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Past Discussions of Group Reads > The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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message 1: by Tami (new)

Tami | 3103 comments Mod
We are going to have one thread for each book as now Goodreads has made a spoiler tag that you can use to put before anything that is a spoiler. Use your discretion as to what would be a pretty big spoiler and label it. Please put up to what page the spoiler is for.

To create the tag simply do this:

< spoiler> Blah blah blah spoilery stuff < /spoiler>


*Take out the spaces in both of the spoiler tag.

It will look like this:


(view spoiler)

Discuss away...


message 2: by Christie (new)

Christie | 133 comments Okay, so I missed out on the discussion and rules for this month's group read--so forgive me if I'm stating the obvious--but both of this month's reads have new film adaptations about to be released. Big ones.
Anyways. Have a lot of people already read The Great Gatsby? This book is one of those canonical works that get assigned a lot in high school English classes and it seems to make a lot of people's favorite books lists.


message 3: by Jen (new)

Jen (wishesandwanderlust) | 696 comments I read The Great Gatsby for the first time last summer. It was never assigned reading for any of my high school or college English courses. I liked the book though! Different than what I was expecting.

I'm excited for the (new) movie, I think it comes out in December?


message 4: by Christie (new)

Christie | 133 comments I had to read it in school (twice) and it was also different from what I expected. It was so long ago that I can't really say what I expected, just something different. (Do you remember what you were expecting, Jen?)

I know I'm in the minority here, but the first time I read it I didn't like it very much. The second time I read it, I appreciated it much more. It's funny how much the way a book is perceived depends on the reader. The Christie who read The Great Gatsby for the first time was a very different reader from the Christie who read The Great Gatsby for a second time.


message 5: by Nate (new)

Nate (Dan-Tete) Jen wrote: "I read The Great Gatsby for the first time last summer. It was never assigned reading for any of my high school or college English courses. I liked the book though! Different than what I was exp..."

Apparently it's now being released in 2013.
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news...


message 6: by Riley (new)

Riley Dawson Christie wrote: "I had to read it in school (twice) and it was also different from what I expected. It was so long ago that I can't really say what I expected, just something different. (Do you remember what you we..."

I didn't like it much when I read it, either. It took me a few weeks of digesting to appreciate it. I was in high school at the time, though, and I think if I read it again I'd like it more immediately.


message 7: by Kayla (last edited Sep 12, 2012 06:24PM) (new)

Kayla | 604 comments I also had to read this book for school twice. Funnily enough though, I don't remember too much about it. I know I really enjoyed it both times and that I loved the imagery in the book. I got really caught up in the setting and I think that's why I like it so much. The characters don't seem to stick with me for some reason.

I definitely want to read it again this month (it's also a Sept. groupread in my 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die group). I have two other books I want to finish first, but hopefully I'll get to it in a week or so.


message 8: by Jessika (new)

Jessika (jessikareads) Christie wrote: "I had to read it in school (twice) and it was also different from what I expected. It was so long ago that I can't really say what I expected, just something different. (Do you remember what you we..."

Christie, it's funny that you write that. The first TWO times I read it, I didn't like it. I was in high school for that. Then when I read it in college, I totally loved it. It must be one of those books that you just have to read at the right point in time.


message 9: by Chris (new)

Chris | 93 comments I tend to like classics but this one is an exception for me. This is one of only two or three classics I've ever read that I didn't care for. I don't actively hate TGG but I never enjoyed it. To me, it just seemed like the characters represented such an excess of everything with no real morality or character. This is the only Fitzgerald I've ever read so I'd like to read some of his other stuff to compare. Has anyone read The Beautiful and the Damned or any of his other work? After The Paris Wife, the author and Zelda seem like pretty intriguing figures themselves.
Maybe I just need to revisit this one. It has been a good five years since I read it.


message 10: by Lori, The Over-Caffeinated Coffee Girl (new)

Lori | 2109 comments Mod
Chris, Most of Fitzgerald's books tend to be about the excesses of the 1920s. He offers so many critiques throughout this novel and his others.


message 11: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (vorvesm) | 132 comments Christie wrote: "...Have a lot of people already read The Great Gatsby? This book is one of those canonical works that get assigned a lot in high school English classes and it seems to make a lot of people's favorite books lists."

I read it in High School (I think 11th grade?), but I really didn't remember it!! I just re-read (well I listened to the audiobook this time) and as it was going I remembered up to about halfway through the book. This makes me think I just read the Sparknotes for the second half of the book when I read it the first time (which I was known to do for the sake of time). I liked it a lot this time and I'm really glad I re-read it.


message 12: by Liz (new)

Liz  Dalton (LizDalton) | 7 comments (view spoiler)


message 13: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (vorvesm) | 132 comments Liz, (view spoiler)


message 14: by Traci-Anne (new)

Traci-Anne (TraciAnneCan) Liz and Michelle(view spoiler)


message 15: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca | 5 comments perosnally i think the best thing about this book is it's thought provoking notions. Fitzgeralds use of colors, assumption, several veiw points, and the American dream have always been the draw for me. he isn't writing a love story for the ages, he's showing faults and basic humaity in an honest form.


message 16: by Laura (new)

Laura | 5 comments I actually read this for my junior year high school english class. I loved it and thought that it was the most interesting read. My favorite character in the book is Daisy because (view spoiler)


message 17: by Christie (new)

Christie | 133 comments That's so funny that so many people (Kayla, Jess) also had to read it for school not once, but twice. And that lots of other people also didn't like it on first impression . . . or second (Riley, Jess, Chris . . .).

Liz brings up a really good point about the likability of the characters. (view spoiler)

Chris, for me the (view spoiler)

Not sure if the depth of its insight there is much consolation, but it did make me appreciate the book more.

On another note, the new movie is now set to be released May 10, 2013. Has anyone seen the old one?


message 18: by Christie (new)

Christie | 133 comments Okay, I want to add two more things. :D

1) I don't think (view spoiler) There are SO many different ideas to pick up and chew on, and that's a big part of why it has endured as a popular work of fiction and a famous part of the "literary canon" for so long.

2) It's really exciting to see how many people have gotten involved in the book discussions this month. (Myself included.) I think I had this impression that people would be reluctant to engage in a discussion of the "classics" (i.e. books more than a few years old), but looking back at the past few months, they're actually proving to be the ones most commented-upon. This is fun; I hope we can do this again!


message 19: by Wei (new)

Wei Cho (lunexian) | 13 comments I have mixed feelings about this book

1. F. Scott Fitzgerald qualifies into the list of authors you should read before you die. A general consensus that everybody knows due to the fact that most of his work end up labeled as classic. Hence why I decided to pick up his book, The Great Gatsby, and read it.

2. He describes things and situations with excess, and the description sometimes feels never-ending and occasionally boring :S.

3. His characters are quirky, which is a great thing because they have so much depth in them that they seem real.

4. Fitzgerald does have a way to get the words into your soul. Gosh, I can honestly say that the first half of the book I had to read it with my hands holding up my head. However, by the end it got really interesting. I could not put it down.

5. I was heart-broken. (view spoiler)


message 20: by Christie (new)

Christie | 133 comments Yup, (view spoiler).

Does anyone out there have any favorite quotations that come from this book? I know it's a popular source for them. That final line is especially renown . . .


message 21: by Wei (new)

Wei Cho (lunexian) | 13 comments He must have felt that he had lost the old warm world, paid a high price for living too long with a single dream.

For some reason this is my favorite quote. It's so beautiful, a different kind of devastating.


message 22: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca | 5 comments “I hope she'll be a fool -- that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.”

it always made me stop and think


message 23: by Liz (new)

Liz  Dalton (LizDalton) | 7 comments Traci-anne wrote: "Liz and Michelle[spoilers removed]"

(view spoiler)


message 24: by Kayla (new)

Kayla | 604 comments What's funny in this novel is how pointless pretty much all of the conversations were that the characters had. Nothing of import was ever said until near the end (view spoiler). I think Fitzgerald was really attacking the rich in this way. I can't remember for sure, but I think one of the major causes of contention between Fitzgerald and Hemingway was that Hemingway was a bit of a "partier" while Fitzgerald hated the social scene. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I'm not great at remembering trivia, though I love reading facts about authors.

Liz, I definitely agree with you about the characters. The only likeable one was Nick, and I thought Jordan was alright too.

I think it's interesting that Gatsby wrote her as a professional golfer. I wouldn't have thought female athletes would have been thought of too highly in the 1920s. I wonder why Gatsby chose to writer her as one?

And in answer to your last question, I really felt sorry for Gatsby for pretty much the whole book. (view spoiler)


message 25: by Ana (new)

Ana | 65 comments I think the best parts of this book were the characters. They were all deeply flawed and at most times not even likeable, but they were interesting, and that's what made them come alive to me. I'm also a fan of description, so Fitzgerald's way of really laying out the scene was very appealing to me.


message 26: by Rachael (new)

Rachael Scott I agree with you Ana, although I don't particularly like any of the characters throughout the entire novel. However, I think this was brilliantly done by Fitzgerald to highlight his cynicism regarding the American dream


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