Daniel Mendelsohn


Born
in New York, New York, The United States
April 16, 1960

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Average rating: 4.15 · 9,143 ratings · 1,407 reviews · 27 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Lost: A Search for Six ...

4.07 avg rating — 4,864 ratings — published 2006 — 45 editions
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An Odyssey: A Father, a Son...

4.26 avg rating — 2,418 ratings — published 2017 — 26 editions
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The Elusive Embrace: Desire...

3.95 avg rating — 244 ratings — published 1999 — 7 editions
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Waiting for the Barbarians:...

3.90 avg rating — 248 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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How Beautiful It Is and How...

4.19 avg rating — 189 ratings — published 2008 — 11 editions
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قضايا أدبية: نهاية الرواية ...

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3.74 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2011
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Una Odisea: Un padre, un hi...

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Gender and the City in Euri...

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Hearing Sappho

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Eine Odyssee: Mein Vater, e...

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“Closeness can lead to emotions other than love. It's the ones who have been too intimate with you, lived in too close quarters, seen too much of your pain or envy or, perhaps more than anything, your shame, who, at the crucial moment, can be too easy to cut out, to exile, to expel, to kill off.”
Daniel Mendelsohn, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million

“As ingenious as this explanation is, it seems to me to miss entirely the emotional significance of the text- its beautiful and beautifully economical evocation of certain difficult feelings that most ordinary people, at least, are all too familiar with: searing regret for the past we must abandon, tragic longing for what must be left behind. (...) Still, perhaps that's the pagan, the Hellenist in me talking. (Rabbi Friedman, by contrast, cannot bring himself even to contemplate that what the people of Sodom intend to do to the two male angels, as they crowd around Lot's house at the beginning of the narrative, is to rape them, and interpretation blandly accepted by Rashi, who blithely points out thta if the Sodomites hadn't wanted sexual pleasure from the angels, Lot wouldn't have suggested, as he rather startingly does, that the Sodomites take his two daughter as subsitutes. But then, Rashi was French.)

It is this temperamental failure to understand Sodom in its own context, as an ancient metropolis of the Near East, as a site of sophisticated, even decadent delights and hyper-civilized beauties, that results in the commentator's inability to see the true meaning of the two crucial elements of this story: the angel's command to Lot's family not to turn and look back at the city they are fleeing, and the transformation of Lot's wife into a pillar of salt. For if you see Sodom as beautiful -which it will seem to be all the more so, no doubt, for having to be abandoned and lost forever, precisely the way in which, say, relatives who are dead are always somehow more beautiful and good than those who still live- then it seems clear that Lot and his family are commanded not to look back at it not as a punishment, but for a practical reason: because regret for what we have lost, for the pasts we have to abandon, often poisons any attempts to make a new life, which is what Lot and his family now must do, as Noah and his family once had to do, as indeed all those who survive awful annihilations must somehow do. This explanation, in turn, helps explain the form that the punishment of Lot's wife took- if indeed it was a punishment to begin with, which I personally do not believe it was, since to me it seems far more like a natural process, the inevitable outcome of her character. For those who are compelled by their natures always to be looking back at what has been, rather than forward into the future, the great danger is tears, the unstoppable weeping that the Greeks, if not the author of Genesis, knew was not only a pain but a narcotic pleasure, too: a mournful contemplation so flawless, so crystalline, that it can, in the end, immobilize you.”
Daniel Mendelsohn, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million

“I did and do believe, after all that I've seen and done, that if you project yourself into the mass of things, if you look for things, if you search, you will, by the very act of searching, make something that would not otherwise have happened, you will find something, even something small, something that will certainly be more than if you hadn't gone looking in the first place, if you hadn't asked our grandfather anything at all...There are no miracles, no magical coincidences. There is only looking and finally seeing, what was always there.”
Daniel Mendelsohn, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million

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