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Rants: OT & OTT > WORD/QUOTATION of the DAY Resurrected

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message 1: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Happy New Year, everyone!!

Thought the first day of 2013 a good time to resurrect the old thread.

EXORDIUM

To begin; a beginning or introduction esp. to a discourse or composition

Yep, I know. Not exactly the proper use of either Resurrect (Here, rather than raising up the old thread, its proper use of the word, I have begun a new one), or Exordium (more properly the beginning of an argument in which a speaker or writer establishes credibility and presents the subject).


message 2: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
It sounds like one of those made-up words fantasy writers use for their empires: "Exordium, Blowhole of the Seweral Universe, where the Swordsmith of Oltestical could triumph or perish in the Shadow of the Colossus of Seum"... and further schoolboy puns without end.

Congratulations, Sharon. You've discovered a word no one else knows!

"Hold the pass, I'm coming. I'm only three Universes away. But they're Parallel, not end to end to end!"


message 3: by Katie (new)

Katie Stewart (katiewstewart) | 1099 comments Oltestical. I'll have to remember that for my next fantasy. All sorts of interesting things could happen there.

Oh. That's right. I don't write that sort of book. But I'd sell millions if I did!


message 4: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Kench!


message 5: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Ah, the fallout of a classical education...


message 6: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Jordan (kajordan) | 3042 comments Love it! I shall learn a new word every day.


message 7: by Katie (new)

Katie Stewart (katiewstewart) | 1099 comments I had a biology teacher when I was at school, who loved words. When I worked in the lab for a year before I went to University he used to come in to where I was working, lean dramatically against the door jamb and say, "I'm about to be expunged from existence!" Roughly translated that meant, "I'd love a cup of coffee!"


message 8: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Kench, Katie!

This was not the word I intended to post today, but it's a word I love for the way it trips off the tongue rather playfully, quite nicely describing itself...

DIPSOMANIA


message 9: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "DIPSOMANIA"

Compulsive pickpocketry.


message 10: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Only if there's a mickey in there...


message 11: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
This could get to be addictive.


message 12: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Jordan (kajordan) | 3042 comments An alcoholic?


message 13: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Dipsomanic.

A better version, considering that most drunks are on autopilot to destruction, would be:

DIPSOMATIC


message 14: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments I'll bite...


message 15: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
At least the alcohol will sterilize a vampire's bite.

In Our Twilight Years. Now there's a title I'm happy to give away.


message 16: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments I'm with you on that one, it's subjective anyway, who's to say when those years would begin?


message 17: by Katie (new)

Katie Stewart (katiewstewart) | 1099 comments DIPSOMATIC. Sounds like a washing machine!


message 18: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "I'm with you on that one, it's subjective anyway, who's to say when those years would begin?"

Twilight as a euphemistic metaphor is anyway contaminated with sacharine lupinery for a few decades now.


message 19: by Andre Jute (last edited Jan 06, 2013 12:10AM) (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Katie wrote: "DIPSOMATIC. Sounds like a washing machine!"

Kench!

I went with Roz on Thursday to shop for a new dryer after the handle broke off the door of our old Siemens. The woman in the shop recommended a Candy, which is apparently the name of the firm that owns Hoover. Talk of inappropriate names. Makes me think of Brighton Rock, not Graham Greene's book, but the candy stick with the deckchair stripes running up the inside, to be exposed by sucking on it. (I shall let the previous sentence stand as an example of a sentence loaded with subtexts, all of them confusing to those without the cultural references anglophones share.)


message 20: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Jordan (kajordan) | 3042 comments Yep - too cultural for me!

Kench!


message 21: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Andre wrote: "...Makes me think of Brighton Rock, not Graham Greene's book, but the candy stick with the deckchair stripes running up the inside, to be exposed by sucking on it. (I shall let the previous sentence stand as an example of a sentence loaded with subtexts, all of them confusing to those without the cultural references anglophone share.)"

Loaded is for sure!

Lupinery - I shall have to remember and borrow that...

Katie wrote: "DIPSOMATIC. Sounds like a washing machine!"

Kench!


message 22: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Jordan (kajordan) | 3042 comments Reprographics


Even the generic descriptor for this clump of skills and trades and professions and knowledgebases is weird and wonderful: reprographics.


message 23: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Andre is an old repro...


message 24: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Keeping stumm, otherwise Sharon will demand the salacious details.


message 25: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Pretty nifty, putting a cool word in your post.

SALACIOUS

Just saying the word makes one raise their eyebrows in a certain way...


message 26: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "Andre is an old repro..."

First to say "reprobate" loses the game.


message 27: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Then I guess you just lost, kench!


message 28: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Kench.


message 29: by Dakota (new)

Dakota Franklin (dakotafranklin) | 306 comments Sharon wrote: "Pretty nifty, putting a cool word in your post.

SALACIOUS

Just saying the word makes one raise their eyebrows in a certain way..."


Kench. And "repro..." is great too!


message 30: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments VICISSITUDE

I have been allowing the vicissitudes of life to impede my progress, but today I am using them to move forward with renewed vigour...


message 31: by Dakota (new)

Dakota Franklin (dakotafranklin) | 306 comments Congratulations on achieving wisdom.


message 32: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Thanks, Dakota. For the moment at least. But any wisdom I have gained is not

IRREFRAGABLE


message 33: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "Thanks, Dakota. For the moment at least. But any wisdom I have gained is not

IRREFRAGABLE"


Very CONDESCENDING of you, Sharon.

Tip: The American Plenipotentiary to the Court of St James says to Her Britannic Majesty as he bows over her hand, "Most condescending of you, Mam." It once meant something different from today.


message 34: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Andre wrote: "...It once meant something different from today.

As so many do...

Cool, Andre. I did not know the etymology of that word (so of course when I first read your comment, I thought, huh? how?).


message 35: by Andre Jute (last edited Jan 20, 2013 10:53AM) (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Once "condescending", rather than superior or arrogant, meant "gracious", someone who despite belonging to a superior degree was agreeable, perhaps even humble, as in admitting of the possibility of being wrong.


message 36: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
MOTILE

An amoeba slithering across glass


message 37: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Sounds like a perfect villian for the kinds of books that are popular just now...


message 38: by Andre Jute (last edited Jan 20, 2013 10:54AM) (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Hold your trifle plate at an angle and you can see the motility of jelly. (Technically, motile refers to the motion of single cells, so I assume appropriating it for jelly is wrong, as "single cells" implies animals and therefore "alive".)


message 39: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments I never trifle with jelly in my trifle...


message 40: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Kench.


message 41: by K.A. (new)

K.A. Jordan (kajordan) | 3042 comments A jelly trifle is nothing to trifle with...


message 42: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
description

Posted by my pedalpal Anto Kelly on another forum. So true.


message 43: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Found in one of Dakota's books:

Schadenfreude, noun, German, glee in someone else's misfortune


message 44: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Andre Jute wrote: "Found in one of Dakota's books:

Schadenfreude, noun, German, glee in someone else's misfortune"


I have several German friends, and have always loved that word. So expressive!

Here's a word which is also expressive, but unlikely in the way that comes to most minds:

PUISSANT


message 45: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments REJUVENESCENCE

The sunshine and walks in nature that come with the Spring always bring me rejuvenescence...


message 46: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "Here's a word which is also expressive, but unlikely in the way that comes to most minds:

PUISSANT "


One day I was in a conversation with a bunch of aggressive lesbians who caught me on the hop when I took a shortcut to the staff club at my college through the grounds of teachers training college. They were abusing me for being a man, which I though politically incorrect of them, but I smiled and called them "My dear," and when they left, fuming of course, a journalist standing nearby, newly arrived from England, assigned to fill in my minor movements for a profile written by a more important journalist, said, "Pissant? They called you a pissant? What's that?" It took me a moment of thought. "Ah. They were explaining to me that I have a powerful position in the media only because I'm a man. The word is puissant, pronounced in the local manner. You will also have heard rat-shit, which is wretched. There's a little column in the local mispronunciations. I can suggest to your editor that you be assigned to it."


message 47: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "REJUVENESCENCE."

EFFLORESCENCE the physical and metaphysical effect of rejuvenescence


message 48: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Andre Jute wrote: "EFFLORESCENCE the physical and metaphysical effect of rejuvenescence"

Perfect unfolding of REJUVENESCENCE.

Next...


message 49: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Tillotson (storytellerauthor) | 1802 comments Yes, Andre, I see how that could have given you pause. Pissant is pretty much the opposite of PUISSANT. However, one can see how someone could occasionally be both simultaneously...


message 50: by Andre Jute (last edited Mar 02, 2013 10:10AM) (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
For a linguist, I have terrific difficulty with accents — I speak every language with the equivalent of a standard received accent in English, because that's what I learned, mostly from girlfriends — and understand five or so different kinds of Spanish easier than I can understand a Yorkshireman... Odd. In Australia I was there a lot longer than the kid in the story above before Buzz Buzolich, who took an interest in Cockney slang and its Australian variants told me "rat shit" wasn't a particularly inventive Australian phrase for disapprobation but a mispronunciation of "wretched". I was a very disappointed...


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