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Reading Recommendations > Can anyone recommend some great fantasy series' I might like?

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message 1: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Pugh | 7 comments I loved Song of Ice and Fire, Kusheil's Legacy, the Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit, and the Mists of Avalon. I started reading the Eye of the World but for some reason I just couldn't get into it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!


message 2: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Hi Melissa! Welcome to FA.

I would suggest checking out our list of "Top 100 Fantasy books" here: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/7...


message 3: by Kevin (new)

Kevin | 284 comments Melissa wrote: "I loved Song of Ice and Fire, Kusheil's Legacy, the Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit, and the Mists of Avalon. I started reading the Eye of the World but for some reason I just couldn't get into it..."

These are my favorite fantasy series:

A Trial of Blood and Steel series by Joel Shepherd starting with Sasha.
A lesser known series that I think deserves more attention than it gets. You follow a young and engaging female protagonist in a low magic world as she struggles with civil war, conflicting loyalties, and being a female warrior and leadership figure in a strictly patriarchal culture. (A bit like Song of Ice and Fire, but a bit smaller in scope, not as grim, and without dragons.)

The Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson starting with Mistborn: The Final Empire.
The prophesied hero has failed. The dark lord has won. Fast forward 1000 years. A group of master thieves is hired by a rebel leader to help him stage a coupe to overthrow the dark lord and end his reign. A young street rat is caught in the middle of all this and discovers that she might be meant for more. Or is she? Nice subversion of genre tropes while having one of the most kick-ass fun magic systems in the genre.

The Farseer trilogy by Robin Hobb starting with Assassin's Apprentice.
A child, said to be the crown princes bastard is brought to the royal castle and trained by the king's spymaster/assassin as his replacement. An introspective character driven series with a meandering style. Not a fast action book. One of my absolute favorites. If you like this, there are plenty more books in this universe, including another trilogy with the same main character.

The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie sarting with The Blade Itself.
If you like a Song of Ice and Fire, chances are good you'll like this too. It's fantasy in the same grim and bloody vain. Magic is part of legends and ancient history for most people. Maybe a bit thin on plot and world building, but the great characters more than make up for it. At first glance this seems pretty straight forward quest fantasy. The wise wizard gathers a party, consisting of his apprentice, the noble barbarian, the dashing young hero and the plucky female rogue and sends them on a quest for an ancient artifact to defeat an ancient evil. It becomes clear fairly quick that things aren't the way it seems however, and nothing quite works out as they expect. The 2 standalone novels in this same world are even better than this trilogy and a third is coming out later this year.

Another series I love, but isn't finished yet, is Patrick Rothfuss' the Kingkiller Chronicle starting with The Name of the Wind.
The legendary hero of many a tale Kvothe Kingkiller, or Kvothe the Arcane, or Six-string, or the Bloodless, or any number of other names, lives a quiet and anonymous life as an innkeeper when he is tracked down by a chronicler seeking to record his story. He proceeds to do so and relays his life story over the course of three days (one for each book in the series) revealing that the truth is often less, and at the same time more, than legend. This series is IMO and absolute marvel of wordsmithing and layered story telling. Due to it's setup, Kvothe telling various adventures of his young life in chronological order, the story is episodic doesn't really have a single plot thread. There are however many hints and tips and hidden layers that point at some overarching secret that will be revealed (hopefully) in the yet to be released third and last book of the series.


message 4: by Naiya (new)

Naiya | 13 comments To add to Kevin's suggestions, you might also enjoy books by Robin Hobbs, starting with Assassin's Apprentice.


message 5: by Patrick (new)

Patrick I will second (third, actually) Assassin's Apprentice (1st book in Robbin Hobb's Farseer trilogy). It is a very character driven book, and I think Hobb has some serious issues with plot/endings in general, but this was a book I read just to see what the character's life was like. The plot was just icing on the cake.

If you like Tolkien, you may want to try Guy Gavriel Kay, starting with Tigana. I suggest reading the first chapter or so before buying it to see if you like the voice, but if you do don't expect to have any idea what is happening by reading that first chapter.

Brandon Sanderson and Joe Abercrombie are decent. I would recommend Sanderson for plot and general story-cohesiveness, while Abercrombie seems superior in terms of voice and has a bit of dry/dark humor running under his work that I happen to enjoy.
I will disagree with KevinB and say that Abercrombie is nothing like Martin, however, as Abercrombie is very much a fantasy writer while Martin comes off as a historical fiction writer who happens to write fantasy. Also, The Blade Itself really isn't that dark in general because of the aforementioned humor setting it off. If you like the historical element of Martin and how he sets up his worlds, you'd find that more in Robbin Hobb than any of the authors here that I recognize.

If you want something more urban as a break from fantasy worlds, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell and Anansi Boys (I personally preferred American Gods to Anansi Boys, but it wasn't quite as well structured).

If you want more recommendations outside of the vein of epic fantasy, I can find more. I unfortunately have not read a lot of particularly good epic fantasy lately.


message 6: by Scott (new)

Scott | 16 comments Hi Melissa,

I like to read series that are already finished so I can read them all back to back without waiting on the latest book to come out. I agree that the Wheel of Time can take a while to really get hooked on, and even then you have to have some patience, but it is still one of my favorites.

Some other favorites are …

Codex Alera & The Dresden Files - Jim Butcher
Green Rider - Kristen Britan
Graceling series - Kristin Cashore.
Mistborn series - Brandon Sanderson
Sword of Truth - Terry Goodkind
Tairen Soul -C. L. Wilson


message 7: by Brenda (new)

Brenda Clough (brendaclough) | 197 comments I always point fantasy readers to CURSE OF CHALION, by Lois Bujold. You will of course have looked at the Harry Potter books? There are some dynamite fantasy series in YA. The Bartimaeus books by Jonathan Stroud are crack between book covers, utterly addictive.


message 8: by Pickle (new)

Pickle | 13 comments I recommend The Lies of Locke Lamora. I think its one of my favourite fantasy books to date


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 5387 comments Hi Melissa...somehow everyone has managed to miss the best fantasy series out there (except possibly Lord of the Rings of course), and everyone who knows me knows what's coming, LOL.

The Deed of Paksenarrion

I always note that this says it's vol. 3-5 but what they call vol.1 and 2 are really prequels and not part of this trilogy.


message 10: by Emily (last edited Oct 20, 2012 08:55AM) (new)

Emily | 95 comments Great recommendations here-lots of people beat me to Robin Hobb, Guy Gavriel Kay, George RR Martin, Susanna Clarke, Jim Butcher and Patrick Rothfuss (which I only mention to second those recommendations).
I would add Ken Scholes to the list. I just finished Lamentation and thought it was wonderful and original.
Also, Daniel Abraham's Long Price Quartet (first book is A Shadow in Summer ) is finished and amazing. His writing just gets my heart pounding.
One more-Garth Nix's Sabriel is great and can be read as a standalone or the first of the series if you enjoy it. That one is a young adult novel.


message 11: by R.M.F. (new)

R.M.F. Brown | 72 comments It might be cliche, but Moorcock's Eternal champion series is worth a look. Elric is already mentioned on this forum's 100 best fantasy books, but there are loads of others in the series which are worth a look.

Does Stephen King's dark tower series count as fantasy or is that more sci-fi?


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 5387 comments I'd call it fantasy, but I can see where some would call it science fiction as an alternate world. Still with magic etc. As I said, I'd call it fantasy.


message 13: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) Janny Wurts series, Wars of Light and Shadow, starting with The Curse of the Mistwraith is an excellent, in depth, not-for-the-faint-of-heart read. Since you mentioned Gene Wolfe, I assume you're up for it.


message 14: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Pugh | 7 comments Wow thanks everyone! It looks like I have my work cut out for me :) I'm starting with Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series. I'm very excited!


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 5387 comments I like the first three or four of those. If you don't like the later ones don't let it put you off fantasy all together, LOL.


message 16: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Hallowell | 84 comments I went to the Listopia section and searched for "Best Epic Fantasy" and got quite a few results that look good:

http://www.goodreads.com/search?utf8=...


Brenda ╰☆╮    (brnda) | 1409 comments I see you have a lot, but I have to add...( she always seems forgotten)
Jennifer Roberson's Cheysuli Chronicles, starts with Shapechangers.
Or her novels of Tiger and Del, starting with Sword-Dancer.


message 18: by Jacey (new)

Jacey (jaceybedford) | 12 comments Brenda wrote: "I always point fantasy readers to CURSE OF CHALION, by Lois Bujold. You will of course have looked at the Harry Potter books? There are some dynamite fantasy series in YA. The Bartimaeus books by..."

I heartily second 'Curse of Chalion' and if you are also into science fiction check out Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan books.


message 19: by Louise (new)

Louise | 6 comments The latest one I read is Elizabeth Hunter's Elemental mysteries - not world class but very good nonetheless. I happily worked through the four she had out. If you want to try some new writers, look out Patrick LeClerc on Writerlot.net.... his new one Every Clime and Place is serialised there for free, as is the Tales of the Shonri by Steve Godden (the novella City of Lights is free on Aamazon til 24 Nov) but more in the series are on Writerlot. There's also Ren Warom's Umwelt. Ren's first novel is being shopped by an agent as we speak. Umwelt is very dark and wild, but fab if it's your kind of thing - and again it's serialised for free on Writerlot.net.
My fave fantasy writers of all time have to be Ursula Le Guin, Jim Butycher and patricia Briggs though. Oh I know a great series you might like. Try Rebel Angels by Gillian Philip - cracking fantasy.


message 20: by Shangre (new)

Shangre | 88 comments The Hollow Kingdom was a good series


message 21: by Helen (new)

Helen This sort of thread always find me wanting to reread series mentioned. Will have to check out Abercrombie- which is the name of a pub near me!


message 22: by Ed (new)

Ed | 30 comments Great recommendations. It seems Sanderson's name keeps coming up in terms of magic.


message 23: by ~Thena~ (new)

~Thena~ (athena-nadine) | 48 comments Jacey wrote: "Brenda wrote: "I always point fantasy readers to CURSE OF CHALION, by Lois Bujold. You will of course have looked at the Harry Potter books? There are some dynamite fantasy series in YA. The Bart..."

I also loved Bujold's Sharing Knife books. I just love everything she's written.


message 24: by ~Thena~ (new)

~Thena~ (athena-nadine) | 48 comments Michael wrote: "Ed wrote: "Great recommendations. It seems Sanderson's name keeps coming up in terms of magic."

BEST Magic system writer that is writing today (at least that I have read!!)"


Agreed.


message 25: by James (new)

James Gonzalez | 131 comments Michael wrote: "Ed wrote: "Great recommendations. It seems Sanderson's name keeps coming up in terms of magic."

BEST Magic system writer that is writing today (at least that I have read!!)"


I agree also. I've only read the Mistborn and Lightbringer, but I love how each series has unique magic systems with clearly defined sets of rules (no all-powerful wizards who can do anything). I've heard The Way of Kings is similar but haven't had the chance to read that yet.


message 26: by Ed (new)

Ed | 30 comments I picked up the first mistborn book from the library yesterday and starting now. :). Game of thrones can wait.


message 27: by Ed (new)

Ed | 30 comments Liking mist born so far!


message 28: by Moira (new)

Moira Katson (moirakatson) | 30 comments I'd second (third? Eighth?) Patrick Rothfuss' work, and throw in the Pern series (I'd start with Dragonflight if you do) - they're engaging books!

If you're in the mood for something crossover-y and lighter, but aren't quite an urban fantasy fan, I'd suggest Dianna Wynne Jones' Deep Secret, and Diane Duane's Young Wizards series. I know that I need to mix up my high fantasy with something that makes me laugh!


message 29: by Benji (new)

Benji Dyke (gnc_centric) | 45 comments The Nightrunner series by Lynn Flewelling is mostly unknown of I've found but is one of my favorite series. It's high fantasy adventure and I absolutely adore the couple of main characters, Seregil, mysterious and wise, and Alec, young but resourceful but also so innocent and sweet! Once you read this series you'll be stuck with it for life. It is quite witty but also very heart wrenching at times ( I cried). Check it out!


message 30: by Todd (new)

Todd | 12 comments Wow.... great suggestions, I would only throw in Peter V. Brett and Brent Weeks.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 5387 comments Haven't read Lynn Flewelling, looks interesting, but I'll to buy them...


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

I would suggest Spearwielder's Tale (Spearwielder's Tale,
it's a 3-book series dealing with leperchauns,elfs,dwarfs.There are other mystical creatures that are met on the journey.


message 33: by James (new)

James Gonzalez | 131 comments Michael wrote: "Ed wrote: "I picked up the first mistborn book from the library yesterday and starting now. :). Game of thrones can wait."

If I had to choose between Mistborn: The Final Empire and A Game of Thron..."


Mistborn is amazing! I love that series. I am dying for them to make a movie trilogy about it.


message 34: by Heather (new)

Heather (creaturefromthesea) | 36 comments I'm not sure if you like to play D&D or if you are into books that play out sort of like a D&D game, but The Legend of Drizzt series (starting with Homeland) and the Dragonlance series starting with Dragons of Autumn Twilight should keep you busy for a while, since they recently updated the timeline with the Lost Chronicles Series, the first two of which take place between the first and second of the original Chronicles series, and the third takes place between Dragons of Spring Dawning and the Legends trilogy. You can skip the Legends series and move on to Dragons of Summer Flame and the War of Souls Trilogy, but I don't recommend it; I was lost by that point and plan on re-reading it because it confused me so badly.


message 35: by Annarose (last edited May 26, 2013 06:58PM) (new)

Annarose Mitchell (asmitchell) | 150 comments When I really started ready a few years ago, I stumbled upon Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn series Mistborn Trilogy Boxed Set and absolutely loved it. I read pretty much anything I could find by Brandon too.

I've also started the Shannara books by Terry Brooks, and those too are really good!The Sword of the Shannara and The Elfstones of Shannara


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Heather wrote: "I'm not sure if you like to play D&D or if you are into books that play out sort of like a D&D game, but The Legend of Drizzt series (starting with Homeland)

THANK YOU!I was hoping someone would bring up the Drizzt series.



message 37: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Berntson The Belgariad and Mallorean by Eddings are wholesome, but pretty vivid and great characters. The Malazan by Erikson is dark and gritty, much more mature and ambitious, but pretty intimidating as far as volume and theme. It takes a commitment, but is well worth it. Fritz Leiber has a good one called Lankhmar. The first one is Swords and Deviltry. Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn is also another. Have fun getting lost. :)


message 38: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 6 comments Hey You wrote: "The Nightrunner series by Lynn Flewelling is mostly unknown of I've found but is one of my favorite series. It's high fantasy adventure and I absolutely adore the couple of main characters, Seregil..."

I'll have to check that out! I loved her trilogy that started with
The Bone Doll's Twin. I can't even count how many times I've read it.

Sanderson is absolutely excellent! I cannot recommend him enough. The Lies of Locke Lamora is also very, very good (as long as you don't mind waiting AGES between books ... though I saw that you liked SOIAF, so you know the feeling, haha).

Sharon Shinn's Mystic and Rider (first book in a series of five) is another of my favorites.

I actually wasn't impressed by the Sword of Truth series. The first book was good, but it went downhill from there (and I slugged it out through the entire series).


Snarktastic Sonja (snownsew) | 258 comments Brandon wrote: "The Belgariad and Mallorean by Eddings are wholesome, but pretty vivid and great characters.

Can I just interrupt this discussion to say . . . I *love* this description? I get frustrated because books without sex are YA - but I love this "wholesome" . . . My favorite type of book.

;)


message 40: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Berntson Snarktastic Sonja wrote: "Brandon wrote: "The Belgariad and Mallorean by Eddings are wholesome, but pretty vivid and great characters.

Can I just interrupt this discussion to say . . . I *love* this description? I get frus..."


Well, thank you Sonja. Want to be friends?


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