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Movies, DVDs, and Theater > Movie: "Good Night, and Good Luck" (re Edward R. Murrow)

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message 1: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 06, 2009 07:40PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments One of my first Netflix rental DVDs was "Good Night, and Good Luck", about Edward R. Murrow. I enjoyed it very much and thought it was excellent.

My only criticism was that the dialogue was too fast and the lines overlapped each other. I know that's a style which is supposed to be realistic, but I find it very annoying.

Below is the IMDb web page for the movie: ====>
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0433383/

Any comments about the movie?


message 2: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckymurr) I liked it very much, thought it was very realistic & the smoking made me hack !! LOL
It was awhile ago that I saw it so I am not sure about the dialogue thing you mentioned....


message 3: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Hi Becky. I had to keep rewinding to catch some of the dialogue, even though I had captions running. There wasn't even time to read the captions because the dialogue was so fast. I know it's a device to lend reality to the scene, but it's very annoying.


message 4: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Since I talk very fast, I didn't even notice it, ... interesting.
I thought it was a very good movie. Edward R Murrow had guts, the kind that people do not have nowadays. He was a true hero, where it counts.


message 5: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "Edward R Murrow had guts, the kind that people do not have nowadays. He was a true hero, where it counts."

On TV, he was mesmerizing.
I wish he were around today.


message 6: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "Since I talk very fast, I didn't even notice it, ... interesting."

Jackie, perhaps if I didn't have the captions on, I would have just let the movie keep rolling. However, when the captions are on, I try to read them while the performers are speaking the lines. I hate to miss a word.


message 7: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Joy wrote: I wish he were around today.

I wish a lot of men with integrity were around today, men like Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson for starters. History is full of men like them, I wonder why we don't have any for this particular time period.




message 8: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 07, 2009 08:33PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "I wish a lot of men with integrity were around today, men like Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson for starters. History is full of men like them, I wonder why we don't have any for this particular time period."

I wonder how those men would have fared if they were up against today's media coverage. (g)


message 9: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments They'd probably be ridiculed, jailed, or assassinated.


message 10: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments LOL ! You're probably right, Jackie.
You covered all the possibilities.
We have really idealized these men of history.
The days of idealization are over, I'm afraid.
Too many cynics.

"Idealism is what precedes experience; cynicism is what follows."
-David T. Wolf (1870-1916) Scottish short-story writer

"No matter how cynical you get, it is impossible to keep up."
-Lily Tomlin


message 11: by Don (new)

Don (ddonofrio3) | 86 comments People like them are around, they just aren't willing to play the media whore role that's a part of politics today.

People like Franklin and Jefferson realize that most of what today's politicians do is both unconstitutional and unethical.

"Mr. Smith Goes To Washington" is a great movie too but Mr. Smith would be squashed like a bug today, before he ever got to Washington, and Edward R. Murrow would never get on TV today.

Kirsten Gillibrand is no Mr. Smith but just look at her example. She wasn't expected to get appointed to the Senate, Caroline Kennedy was. If not for Kennedy's supposed nanny tax issue, she would've gotten the job. Gillibrand got the job through a fluke of politics and the first thing she did was go to NYC, meet with a hispanic group that was complaining about her appointment, and promptly reverse her view on illegal immigration to appease them. How can anyone say with a straight face that they support "illegal immigration"? It's ridiculous.

People with integrity in today's world have to work in obscurity, behind the scenes, and just try to make small changes where they can.

I can't work within today's political climate. I try to get things done with non-profit groups and do other things outside of the view of Big Brother. Our government actually goes out of their way to prevent people from doing any good.

Two of the most honest politicians today are Ron Paul and Dennis Kucinich. Both ran for President in 2008, one in each party, and both were portrayed as nuts by the mainstream media. Both were given very little time during debates and the time they were given was usually to respond to attacks on them from the other candidates. You can't win like that.

I supported Ron Paul and even campaigned for him in New Hampshire and New York. I was even lucky enough to meet and speak to him in New Hampshire. Ron Paul understands the Constitution, the federal government's role, and the economy. When he spoke of any of those three he was ridiculed by people like Mitt Romney and Rudy Guiliani, neither of which I believe has ever even read the US Constitution.

Thomas Jefferson warned us over 200 years ago about the exact problem that we have with the banks today. No one listened then and the only ones listening now are portrayed as nuts.

When the Federal Reserve Chairman testifies to Congress, Ron Paul is the only one that goes after him with any tough questions. Where are the rest of Congress? It's actually embarrassing to watch them sit there and say nothing.




message 12: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Don,
Perfect analysis. It's criminal, what this country's representatives have become. Maybe there is someone out there with integrity, but working in obsurity ensures that nothing will be accomplished, and that's just as usefull as having none.

Joy,
I don't see it as cynicism, but a dose of reality. Americans have a habit of seeing through rose-colored glasses when it suits them, ignoring anything uncomfortable, and being just plain self-absorbed. It's not wonder we have the politicians that we do; no one has paid attention or made an effort to stop them. At this point, though, Don is right, the political machine is too powerful for individuals to go up against. As long as we stay a divided nation, nothing will change or get better.
And knowing human nature as I do, we will always divide ourselves by something, real or imagined.


message 13: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 08, 2009 07:04AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments I like to listen to Lou Dobbs go on about all of this. Have you watched him? I wonder if the politicians pay any attention to him.

I don't know what side he is on politically, but he seems to make sense. However, there is so much to know before we can judge any political or economic situation, that it's difficult to assess what's right and what's wrong. Each side is so persuasive in its arguments.


message 14: by Jackie (last edited Feb 08, 2009 07:19AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments It's not difficult for me. I have an ability to see through the BS and it's never failed me.
Mostly, it's common sense, something our government officials have a serious lack of.


message 15: by Don (new)

Don (ddonofrio3) | 86 comments Joy,

Lou Dobbs got some latitude from CNN because he was already a well-respected person in the business news world and because he was mainly criticizing George W. Bush's administration, which already had so low of a public opinion that his criticism was seen as okay. If he tries to continue in the same vein with Barack Obama he will be reined in though.

Jackie,

I disagree that nothing will be accomplished. I accomplish a lot in my own community and none of you know who I am or what I even look like. I usually deflect any media attention to one of the groups that I work with instead.

Sure, I won't accomplish anything on a federal level because I barely acknowledge the federal government's existence anymore. If the government cuts funding to food banks or other groups in my community that help people, I don't waste my time screaming into the wind anymore, I find a way to help the local groups make up the difference. That may not be anything in the big picture but it certainly is in the small one. The big picture is an abstract thing. The small picture is where the real accomplishments are made.


message 16: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "It's not difficult for me. I have an ability to see through the BS and it's never failed me.
Mostly, it's common sense, something our government officials have a serious lack of."


Jackie, can you honestly say that you understand all the stuff they're talking about when it comes to economics and banking... and the effects of each different policy? For example, should the gov. put money into helping the banks lend money at a cheaper rate or should the gov. spend money creating jobs? Common sense would seem to dictate that the gov. should do both. But I'm not sure that's what's being done. I can't keep track of all the pros and cons. When I try to delve deeper by reading and listening to the opinions of the economists, my eyes glaze over. So I doubt if common sense is enough. There are things that need the expertise that common sense may not have.


message 17: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I help out in my community also, but I don't see it as political or anything to do with the government. The changes I was referring to were governmental. I should have been more clear.
In truth, we are all we have on the community level: each other. Can't hold our breath waiting on the government.
I love it when you said: I barely acknowledge the federal government's existence anymore.
I feel the same way.


message 18: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Don, your ideas remind me of one of my favorite quotes:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"It is better to light one little candle than to curse the darkness."
-Source unknown
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Onward and upward!
Keep up the good work, Don.


message 19: by Jackie (last edited Feb 08, 2009 08:26AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Joy,
Yes, it doesn't take much to realize that giving mortgages at cheaper rates to people who cannot afford them got the banks, and people, into trouble in the first place.
And it doesn't take much to realize that creating jobs in the private sector is the step in the right direction to stimulating the economy. We need to make money to spend money.
I don't need to listen to all the 'experts' talking mumbo jumbo, trying to confuse me.


message 20: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments LOL - It does sound like mumbo jumbo, doesn't it, Jackie.
Haven't heard that term in a long time. I like it!

Found this:
mumbo jumbo - 1738, name of an idol supposedly worshipped by certain tribes in Africa; said to be a corruption of words in Mandingo (one version is Mama Dyumbo), but no likely source has been found in the languages of the Niger region, to which the original accounts relate. Meaning "big, empty talk" is attested from 1896.
FROM: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?t...

ORIGIN from Mumbo Jumbo, the supposed name of an African idol.
FROM: http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/...

Etymology: Mumbo Jumbo, a masked figure among Mandingo peoples of western Africa, Date: 1738. FROM: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictio...


message 21: by Jackie (last edited Feb 08, 2009 08:50AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I love this Joy! You sure have a knack for finding info quick!

Yes, it sure does sound that way. maybe we should call it Mumbo Dumbo!

It really doesn't matter what I think anyway, what I know or can sense. In the end, my opinion, thoughts, feelings have no bearing on the outcome of whatever our government is going to do. They do what they want every time anyway. They like to complicate things, I think, LOL



message 22: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 08, 2009 08:54AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "I love this Joy! You sure have a knack for finding info quick!
Yes, it sure does sound that way. maybe we should call it Mumbo Dumbo!
It really doesn't matter what I think anyway, what I ..."


LOL - Mumbo Dumbo! LOL - Very good, Jackie. I laughed out loud. You should send that to Lou Dobbs! (lol)

So true that it doesn't matter what we think. Once we've voted, it's out of our hands... unless we march on Washington DC. LOL - I ain't marchin' no where at this point. I'm limping as it is. (g)

PS-As you can see, I'm really into WORDS! (g) I'm a word junkie.


message 23: by Jackie (last edited Feb 08, 2009 08:57AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments You can send to Lou Dobbs if you want. This is a collective effort here. It was your "Mama Dyumbo" that made me think of it.


message 24: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 08, 2009 09:37AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments OK, I just sent it to Lou Dobbs via his online contact form. I wrote:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I enjoy your program, Lou. My friend and I were discussing the "mumbo jumbo" which we hear on TV in general about economic and political policies. Someone remarked that we should call it "mumbo dumbo". You can use that on the air if you'd like.

BTW, "mumbo jumbo" means "big, empty talk", according to the dictionary at:
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?t.... "

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

PS-Jackie, interesting the way you got the idea. (g) Funny how one thing leads to another.


message 25: by Don (new)

Don (ddonofrio3) | 86 comments Here's all you need to know about economics;

In the mid 1980s, people were petrified when President Reagan ran our national debt to $1 Trillion. No one knew how we would ever pay that debt because it was so huge.

Today, our national debt is $12 Trillion and last year Congress passed the banker bailout that added another $1 trillion to our debt in a single day. Right now they are arguing over adding another $1 Trillion to our debt in another single day.

We still haven't paid off Reagan's first $1 Trillion.

If you can see the problem here, then you already understand more about economics then our Federal government does.

In 1776, the main reason we declared our independence from England was that we were being taxed without representation.

We will never pay our current debt. It will be passed to future generations.

Aren't those future generations being taxed without representation right now?

That's the problem that will eventually lead to the end of our federal government.


message 26: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 08, 2009 02:07PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments I see your logic, Don. Yes, one might see it that way.

Tell me this... The Republicans say that lowering taxes for the rich (and/or big business) is the way to help the economy.

The Democrats say that lowering taxes for the middle class (and/or small businesses) is the way to help the economy.

Who is right?

NOTE: I'm not sure that my facts above are correct, but at least it will start a discussion. (g)


message 27: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckymurr) Joy-can you tell me what this means? (g) thanks....


message 28: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 08, 2009 02:28PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Becky wrote: "Joy-can you tell me what this means? (g) thanks...."

I'm referring to the effects of taxes on the economy.
Can you add to this discussion?

I hear debates about how Obama plans to tax the different areas of the population and business. What are the pros and cons?


message 29: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckymurr) I am talking about this symbol that you add (g) I am not familiar with it...


message 30: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments OH! LOL (laughing out loud)
(g) means (grin).

There are others:
means "very big grin".
LMHO means "Laughing my head off".
D&R means "Ducking and running".
DARFC means "Ducking and Running for Cover".
IIRC means "If I remember correctly".
AFAIK means "As far as I know".

This type of thing is common on the newsgroups.

There's a webpage for Internet Acronyms here: ====>
http://www.gaarde.org/acronyms/?lookup=A

Sometimes you can find answers at: ====>
http://www.acronymfinder.com


message 31: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckymurr) I know the others but I have not seen the (g) used in the groups I am on-thanks for clearly that up for me LOL


message 32: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 08, 2009 06:35PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Becky wrote: "I know the others but I have not seen the (g) used in the groups I am on-thanks for clearly that up for me LOL"

One poster at one of my newsgroups uses the following,
without the dashes: <-s-> (to mean smile)
When I tried it here without the dashes, I found out
that it means "stike text", as follows:
This text is crossed out.

Live and learn! (g)


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