Steve Coll



Steve Coll is President & CEO of New America Foundation, and a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine. Previously he spent 20 years as a foreign correspondent and senior editor at The Washington Post, serving as the paper's managing editor from 1998 to 2004.

He is author six books, including The Deal of the Century: The Break Up of AT&T (1986); The Taking of Getty Oil (1987); Eagle on the Street, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the SEC's battle with Wall Street (with David A. Vise, 1991); On the Grand Trunk Road: A Journey into South Asia (1994), Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 (2004); and The Bin Ladens: An Arabian Family in th
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The Media and the Mueller Report���s March Surprise

The Attorney General���s summary reported no conspiracy, but serious newsrooms and journalists did the job they are supposed to do, Steve Coll writes.��
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Published on March 31, 2019 02:00
Average rating: 4.2 · 17,830 ratings · 1,567 reviews · 10 distinct worksSimilar authors
Ghost Wars: The Secret Hist...

4.30 avg rating — 11,497 ratings — published 2004 — 19 editions
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Private Empire: ExxonMobil ...

3.96 avg rating — 2,953 ratings — published 2012 — 12 editions
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Directorate S: The C.I.A. a...

4.25 avg rating — 1,453 ratings — published 2018 — 12 editions
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The Bin Ladens: An Arabian ...

3.94 avg rating — 1,435 ratings — published 2008 — 22 editions
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On the Grand Trunk Road

3.69 avg rating — 185 ratings — published 1993 — 7 editions
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The Deal of the Century: Th...

4.21 avg rating — 126 ratings — published 1986 — 5 editions
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The Taking of Getty Oil: Th...

4.17 avg rating — 163 ratings — published 1987 — 8 editions
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Collaboration in Science an...

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2001
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Eagle on the Street: The SE...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating3 editions
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Afghanistan: A Distant War

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4.07 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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“Even President Reagan couldn’t understand him. During an early briefing Casey delivered to the national security cabinet, Reagan slipped Vice President Bush a note: “Did you understand a word he said?” Reagan later told William F. Buckley, “My problem with Bill was that I didn’t understand him at meetings. Now, you can ask a person to repeat himself once. You can ask him twice. But you can’t ask him a third time. You start to sound rude. So I’d just nod my head, but I didn’t know what he was actually saying.”
Such was the dialogue for six years between the president and his intelligence chief in a nuclear-armed nation running secret wars on four continents.”
Steve Coll, Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and bin Laden from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001

“In the Oval Office, President Bush told Khalilzad, “Musharraf denies all of what you are saying.” “Didn’t they deny, Mr. President, for years that they had a nuclear program?” 8 Bush said he would call Musharraf and arrange for the ambassador to meet with him, to discuss the accusations directly. Khalilzad flew to Islamabad. Beforehand, he sent Musharraf a gift, a crate of Afghan pomegranates. When they sat down, Musharraf thanked him, but added that he hated pomegranates—too many seeds. They talked extensively about Musharraf’s usual complaints about the Afghan government—too many Panjshiris in key security positions, too many Indian spies under diplomatic cover in Kabul and elsewhere. Khalilzad proposed a joint intelligence investigation between the United States and Pakistan to document any covert Indian activity in Afghanistan. “There are no Taliban here,” Musharraf said blankly. 9”
Steve Coll, Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America's Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan

“One view at the highest levels of the U.S. embassy in Kabul by summer’s end was that Karzai “was a very clever madman—just because he was insane doesn’t mean he was stupid.”
Steve Coll, Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America's Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan

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