Goodreads helps you follow your favorite authors. Be the first to learn about new releases!
Start by following David Livingstone.

David Livingstone David Livingstone > Quotes


David Livingstone quotes (showing 1-30 of 157)

“God, send me anywhere, only go with me. Lay any burden on me, only sustain me. And sever any tie in my heart except the tie that binds my heart to Yours.”
David Livingstone
“If you have men who will only come if they know there is a good road, I don't want them. I want men who will come if there is no road at all.”
David Livingstone
tags: road
“I will go anywhere, provided it be forward.”
David Livingstone
“All that I am I owe to Jesus Christ, revealed to me in His divine Book.”
David Livingstone
“There is one safe and happy place, and that is in the will of God.”
David Livingstone
“If a commission by an earthly king is considered an honor, how can a commission by a Heavenly King be considered a sacrifice?”
David Livingstone
“I will place no value on anything I have or may possess except in relation to the kingdom of Christ. ”
David Livingstone
“Nothing earthly will make me give up my work in despair.”
David Livingstone
“Sympathy is no substitute for action.”
David Livingstone
“The best remedy for a sick church is to put it on a missionary diet.”
David Livingstone
“Christ alone can save the world, but Christ cannot save the world alone.”
David Livingstone
“God had an only Son and He made Him a missionary.”
David Livingstone
“I place no value on anything I have or may possess, except in relation to the kingdom of God. If anything will advance the interests of the kingdom, it shall be given away or kept, only as by giving or keeping it I shall most promote the glory of Him to whom I owe all my hopes in time or eternity.”
David Livingstone
“I have found that I have no unusual endowments of intellect, but this day I resolve that I will be an uncommon Christian.”
David Livingstone
“This generation can only reach this generation.”
David Livingstone
“For my own part, I have never ceased to rejoice that God has appointed me to such an office. People talk of the sacrifice I have made in spending so much of my life in Africa. Is that a sacrifice which brings its own blest reward in healthful activity, the consciousness of doing good, peace of mind, and a bright hope of a glorious destiny hereafter? Away with the word sacrifice. Say rather it is a privilege. Anxiety, sickness, suffering, or danger, now and then, with a foregoing of the common conveniences and charities of this life, may make us pause, and cause the spirit to waver, and the soul to sink; but let this only be for a moment. All these are nothing when compared with the glory which shall be revealed in and for us. I never made a sacrifice.”
David Livingstone
“If we have not enough in our religion to share it with all the world, it is doomed here at home.”
David Livingstone
“It is not all pleasure this exploration.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“I will go anywhere, provided it is forward.”
David Livingstone
“I have avoided giving offence to intelligent Arabs, who have pressed me, asking if I believed in Mohamad by saying, "No I do not: I am a child of Jesus bin Miriam," avoiding anything offensive in my tone, and often adding that Mohamad found their forefathers bowing down to trees and stones, and did good to them by forbidding idolatry, and teaching the worship of the only One God. This, they all know, and it pleases them to have it recognised.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“With others arguments are useless, and the only answer I care to give is the remark of an English sailor, who, on seeing slave-traders actually at their occupation, said to his companion, "Shiver my timbers, mate, if the devil don't catch these fellows, we might as well have no devil at all.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“The tusks from India, Ceylon, &c, are smaller in size, partly of an opaque character, and partly translucent (or, as it is technically called "bright"), and harder and more cracked, but those from Siam and the neighbouring countries are very "bright," soft, and fine grained; they are much sought after for carvings and ornamental work. Tusks”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“Few achievements in our day have made a greater impression than that of the adventurous missionary who unaided crossed the Continent of Equatorial Africa. His unassuming simplicity, his varied intelligence, his indomitable pluck, his steady religious purpose, form a combination of qualities rarely found in one man. By common consent, Dr. Livingstone has come to be regarded as one of the most remarkable travellers of his own or of any other age.'—British Quarterly Review.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“Three times in one day was I delivered from impending death. My attendants, who were scattered in all directions, came running back to me, calling out, "Peace! peace! you will finish all your work in spite of these people, and in spite of everything." Like them, I took it as an omen of good success to crown me yet, thanks to the "Almighty Preserver of men." We had five hours of running the gauntlet, waylaid by spearmen, who all felt that if they killed me they would be revenging the death of relations. From”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“In addition to the above a few tons of Mammoth ivory are received from time to time from the Arctic regions and Siberia, and although of unknown antiquity, some tusks are equal in every respect to ivory which is obtained in the present day from elephants newly killed; this, no doubt, is owing to the preservative effects of the ice in which the animals have been imbedded for many thousands of years. In the year 1799 the entire carcase of a mammoth was taken from the ice, and the skeleton and portions of the skin, still covered with reddish hair, are preserved in the Museum of St. Petersburg: it is said that portions of the flesh were eaten by the men who dug it out of the ice.]”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“The only feasible reason I can discover is a depraved appetite, giving an extraordinary craving for meat which we call "high." They are said to bury a dead body for a couple of days in the soil in a forest, and in that time, owing to the climate, it soon becomes putrid enough for the strongest stomachs.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“so now that place is shut up from traders, and all this country will be closed as soon as the Manyuema learn that guns are limited in their power of killing, and especially in the hands of slaves, who cannot shoot, but only make a noise. These Suaheli are the most cruel and bloodthirsty missionaries in existence, and withal so impure in talk and acts, spreading disease everywhere. The Lord sees it.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“ball of hair rolled in the stomach of a lion, as calculi are, is a great charm among the Arabs: it scares away other animals, they say. Lion's fat smeared on the tails of oxen taken through a country abounding in tsetse, or bungo, is a sure preventive; when I heard of this, I thought that lion's fat would be as difficult of collection as gnat's brains or mosquito tongues, but I was assured that many lions are killed on the Basango highland, and they, in common with all beasts there, are extremely fat: so it is not at all difficult to buy a calabash of the preventive, and Banyamwezi, desirous of taking cattle to the coast for sale, know the substance, and use it successfully (?).”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“Mr. Stanley used some very strong arguments in favour of my going home, recruiting my strength, getting artificial teeth, and then returning to finish my task; but my judgment said, "All your friends will wish you to make a complete work of the exploration of the sources of the Nile before you retire." My daughter Agnes says, "Much as I wish you to come home, I would rather that you finished your work to your own satisfaction than return merely to gratify me." Rightly and nobly said, my darling Nannie. Vanity whispers pretty loudly, "She is a chip of the old block." My blessing on her and all the rest.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873
“1870.—Moenembegg, the most intelligent of the two sons of Moenékuss, in power, told us that a man was killed and eaten a few miles from this yesterday: hunger was the reason assigned. On speaking of tainted meat, he said that the Manyuema put meat in water for two days to make it putrid and smell high. The love of high meat is the only reason I know for their cannibalism, but the practice is now hidden on account of the disgust that the traders expressed against open man-eating when they first arrived.”
David Livingstone, The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death: 1869-1873

« previous 1 3 4 5 6

All Quotes | Add A Quote
Play The 'Guess That Quote' Game

Missionary Travels And Researches In South Africa Missionary Travels And Researches In South Africa
37 ratings
Open Preview