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A Diary's House
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Discuss A Diary's House with author C. David Murphy

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David Murphy (cdavidmurphy) | 10 comments Mod
Hello everyone! I just wanted to thank each of you for joining me in my blog tour group discussion. Needless to say this is an exciting time for me, since it is my debut novel and I have yet to do something like this before.

I want everyone (I would use the word ya'll - since I am from the south) to feel free to ask me any questions about the book, regarding myself, or writing in general.

As for me, I have a real passion for writing. I don't know what I would do without it. I suppose it has become as essential as eating or breathing.

But this also stirs the imagination in me, gives me the cause and reason to invent storylines, characters with something to say, and ultimately, I hope, will endear those who read my works to discover some joy, happiness and satisfaction with the work itself...

This novel bears a special legacy for me - it is in honor of a lost son; written for him, and I pray it bears a little of the spirit on the child that he was to me.

After all, I believe his heart truly lives in this story... Perhaps; just perhaps, if you read into 'A Diary's House' you will find him waiting for you as well...


message 2: by Marlene (last edited Sep 24, 2012 11:43AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Marlene (goodreadscomdigitalpubexp) | 1 comments David,

The following review captures the essence of A Diary's House beautifully. The Reviewer speaks of first love/true love, How were you able to evoke such an emotional response from this reader? What role does love play in the novel?

‘ Before I began reading ‘A Diary’s House’, I really didn’t know what to expect. I suppose the best way to describe it is, like anything you read, you make it personal for yourself. Well, that is the way it was for me. When reading this book and coming to the ending, I thought of my very first love when I was fifteen. I was young then (I am now in my fifties, a single mom of a twenty-three year old son) and I can’t tell you how much this novel made me remember a time so long ago, brought me to emotions I thought were lost or forgotten. This novel moved me to remember that time, and I never thought I would ever read a novel which would make me feel the way that this novel made me feel.

Frankly, it was an emotional experience. And not having any real expectations before I began reading it made it that much more powerful in the end. I thought about Landon Hampshire (the main character) and his journey, much more for the emotional and spiritual journey than going down the Randola River as he did. This was simply an antidote for the real heart in the story.

You won’t be disappointed in the end. I promise you. Everyone dreams of having real, true love, and ‘A Diary’s House’ delivers in every way on this element. The emotional impact drew me to tears, and made me weep for a boy and his grandmother, and how they took this journey, in some respects together – in a very, very special way. It was truly a moving experience unlike any novel I have read.

If you really want to read a true, true, true love story – read this book. It will have you thinking about life in a whole new way when you are done…’

Lynne S. – Charlotte, NC


David Murphy (cdavidmurphy) | 10 comments Mod
Hey Marlene...

I remember the conversation I had with Lynne after she read through A Diary's House. An avid reader heself, she possessed a great understanding and intuitive nature when reading through her genre, which historical romance/adventure held her greatest interest. I suppose in answering your question, it's really a matter of identifying with the reader on the human level - the connection the writer has to make utilizing the 'bridge of their words' or 'voice' to convey the common human equation to those who delve into the world you create. The characters must be real, honest; the circumstances and situations plausible & astute, or the reader will not venture into the story alonsgide the characters who are living out their lives in a novel.

Writers know that the characters they create are real to them; tangible, in human form, with feelings and emotions identical with ours. If the writer is involved with their story, engaging the reader at every turn, then the connection is made - the emotions are felt. And when the dramatic elements come into play, the reader feels the joys and sorrows along with the characters themselves....

It's what makes a novel special...

With regards to love - love can be defined in many ways and manners; all meanings coming back to the same, central focus on what true love really is....

The first parts to A Diary's House speaks of adventure; of lore and legends, of Cherokee tragedy and triumph...The diary weaves a universal world, though parallel and equal to the place that Landon finds himself in... He becomes the diary, as he feels the great sense the unidentified girl feels as she becomes the beautiful, caring, and loving woman she is later in the diary... Through this attachment, he knows, just like the reader knows in reading Landon's own story, that his world becomes hers', and the reader feels the engaging connection between her world in the diary, and his world in the novel...

In the end the story comes to a universal, sweet, loving and emotional display where the reader not only feels the joy and heartbreak Landon feels, but they also incur the joy and heartbreak of the woman in this diary....

True love does reign - in all things...this is the central message written in A Diary's House...


message 4: by Beth (last edited Sep 24, 2012 03:20PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Beth (bethlil) | 2 comments Beautifully written love story not only for Landon and the first young love but also with the enduring love of his Grandmother. So often we think that these loves are not serious and won't last but you've written of loves that should endure and that love that does endure


David Murphy (cdavidmurphy) | 10 comments Mod
thank you so much Beth...you are very kind...


Literary  Chanteuse David I am surprised here to discover this is your debut novel. As I described in my review your writing is captivating. I love the use of the Cherokee legend. Historicals that mix with some kind of legend or folklore give the story such depth and always seem to walk a fine line between fact and fiction. Is any of this legend based on fact? I also have to say I loved the "sinister minister". I love his name.

Thanks so much for allowing me to read the book. Wishing you much sucess!


David Murphy (cdavidmurphy) | 10 comments Mod
Hello Margaret...

Thank you so much for your very kind comments! I worked very hard on this story, and I gave it much love, care and dedication. It is very close to me and it always will be. I hope and pray the general readership will gravitate towards it tale, the values it presents, and the enduring message it renders in the end.

It has meant so much to me during this process. And it nearly never made it to publication. It has had a very long journey of over a decade before getting finally to this point...

'A Diary's House' is, in fact, my debut novel (one of three that are finished as of this post). North Carolina has had a very diverse history - from the coastal regions to the elevated peaks of the Smoky Mountains/Blue Ridge region. There are more stories I have in sketch which will be dedicated to this colorful history. 'A Diary's House' is a mesh and mixture on this state's unique and imcredible past. The sequel will address many more of these stories (a clue - the brown lights)- which is in process: 'The Long Journey Home'. This will be the second of three novels in Landon's vibrant adventures, but entails his life as a young man...

I would tell anyone who reads 'A Diary's House' to not presume that the story is quite so settled into what the reader's initially precepts might lead them to believe...far from it. There is much more to the story...

Now, as to your question...

The mythical elements on the Cherokee history told in storybook style by Landon's father is a story of my invention, but it draws from a culmination of ideas and handed-down tales the Cherokee relayed from generation to generation. It is in honor to their own stories, and sometimes very tragic history. Composed in the light and backdrop of how a true Cherokee tale might be drawn from, in the breath and scope of how a story might have very well been told.

I'm not an expert on Cherokee history, so I'll leave this to more apt scholars, but I really wanted to capture the abiding essence of the Cherokee people.

The beginning and ending are in fact tied together, entwined from 'the birth of a legendary tale' to the 'finality of what occurred at the beginning to the Trail of Tears'.

It was a heartbreaking scenario which will be more interwoven with the second novel.

Pirates also play an important role in NC history - as with the location of Blackbeard close to the outerbanks (i.e. Captain Finnegan).

In truth, 'A Diary's House' is a southern 'quilt stitching' of a wonderful tale regarding my home state's wonderful history...

I have been told there are similarities to Charles Frazier's 'Cold Mountain'. I will be posting a review of his novel within the next few days, as well as an in-depth review of my own novel - 'A Diary's House'...

The similarities are quite limited, but for the backdrop and time period both novels are drawn from. In truth, 'A Diary's House' was written long before I had even heard of 'Cold Mountain' (circa date 2000-2001)

But there is one stunning similarity in which I will address in the upcoming reviews...one which really shocked me when I read it through 'Cold Mountain'.

The world of two novels may, in fact, be somehow connected afterall - perhaps the breath and mystery to these mountains speak their mysterious tales in very subtle ways to all of us writers who are intimately exposed to this enchanting land...

Lastly - Sinister Minister - my father was actually a presby minister, and I certainly don't take lightly my Christian upbringing - it seemed to be a boyish whim on my part to make this unruly character the 'scapecoat' to my conflict...

With regards,

David


Literary  Chanteuse Being a fellow presby myself I can relate lol. Cold Mountain is still sitting on my shelf yet to be read....I'm inspired and must read it very soon.


message 9: by David (last edited Oct 02, 2012 09:04PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

David Murphy (cdavidmurphy) | 10 comments Mod
Hello everyone - I just wanted you to take a look at my 'official review' of 'A Diary's House' I wanted to get your thoughts on it.....

"When a writer comes to review their own work, it becomes a tenuous ground to stand on. Any relevant praise will be considered bias if but for the mere lack of constructive criticism that a normal review may ultimately garner. A balanced, even approach is quite often required to fully encapsulate such a work in its correct lighting.

I was reluctant to do as such for the aforementioned reasons above. I would press upon any reader/reviewer to relate and simply understand the immense task and required thought process to weave, incorporate & invent a storyline as complex a novel as ‘A Diary’s House’ would entail. This is no ordinary novel…

You may often hear the terms ‘wordy’ or ‘long’ with some of the reviews, but hardly will you here the word ‘unjustified’ behind it. Simply put, to create and intertwine the vast nature of two worlds as I made an attempt to do so in this novel – it simply required such lengths in order to instill the gravity this particular story required.

Add to the flair a literary tone & narrative style (of a consummate ‘Victorian ingredient’) created and invented from this particular era in order to bring more realism to the story, it becomes a daunting task to achieve. As a writer, I have always pushed myself and challenged the nature of the written word – in order to create a world and vision unique to my ‘voice’. Most writers garner and value commercial success. I seek to bridge the quality of writing with imaginative elements to induce the common-day reader to join with me ‘for the ride’. Commercialism can give you a ‘vanilla’ taste, and in truth this may bring great satisfaction to many common readers of today. But I also want to press the reader as I press myself in writing mode & movement, to think alternatively to what they are used to; to invent their own imagination from a manifold they would not think of otherwise.

Look at the same reviews and in the end, the reader feels justified in making the effort to read this story, and also having a real & true satisfaction when the ending came. Abstract and/or art; verse & prose or relegated, toned-down word usage; the story still sits in the bed of these book covers. In the end, the story is what sweeps the reader to explore & indulge within those fantasies. I feel ‘A Diary’s House’ measurably prevails to give the reader such an engrossing tale to ‘snuggle into’ & grow within the story itself.

‘A Diary’s House’ can be conveyed in a thousand different ways and in a thousand different formats – each reviewer/reader has a specific & opinionated view on which best serves their ‘likes’ in reading styles & manuscripts. One that serves the ‘goose’ for one, will not serve the ‘gander’ for the other. It is simply impossible to please everyone’s likes and avoid their ‘dislikes’ in revealing a singular story. The parameter is just too large to evade criticism and incur praise all in the same moment. A paradox of variable reviews will ultimately ensue…

I ask the reader/reviewer to not be so enclosed, but to venture out a little and come out of their traditional comfort zone – in the end, I believe, you will be greatly rewarded. To harness constriction will only distort an enhanced & overall viewpoint that will ultimately evolve if one is exposed to such works.
Before there was a ‘Mark Twain’, was there a ‘Mark Twain’; had anyone heard of a ‘Mark Twain’? And if ‘Mark Twain’ had not made a difference in the world, would the world be a lesser place for it?

There are many great writers of the past, and for this reason alone we should hold their works in high regard; after all, they’ve stood the test of time and previous generations thought highly enough of such gifted writers to place with them a literary life which will endure.

My general consensus is we owe the current literary writers, who have true art in value with the written word, the identical care and consideration. After all, will there never be another ‘Mark Twain’ of ‘Jane Austen’ to rise in the current-day fields of the literary world – that is for us, as consummate readers, to manifest and cultivate for our generation, and for the ones to come…

If you feel compelled by the brief storyline of ‘A Diary’s House’, you will not be disappointed in the final outcome this novel creates. Rather, as one reviewer stated, it might bring to you the ‘Wow’ factor. If so, then your initial intuition will hold true. And you will find real value in reading ‘A Diary’s House’. As much value as I received in writing such an enduring story…"


message 10: by Beth (new) - rated it 5 stars

Beth (bethlil) | 2 comments I would hope that the reader of your book will stick with it long enough for the story to surround them and let them experience the charaters and what they do and feel. It took awhile to draw me in but once there it was worth every minute of it. What an experience!


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