Greg Harris



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Average rating: 4.29 · 136 ratings · 25 reviews · 30 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Darkness and the Glory:...

4.26 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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The Cup and the Glory: Less...

4.42 avg rating — 45 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
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The Stone And The Glory: Le...

4.29 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Summer of '78: A Road Trip

3.78 avg rating — 9 ratings2 editions
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The Bible Expositor's Handb...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings
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The Stone and the Glory of ...

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings2 editions
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The Bible Expositor's Handb...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings2 editions
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Pangyrus Four

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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The Face and the Glory: Les...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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The Bible Expositor's Handb...

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“If you asked most Christians today what it would take for them to know Jesus better, the answers most likely would range from Bible study, time alone with God, prayer, a good church, good fellowship, seminars, or Christian magazines. Most of these have varying validity, but in Paul’s estimation, they lacked a key component. In Philippians 3:10 Paul wrote that I may “know Him.” He used the Greek word that generally means, “to know by experience,” rather than “to know intellectually.” Herein is a foundational difference between Paul and many others. Some limit their knowledge of Jesus only to information. Scribble it in a notebook, take good notes, treat the Bible as an academic textbook—walk away and leave it when you want. For Paul, the Person of Jesus stayed in the forefront. He never denied the need for deep study—he enjoyed it—but he never divorced doctrine from the Author. Living words from the living God nourished Paul throughout his Christian walk.”
Greg Harris, The Cup and the Glory

“So often we humanly view a “no” from God as a failure on our part. We tried this, but someone else was chosen. We wanted to go, but we could not gain entrance. If all the previously mentioned elements are in place, we need to realize that the “no” originates from God. God remains aware and actively involved in directing our lives. A certain liberation takes place when we appropriate this by faith. Instead of looking at “no” as a personal failure, we can view it as an aspect of the overall direct and particular plan God has for us. Instead of “no” highlighting deficiencies and limitations on our part, we can view it as the active work of our heavenly Father who masterminds the paths and timetable we are to travel, as well as the means necessary to bring us there. Such recognition is not an escapist mentality—rather it is the appraising of your circumstances through the grid of biblical truth. However, as before, the previous elements of obedience and faith must be operative. If you are truly walking with the Lord, a “no” really is from God. Luke emphasized this in the text by noting the active involvement of the Holy Spirit (16:6), Spirit of Jesus (16:7), and God the Father (16:10). It is no coincidence Luke presented all the members of the Trinity in a passage where humanly it appears that none were working. Walking by faith comes down to the proper spiritual perspective—and you must have it when you are on the road to Troas with the Lord.”
Greg Harris, The Cup and the Glory



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