Authors Lounge discussion

15 views
Misc. > Need some created profanity

Comments (showing 1-9 of 9) (9 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Tony (new)

Tony Talbot | 23 comments My WIP is set some time in the future - say 200 years or so. It's YA, but profanity doesn't bother me...what I want is some neologism profanity.

Something like Red Dwarfs "Smeg" or Judge Dredd's "Drok". I need some low level stuff - like "damn" and some higher level stuff like "f***"

I've done some internet digging and not come across anything that takes my fancy.

Also, what about alternative units of time, rather then second-minute-hour-day-week-month. I have years covered with "cycles", but I'm not happy with "twelfth" for a month and "seventh" for a day.

Go! (And thanks in advance!)


message 2: by Martin (new)

Martin Reed (pendrum) | 11 comments I'll let someone else tackle the profanity.

Possible names reflecting units of time:

Dial
Raster
Parse
Set
Sect
Node
Blink
Burst
Lapse
Junction
Rev
Phase
Sigma
Arc
Hertz
Hyper
Warp

Some of these are being used experimentally in my own WIP sci-fi, so if I end up seeing a critically acclaimed author going by the name of Tony sometime in the future using very similar terminology, I'll be sure to remember this thread.


message 3: by Tony (new)

Tony Talbot | 23 comments >>
critically acclaimed author going by the name of Tony
>>

I {blush} with your praise, sir!

Also, I like Dial and Parse :-)


message 4: by Jonny (new)

Jonny Gibbings (JonnyGibbings) | 18 comments Some surf slang works, as dude still is used.
Feck - obvious that one
Shiv - from prison term, will do you wrong n hurt you.
per - surf term. A shitty guy. comes from Raper
key/keys - from pikies


message 5: by Tony (new)

Tony Talbot | 23 comments I like Shiv and Per, I think I'll use those, thanks!


message 6: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Grey (greyauthor) | 34 comments I have the same problem, but in the ancient world. I've been able to skirt it by eluding to profanity, e.g., "he cursed"' but in general resorted to using modern profanity. Something made up deflates the impact. I'm writing the story in English, so it figures I would use translated profanity as well. In my experience using real words is not distracting but using fake ones are.


message 7: by Tony (new)

Tony Talbot | 23 comments Christopher wrote: "I have the same problem, but in the ancient world. I've been able to skirt it by eluding to profanity, e.g., "he cursed"' but in general resorted to using modern profanity. Something made up deflat..."

That's a tricky one; I know Victorian literature uses the initial-blank motid, "F-!", but that wouldn't work for a modern audience, would it?

I think most ancient mild profanity used variations of God, like Ounds, Zounds, Odd-bodkins. I think they kinda suck though.

I found this the other day, a Shakesperian insult kit:
http://www.pangloss.com/seidel/shake_...


message 8: by Jonny (new)

Jonny Gibbings (JonnyGibbings) | 18 comments Odd though that most of the swear words originate long ago. The C word (my fave) its origins is from the word 'cunny' form around 1230 and had the same meanings and use. Fuck first used in the early 1400's.


message 9: by Richard (new)

Richard Sutton (RichardSutton) | 110 comments Unless you're writing in a fantasy, created world scenario, why not curse in the language you;re writing in? Profanity is part of language. It adds accessibility to characters and immediacy to tense situations.


back to top