M. Stanton Evans


Born
in Kingsville, Texas, The United States
July 20, 1934

Died
March 03, 2015


American journalist, author and educator. As an undergraduate, Evans was an editor for the Yale Daily News. Upon graduation, Evans became assistant editor of The Freeman, where Chodorov was editor. The following year, he joined the staff of William F. Buckley's fledgling National Review (where he served as associate editor from 1960 to 1973)and became managing editor of Human Events, where he is currently a contributing editor. In 1959, Evans became head editorial writer of The Indianapolis News, rising to editor the following year. In 1971, Evans became a commentator for the CBS Television and Radio Networks, and in 1980 became a commentator for National Public Radio, the Voice of America, Radio America and WGMS-FM in Washington, D.C. In 1 ...more

Average rating: 4.05 · 640 ratings · 99 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Blacklisted by History: The...

4.12 avg rating — 476 ratings — published 2007 — 13 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Stalin's Secret Agents: The...

by
3.81 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 2012 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Theme is Freedom: Relig...

3.78 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 1994 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Clear and Present Dangers: ...

4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1975
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Liberal Establishment

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1972
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Future of Conservatism

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1968
Rate this book
Clear rating
Revolt On The Campus

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1961 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Lawbreakers

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1968
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Fringe On Top

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1964
Rate this book
Clear rating
Will America Surrender

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1965
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by M. Stanton Evans…
“We have two parties here, and only two. One is the evil party, and the other is the stupid party. ... I'm very proud to be a member of the stupid party. ... Occasionally, the two parties get together to do something that's both evil and stupid. That's called bipartisanship.”
M. Stanton Evans

“Given this blizzard of Bureau paper, any half-sentient high official of the government had to know, by mid-1946, that a truly massive problem existed. Reaction to these advices, however, was strangely torpid. After an early flicker of concern, the White House seemed especially inert—indeed, quite hostile to the revelations, and in virtually no case inclined to action. At agencies where the suspects worked, responses weren’t a great deal better. In some cases, the reports were simply ignored; in others, they provoked some initial interest, but not much beyond this; in still others, people who received the memos would say they never got them. Considering the gravity of the problem, Hoover must have felt he was pushing on a string. A recurring subject in the Bureau files is the matter of reports to high officials that somehow got “lost.” That reports about such topics would be casually laid aside or “lost” suggests, at best, a thorough indifference to the scope and nature of the trouble. From Hoover’s comments it’s also apparent he suspected something worse—the passing around of the memos to people who weren’t supposed to have them.”
M. Stanton Evans, Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies

“Another U.S. official disturbed by the prospect of a Washington-Tokyo truce was the Treasury’s Harry Dexter White. “Persons in our government,” White declaimed, “are hoping to betray the cause of the heroic Chinese people.”
M. Stanton Evans, Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies