Forrest Church


Born
in Palo Alto, CA, The United States
September 23, 1948

Died
September 24, 2009

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Rev. Forrest Church served for almost three decades as senior minister and was minister of public theology at All Souls Unitarian Church in New York City. He wrote or edited twenty-five books, including Love & Death.

Average rating: 3.95 · 1,626 ratings · 233 reviews · 27 distinct worksSimilar authors
Love & Death: My Journey th...

4.22 avg rating — 203 ratings — published 2008 — 9 editions
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So Help Me God: The Foundin...

3.94 avg rating — 80 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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The Cathedral of the World:...

3.89 avg rating — 87 ratings — published 2009 — 6 editions
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Lifecraft: The Art of Meani...

4.09 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 2000 — 6 editions
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Life Lines: Holding On

4.17 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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The Separation of Church an...

4.13 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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God And Other Famous Libera...

4.17 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1991 — 2 editions
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The American Creed: A Spiri...

3.80 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2002 — 6 editions
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Freedom from Fear: Finding ...

3.95 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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Bringing God Home: A Spirit...

3.52 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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More books by Forrest Church…
“Where's your church?"
"We're standing in it."
"But this is a bookstore and it's a Friday."
"Yes, but you might also choose to see it as a cathedral of the human spirit-a storehouse consecrated to the full spectrum of human experience. Just about every idea we've ever had is in here somewhere. A place containing great thinking is a sacred space.”
Forrest Church, A Chosen Faith: An Introduction to Unitarian Universalism

“God language can tie people into knots, of course. In part, that is because ‘God’ is not God's name. Referring to the highest power we can imagine, ‘God’ is our name for that which is greater than all and yet present in each. For some the highest imaginable power will be a petty and angry tribal baron ensconced high above the clouds on a golden throne, visiting punishment on all who don't believe in him. But for others, the highest power is love, goodness, justice, or the spirit of life itself. Each of us projects our limited experience on a cosmic screen in letters as big as our minds can fashion. For those whose vision is constricted (illiberal, narrow-minded people), this can have horrific consequences. But others respond to the munificence of creation with broad imagination and sympathy. Answering to the highest and best within and beyond themselves, they draw lessons and fathom meaning so redemptive that surely it touches the divine.”
Forrest Church, The Cathedral of the World: A Universalist Theology

“Whenever we give our hearts in love, the burden of our vulnerability grows. We risk being rebuffed or embarrassed or inadequate. Beyond these things, we risk the enormous pain of loss. When those we love die, a part of us dies with them. When those we love are sick, in body or spirit, we too feel the pain. All of this is worth it. Especially the pain. If we insulate our hearts from suffering, we shall only subdue the very thing that makes life worth living. We cannot protect ourselves from loss. We can only protect ourselves from the death of love, we are left only with the aching hollow of regret, that haunting emptiness where love might have been.”
Forrest Church

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