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Read-Along Fall 2012

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message 1: by Spark (new)

Spark | 11 comments Mod
Our first Book Club read is The Sisters Brothers, a western by Vancouver Island-born Patrick deWitt. It was nominated for the 2011 Booker and has received good reviews all around. The Globe & Mail described it as "bold, original and powerfully compelling work, grounded in well-drawn characters and a firm hold on narrative." It also has one of the best covers ever!

It is available for download from Manitoba eLibrary and in print from various public libraries, including WInnipeg and the Western Manitoba Regional Library.


message 2: by Spark (new)

Spark | 11 comments Mod
I would say that westerns are not my thing, though I'm not sure I've ever read one before. But this book.... totally my thing. Holy smokes! Started it yesterday and could not put it down! Just got sucked right into the brutal, sad and beautiful world of Eli and Charlie Sisters.


message 3: by Fatima (new)

Fatima | 3 comments Mod
I heard of western writers like Zane Grey. I have not really read the genre, but after reading this novel I will tackle Elmore Leonard's westerns. (He wrote 3:10 to Yuma.)


message 4: by Diana (new)

Diana | 5 comments I really enjoyed this book. I really liked Eli and his journey. I have not read typical westerns before but I am not sure I would call this a western when describing it. It reminded me of 'The Outlander' by Gil Adamson.


message 5: by Fatima (new)

Fatima | 3 comments Mod
I basicially found myself in the wild west on Sunday. I made it to disc 4 in Deadwood Season 2, then made progress on the book.

It made me wonder if the western is not as dead as people beleived just evolving.


message 6: by Diana (last edited Sep 24, 2012 04:11PM) (new)

Diana | 5 comments Fatima wrote: "I basicially found myself in the wild west on Sunday. I made it to disc 4 in Deadwood Season 2, then made progress on the book.

It made me wonder if the western is not as dead as people beleived ..."


Deadwood! Now that is some brutal western subject matter. I think you are right though. The western is still popular and evolving. My latest visual western experience is Gunless with Paul Gross.


message 7: by Fatima (new)

Fatima | 3 comments Mod
Has anyone noticed the novel slowing.right.down.? It happened around the time the brothers arrive in San Francisco and discovered Morris has wandered off.


message 8: by Spark (new)

Spark | 11 comments Mod
Fatima wrote: "Has anyone noticed the novel slowing.right.down.? It happened around the time the brothers arrive in San Francisco and discovered Morris has wandered off."

There is a shift in the story around that point, for sure.... but I wouldn't call it slowing down. I think it was a bit of a slow book overall, meaning even though there is tons of stuff going on and a lot of action, the style of writing doesn't give it a frenetic pace. It very much matches Eli's personality.


message 9: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth | 1 comments Mod
I'm curious - what did you make of the intermissions with the creepy little girl?


message 10: by Spark (new)

Spark | 11 comments Mod
Elizabeth wrote: "I'm curious - what did you make of the intermissions with the creepy little girl?"

I'm not sure. DeWitt says: DeWitt: I can’t remember the original motivation. I think I was trying to amuse myself, which is always dangerous. But those two sections deal with a supernatural element in the shape of a not very nice little girl who may or may not be a seer. I actually suggested to my editor at Ecco that we cut the intermission titles. But she pointed out, correctly, that without the titles those parts were jarring in that they seemed to come out of left field. They’re more effective when the reader knows they aren’t a part of the immediate story.

Which doesn't actually explain much. I didn't feel it added much, either. To paraphrase from one of my favourite books... It is words for the sake of words. It has no meaning. It's literary wanking, Brother (or in this case Sister).


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