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How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character
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Recent Releases > 'How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character' by Paul Tough

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Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 95 comments Just finished reading Paul Tough's new book called 'How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character'. The book explores the character traits that lead to success, and how we can cultivate them in young people. It's a game changer. I've written an executive summary of the book available here:

http://newbooksinbrief.wordpress.com/...

Cheers,
Aaron


message 2: by Betsy, co-mod (new)

Betsy | 1669 comments Mod
This is currently #19 on Amazon's best seller list, all genres.


Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 95 comments Betsy wrote: "This is currently #19 on Amazon's best seller list, all genres."

Yeah, it's a huge seller. It's been on the 'New York Times' Best Seller list for weeks as well. And for good reason. The book makes a very powerful argument for the importance of character and a compelling look at the science behind it.


message 4: by John (new)

John (johnglassie) | 13 comments Paul Tough is really good. He also wrote about the Harlem children's zone:
Whatever It Takes Geoffrey Canada's Quest to Change Harlem and America by Paul Tough


message 5: by Dana (new)

Dana (oddodddodo) | 23 comments I'll probably have to read it at some point, but there is one sticking point for me. A former student of mine, Elizabeth Spiegel (formerly Elizabeth Vicary, which may be how she is identified in the book), is featured in one chapter because of her incredible work as a chess teacher/coach at I.S. 318 in Brooklyn. But I'm afraid to see her turned into a cardboard figure, illustrating whatever the author's pet ideas are on how to motivate kids. If someone can read that chapter and tell me whether Paul Tough captures her as a real person, it would help me a lot in deciding whether to read the book.

In general, have any other members of this group had friends who were profiled in a non-fiction bestseller? Did it help or interfere with your enjoyment of the book to actually know the person the author was writing about?


Aaron Thibeault (thebookreporter) | 95 comments Dana wrote: "I'll probably have to read it at some point, but there is one sticking point for me. A former student of mine, Elizabeth Spiegel (formerly Elizabeth Vicary, which may be how she is identified in th..."

Hey Dana. I thought that Tough did a great job of capturing Elizabeth Spiegel as a real person (in fact, I developed a bit of a crush on her in the course of reading : )


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