Harold Speed


Genre
Art


Average rating: 4.07 · 4,762 ratings · 45 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Practice and Science of...

4.06 avg rating — 4,331 ratings — published 1900 — 137 editions
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Oil Painting Techniques and...

4.23 avg rating — 427 ratings — published 1987 — 3 editions
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What is the Good of Art?

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings
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The Practice & Science of D...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating5 editions
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The Practice and Science of...

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“For colour is one of the most rapturous truths that can be revealed to man.”
Harold Speed, Oil Painting Techniques and Materials

“The search for this inner truth is the search for beauty. People whose vision does not penetrate beyond the narrow limits of the commonplace, and to whom a cabbage is but a vulgar vegetable, are surprised if they see a beautiful picture painted of one, and say that the artist has idealised it, meaning that he has consciously altered its appearance on some idealistic formula; whereas he has probably only honestly given expression to a truer, deeper vision than they had been aware of. The commonplace is not the true, but only the shallow, view of things.
[...]
Our moments of peace are, I think, always associated with some form of beauty, of this spark of harmony within corresponding with some infinite source without. [...]. In moments of beauty (for beauty is, strictly speaking, a state of mind rather than an attribute of certain objects [...]) we seem to get a glimpse of this deeper truth behind the things of sense. And who can say but that this sense, dull enough in most of us, is not an echo of a greater harmony existing somewhere the other side of things, that we dimly feel through them, evasive though it is”
Harold Speed, The Practice and Science of Drawing

“It is this perfect accuracy, this lack of play, of variety, that makes the machine-made article so lifeless. Wherever there is life there is variety, and the substitution of the machine-made for the hand-made article has impoverished the world to a greater extent than we are probably yet aware of. Whereas formerly, before the advent of machinery, the commonest article you could pick up had a life and warmth which gave it individual interest, now everything is turned out to such a perfection of deadness that one is driven to pick up and collect, in sheer desperation, the commonest rubbish still surviving from the earlier period.”
Harold Speed, The Practice and Science of Drawing



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