edition has only 25 ratings. Status: Still BURIED.


message 5: by Nathan "N.R." (last edited Mar 14, 2013 07:49AM) (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Enrique wrote: "At least three of the writers I mentioned are in fact GoodReads Authors."

Just hopin' you have/will add(ed) threads for those names dropped in your quoted passage (so far as they qualify under these unBELIEvable constrictions); excluding of course those books authored by authors who have their own already presence on goodreads, those authors who are still breathing just enough that we can't count them yet as BURIED--they will have to wait their turn. [Evan Dara we will let molder under the FC2 thread cuz his books, despite how awesome they HAVE to be, are really not yet aged enough to have been too BURIED. [but do read him]]


message 6: by Kalliope (new)

Kalliope | 15 comments Nathan "N.R." wrote: "Kalliope wrote: "And to support the book, my car is called Platero. I only buy my cars of silver color so that I can call them Platero... So, it is always "Platero and I"."

Please to provide this ..."


You are right Nathan.. What would you like me to do?.. I am still unclear about how you want to organize this.. I understand you are more interested concentrating it around Buried Books rather than authors.

I suppose first it is to edit my link and then see whether I can conflate editions.. (I have never managed to do the last one).


message 7: by Kalliope (new)

Kalliope | 15 comments Ok, edited that one and consolidated it with most of the others.


message 8: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments obfuscations wrote: "honestly no time to read & digest all the rules & procedures, though in great sympathy with the concept - so do i just throw suggestions out here and you will start a topic if deemed appropriate? ..."

Nope. This thread is NOT for that, despite having been used for that. I'm not taking requests. Add a thread in the appropriate folder (organized by author) if you think the book fits the criteria of BURIED. I'll delete your thread if I don't think it fits, so there's no need to read the rules and reg's.

THIS THREAD IS FOR HEAPS OF BURIED BOOKS; SOURCES AND RESOURCES; LISTS AND LISTS OF BOOKS YOU'VE NEVER FUCKIN' HEARD OF; JUST LIKE WHAT'S ILLUSTRATED IN COMMENT NUMBER UNO.


message 9: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Kalliope wrote: "Ok, edited that one and consolidated it with most of the others."

I made the thread, so give JMJ some just love over yonder, or c-n-p what you've said above.


message 10: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments obfuscations wrote: "Charles Olson 'The Maximus Poems'"
...would NOT appear to be BURIED.

Vance Bourjaily...
...WOULD appear to be buried.


message 11: by Kalliope (new)

Kalliope | 15 comments Nathan "N.R." wrote: "Kalliope wrote: "Ok, edited that one and consolidated it with most of the others."

I made the thread, so give JMJ some just love over yonder, or c-n-p what you've said above."


Done. Thank you.


message 12: by Jim (new)

Jim A listopia graveyard we might want to consider for exhumation, or at least a bit of poking around...

http://www.goodreads.com/list/show/18...


message 14: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Rand wrote: "User Wikimedia has listed many public domain texts on goodreads. Dunno how many are worth reading tho."

That's quite a list. Any suggestions about how to make sense of it? It would seem to be nothing but titles and authors with no way of making heads-nor-tails of what's therein contained.


message 15: by Rand (last edited Mar 19, 2013 10:16AM) (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments Well, Wikimedia seems to be a bot which dumped its content listings onto Goodreads. Sorting that list via rating would show which other users have read it, which yields such buried Bach scholars as Anne Leahy.

Wikimedia is an interesting but exhaustive index. They've listed a number of non-public domain stuff like Web Thinking and The Dostoevsky Encyclopedia (incidentally, Eleanor Roosevelt also has her own encyclopedia!

Donald Wandrei does poetry and speculative/horror fiction and should be added to the general listing. As should Phillip V. Tobias, Simone Weil, Béla Bartók, Milton Babbitt...

I'll sort through the list more laters and take out the technical stuff like Robot Dynamics and Control and the military history.
I really wish Goodreads allowed the option to sort lists by language. I suggested it to them already, but it seems that that is not a simple thing to do.


message 16: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments But the criteria for inclusion within the sacred halls of the BURIED Book Club extend beyond the mere low number of ratings. We are indeed after SNOBBISH things like LIT-UR-A-CHUR. There are certinly BURIED books within that list, just as there are within the databanks of goodreads and amazon and abebooks, but they are all MERELY databanks. Good luck.


message 17: by Rand (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments makes sense.

how about [Author: Angus Peter Campbell]? he seems to still be kicking but just relatively unknown outside of Scotland. I think that Wandrei is worth adding, as is Elizabeth Bisland.


message 18: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Rand wrote: "how about [Author: Angus Peter Campbell]? he seems to still be kicking but just relatively unknown outside of Scotland. I think that Wandrei is worth adding, as is Elizabeth Bisland. "

I don't know nothing about any of them. Merely as ratings, clearly, include them. I'd be interested to hear whatever glimmer you may have of their desserts for being UNEARTHED. About Wandrei, I'd ask whether his sci-fi transcends the mere genre, which he very well may, as do such as Vonnegut or the guy that wrote Dhalgren. Feed us!


message 19: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments This one might work as research for the THEN buried, now NOT folder. From 1956, “The Most Neglected Books of the Past 25 Years,” published in The American Scholar:

http://neglectedbooks.com/?page_id=50

Happy hunting!!!


message 20: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments The NEGLECTORINO PROJECT @ PhillySound focuses on neglected poets. I'm not a poetry reader, but you poetry readers, let us know if you DIG up something grand/great/fantastic.

http://neglectorino.blogspot.com/


message 21: by Nate D (new)

Nate D (rockhyrax) | 354 comments http://writersnoonereads.tumblr.com has lead me down many fruitfully twisty tunnels.


message 22: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Here's a HEAP I'm in the midst of and which will be cited more than once, but Gilbert Sorrentino's Something Said should be consulted as a source of unEARTHing activities, especially (so far) for those interested in the unEARTHing of POETS. I'll have more on this one in the shape of a REview in a few days.

Meanwhile, I've just finished his to-the-sky praise of Edward Dahlberg, who has been recognized as BURIED by Member Garima.

More to come....


message 23: by Nathan "N.R." (last edited Apr 28, 2013 01:18PM) (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Nathan "N.R." wrote: "but Gilbert Sorrentino's Something Said should be consulted as a source of unEARTHing activities, especially (so far) for those interested in the unEARTHing of POETS."

The guts of this book have been adumbrated over in a review of mine just freshly off the cyber-presses.
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... It might not be shovel-ready, but it'll give you a headstart until your own copy of Gil's collection of reviews shows up in your pre-paid post-box.


message 25: by Rand (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments French Books USA Cultural Services of the French Embassy lists several buried French titles, some of which have been translated (& some published by Dalkey).

Similarly, the US French Embassy's GR friend World Literature Today magazine lists a number of buried titles, among them Istanbul Was a Fairy Tale.


message 26: by Rand (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments Added the first New Directions anthology, Spearhead, into the GR database. Along with all forty contributors, many of whom are buried.

Will intermittently add on individual contributors by and by (tho should you be so inclined, please do so, especially if you recognize a name in that roster).


message 27: by Rand (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments Naturally enough, different people on GoodReads differ on what constitutes "widely read". Case in point: the GR list Unsung Works of Genius includes such canonical works as Faust, The Stranger, 100 years of Solitude
BUT
said list also contains the BURIED Alfred Assollant and the under-read Saadat Hasan Manto.
I found that list by looking for Christine Brooke-Rose in my local library, which lead me to the Oxford Book of Twentieth Century Ghost Stories which she is in (& the anthology is on that list)


message 29: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Rand wrote: "fellow travelers: http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/2..."

Indeed.


message 30: by Garima (new)

Garima | 78 comments We're sure to find some obscure writers/books from the following articles in NY Times and The American Conservative.

- The Best Books You Haven’t Read: http://amconmag.com/articles/the-best...

- Obscure Books Part I: http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/200...

- Obscure Books Part II: http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/200...


message 31: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Garima wrote: "We're sure to find some obscure writers/books from the following articles in NY Times and The American Conservative."

Thanks, Garima. I notice that the first link mentions William Carlos Williams' In the American Grain for which I have a review pending. It's not BURIED at 374 ratings, but WCW does have a novel trilogy which is BURIED, and an entry in the Unknown by the Known thread. The American Conservative should have mentioned Mano, but what are you gunna do?


message 32: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Ali wrote: "Over forty translators into English, most known for their releases of classic or elitist lit, describe an author or book they wish would be translated into English."

A testament to the massive task which lies before us, indeed. I can't say I recognize more than a few names. And by names I mean to also include the names of those 40+ Hero-Translators.


message 33: by Gregsamsa (last edited Aug 14, 2013 04:11AM) (new)

Gregsamsa | 94 comments Here here, Nathan! Translators are heroes. Heroes to the global hope of a common humanitay. There should be an (inter)national holiday named in their honor. But what would it be called?


message 34: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Gregsamsa wrote: "There should be an (inter)national holiday named in their honor. But what would it be called? "

Bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk=Day.

Or, instead of 'thunder', make it 'translated=by'.


message 35: by Gregsamsa (new)

Gregsamsa | 94 comments What it this "thunder" to which you refer with quotes as if it has already been mentioned? And I don't think that your, uh, interesting name proposal would fit on my Hot EMTs calendar so I cannot, in good conscience, support it.


message 36: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Gregsamsa wrote: "What it this "thunder" to which you refer with quotes as if it has already been mentioned"

Good Sir, 'tis the initial thunder=word of our most illustrious Finnegans Wake; one of the later thunder=words features 'whore', for exemplum; we might honor perhaps the Hero=Translator with a translated thunder=word which would resound through=out eternal history.


message 37: by Gregsamsa (new)

Gregsamsa | 94 comments Well I feel stupid now, was that your intent?? I HOPE YOU'RE HAPPY!


message 38: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments THE Book of THE Year has just been published ;; The Novel: An Alternative History, 1600-1800 by Steven Moore. You may have heard his name before ;; he is a member of the most Ancient ranks of The Order of the Spade=Wielders. He is a former editor at Dalkey Archive, responsible for Dis=Interring even unPUBlished masterpieces, such as Alfau's Chromos. The first volume of his novel history The Novel: An Alternative History: Beginnings to 1600 is fantastic.

But I've only begun. Reading the first section concerning the Spanish novel, recognizing how seminal was the Don Quixote ;; but then noticing how frequently was indicated the inadequacies of available English translations, using translations from the early 19th century, translations incomplete ;; one gets the picture of some fantastic stuff which belongs in the Please! tranSLATE BOOK shovel.

And for you list=hounds ;; those who recall that Moore list re:Rabelais I reproduced in my Rabelais review ;;; turn herein to page 813ff to find THREE(!!!) pages of a list, listing works for which Sterne's Tristram Shandy is somewhat culpable. (!!!!) So and too you'll find herein not only books of the dusty years 1600-1800 but also all those morsels of books which belong in a tradition associable with Dalkey and with Rabelais and with Sterne and with WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT BURIED BOOKS WORTH DIS=INTERRING, from all years of writing and reading.

Spade=Wielders who will pick up this second (or first!) Moore volume and find therein something whose stench of BURIAL is simply too appealing and sinks their steel into the turf to unearth ;; anything which inspires you herein, please to provide a citation of Moore's book. That's just for our easy reference.


message 39: by Rand (last edited Oct 13, 2013 03:46PM) (new)

Rand (iterate) | 99 comments A number of winners of the The Miles Franklin Literary Award may qualify for buried status. Good to know if you are keen on Australian fiction.

(tip of the hat to Ian Graye, whose championing of David Ireland led me down under.)


message 40: by Perifian (new)

Perifian | 17 comments I'm in possession of 'Poor Fellow My Country', whose fingers and nose protrude from a shallow grave; much like everyone's darling, 'Miss MacIntosh', similar title, it doesn't appear to be in very much danger of sinking deeper, on account of being gigantic, thus tantalising to some, and rather cheaply available.


message 41: by Aubrey (last edited Nov 08, 2013 11:53AM) (new)

Aubrey (korrick) Get your 'The 100 Greatest Novels Ever, as picked in 1898' here: http://timescolumns.typepad.com/stoth...

Listopia version here: https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/4...

Nearly twenty of these books have zero ratings, three of which (Jack Brag, Adventures of Mr. Ledbury, The Romance of War or the Highlanders in Spain) didn't even exist in the database before I made the list. Dig away.


message 42: by Zadignose (last edited Nov 19, 2013 03:47PM) (new)

Zadignose | 153 comments Alfred Jarry's novel Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician contains a list of 27 "equivalent" books which were confiscated from the doctor's shelves. Many of these are not lost or buried, but some may be, and several are not readily available in English translation. This list made me curious about Georges Darien's The Thief, which I assume is the same as this French language book: Le Voleur. And, by the way, that book appears to be available as a free Kindle book in French, from www.Amazon.fr Unfortunately, I don't read French. The notes to the English edition of Jarry's books refer to The Thief as "an astonishing and hitherto rare book, published 1898, has been republished by Jean-Jacques Pauvert (Paris, 1955).

The Complete List:

1. BAUDELAIRE, a volume of E.A. POE translations
2. BERGERAC, Works, volume II, containing the History of the States and Empires of the Sun, and the History of Birds.
3. The Gospel According to SAINT LUKE, in Greek.
4. BLOY, The Ungrateful Beggar.
5. COLERIDGE, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
6. DARIEN, The Thief
7. DESBORDES-VALMORE, The Oath of the Little Men.
8. ELSKAMP, Illuminated Designs
9. An odd volume of the Plays of FLORIAN.
10. An odd volume of The Thousand and One Nights, in the GALLAND translation.
11. GRABBE, Scherz, Satire, Ironie und tiefere Bedeutung, comedy in three acts.
12. KAHN, The Tale of Gold and of Silence
13. LAUTRÉAMONT, The Lays of Maldoror
14. MAETERLINCK, Aglavaine and Sélysette.
15. MALLARMÉ, Verse and Prose.
16. MENDÈS, Gog.
17. The Odyssey, Teubner's edition.
18. PÉLADAN, Babylon.
19. RABELAIS.
20. JEAN DE CHILRA, The Sexual Hour.
21. HENRI DE RÉGNIER, The Jasper Cane
22. RIMBAUD The Illuminations.
23. SCHWOB, The Children's Crusade.
24. Ubu Roi.
25. VERLAINE, Wisdom.
26. VERHAEREN, The Hallucinated Landscapes.
27. VERNE, Voyage to the Center of the Earth.

In some cases there are notes which might help me identify the books being referred to him.

And, by the way this reminds me: Why can't I easily find an English language version of Cyrano's writings? (I don't mean the Rostand play).


message 43: by Zadignose (new)

Zadignose | 153 comments Do you like randomness? Here's a bit of randomness:

The Catalogue of the Library of John Clerk of Eldin

It's just a title list of all the books in an individual's library which was put up for sale in the 19th century. He had books that were hundreds of years old in his collection. The first few days' worth of sales contained heaps of law texts... nothing of much interest to me. But if you browse around, you might find some interesting pointers to some literary stuff, and it's a guarantee that some of it would be buried treasure.

In fact, there must be tons of these historical catalogues out there, for anyone interested in raking through the muck.

I randomly stumbled upon
The Bruce, to add to my list (even though the version this dude had was a rewrite by John Pinkerton).


message 44: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 26, 2013 04:40PM) (new)

Z - your link appears to be going Korean Google. I'm sure I'll figure out how to get around it when I'm not on my phone, but figured I'd mention it.

ETA - NM, I stole my wife's laptop. English Google link:

The Catalogue of the Library of John Clerk of Eldin


message 45: by Zadignose (new)

Zadignose | 153 comments Oops.


message 46: by Gregsamsa (new)

Gregsamsa | 94 comments Pardon the repeat as I've posted the below elsewhere, but I'd like to draw attention to a shovel-sharpening tool of great facilitay:

SUGGESTION:

If a book you're after is out of print and online copies have inflationized to confiscatory price-levels, here is a handy tool to find out if any lending institutions near you have the book:

http://www.worldcat.org/

You may search by author, title, or ISBN, and when you do you can enter your city or postal code and get a list of libraries worldwide that currently carry the item, beginning with those nearest you, usually with a handy link to the libraries so you can check out their policies. If you can't borrow and it is short enough and rare enough and out of print, I encourage you to zoom to that institution, find the book, and stress its spine on the Xerox machine.

As an added bonus, you don't have to register to do this, although creating an account allows you to bookmark and archive etc.

Btw you may notice that WorldCat also lifts reviews from Goodreads, but does so in a way that, as far as I can tell, is content-neutral and unrelated to helpfulness or qualitay.


message 47: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments So Bibliomanic links to "American Fiction of the Sixties: A Complete Bibliography" at A Commonplace Blog. I link through Bibliomanic because there you'll find a few Important names not included in that complete biblio.

http://bibliomanic.com/fiction-of-the...

Chances are there may be another name new-to-us or two perhaps. At any rate, the '60's produced an awful lot of the books/writers I've enjoyed these past few years.


message 48: by Aubrey (last edited Mar 19, 2014 07:42PM) (new)

Aubrey (korrick) For fans of Alain-Fournier, the prize in his name is chock-full of BURIED, the list recently completed by yours truly: Le prix Alain-Fournier


message 49: by Nathan "N.R." (new)

Nathan "N.R." Gaddis (nathannrgaddis) | 985 comments Aubrey wrote: "For fans of Alain-Fournier, the prize in his name is chock-full of BURIED, the list recently completed by yours truly: Le prix Alain-Fournier "

At first glance everything would appear to be too recent to qualify as BURIED. A great HEAP of the OBSCURE and the FRENCH nonetheless. Merci!


message 50: by Geoff (new)

Geoff | 25 comments Aubrey, bonne découverte, merci!


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