Boundless



Average rating: 3.73 · 938 ratings · 6 reviews · 27 distinct works
Anatomy & Physiology

3.94 avg rating — 125 ratings — published 2013 — 7 editions
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U.S. History, Volume II: 18...

3.79 avg rating — 96 ratings — published 2013
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Art History, Volume I: Preh...

3.78 avg rating — 64 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Chemistry

3.68 avg rating — 66 ratings — published 2013
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Algebra

3.88 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 2013
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Art History, Volume II: 140...

3.60 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Writing

3.74 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 2013
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Statistics

3.80 avg rating — 49 ratings — published 2013
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Physics

3.88 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 2013 — 12 editions
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Calculus

3.68 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 2013
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“In Alabama, for instance, in 1900 fourteen Black Belt counties had
79,311 voters on the rolls; by June 1, 1903, after the new
constitution was passed, registration had dropped to just 1,081.
Statewide Alabama in 1900 had
181,315 blacks eligible to vote. By 1903
only 2,980 were registered, although
at least 74,000 were literate. From
1900 to 1903, white registered voters
fell by more than 40,000, although
their population grew in overall
number. By 1941, more poor whites
than blacks had been disfranchised in
Alabama, mostly due to effects of the
cumulative poll tax. Estimates were
that 600,000 whites and 500,000
blacks had been disfranchised.”
Boundless, U.S. History, Volume II: 1865-Present

“The primary tool of monetary policy is open market operations.”
Boundless, Business

“White supremacist paramilitary organizations allied with the
Democratic Party practiced intimidation, violence and
assassinations to repress and prevent blacks exercising their civil
and voting rights in elections from 1868 through the mid-1870s.
Black voting decreased markedly under such pressure, and white
Democrats regained political control of southern legislatures and
governors' offices in the 1870s. As a result of a national compromise
related to the presidency, the federal government withdrew its
forces from the South in 1877.”
Boundless, U.S. History, Volume II: 1865-Present



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