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The Raven

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4.29  ·  Rating details ·  120,801 ratings  ·  2,900 reviews
In Gustave Doré, one of the most prolific and successful book illustrators of the late 19h century, Edgar Allan Poe's renowned poem The Raven found perhaps its most perfect artistic interpreter. Doré's dreamlike, otherworldly style, tinged with melancholy, seems ideally matched to the bleak despair of Poe's celebrated work, among the most popular American poems ever writte ...more
Paperback, 64 pages
Published April 25th 1996 by Dover Publications (first published January 29th 1845)
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Nicole Each stanza of the poem is given its own page, with a full-page illustration on each facing page. The poem is preceded by a 3-page introduction and fo…moreEach stanza of the poem is given its own page, with a full-page illustration on each facing page. The poem is preceded by a 3-page introduction and followed by a 19-page essay ("The Philosophy of Composition") that Poe wrote about his writing process, using "The Raven" as a specific example.(less)
Carrie Edward They are the full peice. They can be found online and in a special aptly titled 'Poe' which can be found on Amazon Video.

Hope this helps!…more
They are the full peice. They can be found online and in a special aptly titled 'Poe' which can be found on Amazon Video.

Hope this helps!(less)

Community Reviews

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Muhtasin
Nov 26, 2020 rated it really liked it
The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe
description
There is no wonder The Raven is one of the greatest and the most well-known poems. So many emotions are filled into this book. It has full capacity to give one a feeling that every word comes from Poe's soul and may evoke you of your beloved lost one. Highly recommended to listen and read the book at the same time. For this, you won't miss the exceptional illustrations in the book and the narrator's astounding performance.
Leave my loneliness unbroken!

Nevermore.
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
The Raven, Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere.

It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore.

Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress w
...more
Sean Barrs
Jun 16, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shall we descend into madness? Shall we be haunted by our own desires? Shall we be consumed by that terrible facet of life known only as death? Shall we cling to what cannot be reanimated? Shall we wish for a return of something that has long been in darkness?

Shall we become obliterated by the brutal finality of such a statement as “nevermore?”

Lenore has gone. She has departed from this life, and is permanently out of the reach of the man. The raven represents the solidarity of this. Despite h
...more
Gaurav
Jun 29, 2021 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Raven is a piercing piece by Edgar Allan Poe who I am reading for the very first time. I read it with holding the breath in an unnamable, haunting feeling due to the eerie atmosphere created by the poet through the verses. It’s a dreary, windy winter night with only a flicker of an old lamp burning like a symbol of hope, you feel the crushing effect on your heart, which is pounding heavily, of such a gothic setting, the horror gets intensified when the poundings on the rags of your old door, ...more
Annet
Aug 10, 2017 rated it really liked it
Nevermore! ...........
Read this poem, listen to this poem and study the drawings of Gustave Dore... and know this is a unique masterpiece. Hauntingly beautiful. Brooding, dark, desperate, mysterious... These starting lines are famous I think:
Once upon a midnight dreary,
while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume
of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping,
suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping,
rapping at my chamber door.
"'Tis some visiter," I m
...more
Florencia
Jul 23, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted—nevermore!


description

Themes such as loss and relentless melancholy - nothing foreign to Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) - combined with a repetitive rhythm that gives it a unique and gradually oppressive musicality resulted in one of the best literary works of all time, The Raven.

This edition, first published in 1844, includes the steel-plate engravings by renowned French artist Gustave Doré (1832–1883),
...more
Jess the Shelf-Declared Bibliophile
Beautiful, classic prose.

Reread as part of going through his complete works. This one will always be one of my favorites!
Ahmed  Ejaz
Jan 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2017, poetry
Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, 
Soon again I heard a tapping something louder than
before


WoW! What a poem it is!!

I am not into poems that much but this poem is exceptionally awesome. I couldn't stop reading this. I have read this poem at least 3 times by now. It's just that amazing. Once you started, you couldn't be able to stop until the end.
I have fallen in love with this poem of E. A. Poe. Madly!! I have even downloaded its audio version. And that's also rea
...more
Michael
Oct 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Happy Halloween, EAP! This is probably the best poem in history ever to have sold for $9. But what is it about? That's a more difficult question. The poem has undeniable power, but its power (as in much of Poe) is not entirely susceptible of rational explication.

First, there's the sheer liturgical music of the poem, as evidenced from the very opening lines:

"Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore--
While I nodded, near
...more
James
Sep 05, 2016 rated it really liked it
First... you must read the introductory stanza from Edgar Allan Poe's famous poem, The Raven. And then I'll provide a short review:

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
Only this and nothing more.”

And this is what will happen to you
...more
Navessa


Am I the only one creeped out by ravens? Every time I hear mention of them I shudder. I mean, come on. Have you ever heard one croak? Second question; have you ever heard a tree full of them croak? I have.

There I was, minding my own business, just trying to walk home from the bus stop. I didn’t even see them until I was directly beneath the tree. I heard this strange rustling sound and thought it was weird because the leaves had already fallen. Naturally, I paused to look up. What was I met wit
...more
Lori
Aug 17, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: reviewed
Can't count how many times I've read this. It's brilliant. No, that doesn't do it justice. It's...
And The Simpsons very first Halloween episode did a good job with it too. 👤
...more
Luís
One freezing December evening, a man also in his room, dozing over his book, thought of Lenore, his now-deceased sweetheart.
But noise at her door knocked her out of her reverie. After making several hypotheses and finally making up its mind, it opens up and, despite its inactivity, to a majestic crow. Amused but intrigued, he stupidly asks her name. The raven then responds, "Never again". The narrator questions himself and asks other questions.
But the crow responds every time, Never again.
Paraly
...more
Bonnie
Dec 29, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Once upon a midnight dreary,
while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume
of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping,
suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping,
rapping at my chamber door.
"'Tis some visiter," I muttered,
"tapping at my chamber door --
Only this, and nothing more."




I had started reading the Raven before but was never able to quite get through it. When I came across this illustrated version at my library I decided to give it another shot.
...more
Samra Yusuf
Apr 01, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: poetry
You know the place between sleep and wake, the place where you can still remember dreaming, it’s a worst place to be in when you no longer can sleep nor can dream.we,the humans are a doomed species who ever breathed on planet earth, the moments we cherish turns into memories, the things we desire become wishes, the people we love turns into strangers, and the present we live becomes past…
We all live our dear life with a feel of loss, we all devise altered approaches to seek peace, we all at some
...more
Alejandro
Jan 15, 2019 rated it really liked it
Nevermore!


RAISE RAVENS...

First of all, two things...

...one, I classified this poem as a "short story" since I haven't read so much poetry as to justify a tag for that in my personal list to describe books...

...two, I rated 4 stars, since kinda the same reason, due I haven't developed a knack for poetry, but since I was curious about this poem by Edgar Allan Poe, still I read it, and certainly I liked it quite a bit, but it's some hard to enjoy for me poetry. Nobody's fault.

This is easily
...more
Reading_ Tamishly
Sep 20, 2019 rated it really liked it
To be honest, I picked up this one seeing the word 'illustrated' and (oh boy!) I am not disappointed.
Reading this one has taken out the part of my being which LOVES dark themes of human imagination.
I totally fell for the dark, black and white themed gory illustration!

Then there's the story in poetry format which I absolutely loved reading.

I don't think I would have loved this one without the illustrations.
I love the play of words and the classic rhyming pattern.
This has got my imagination run wi
...more
Lisa
Jun 25, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: poetry
Look who’s tweeting now!

Fear for fear’s sake - Delusions empowered!



Heard it on The Scarecrow News last night. A tale of ominous foreboding. Tapping, rapping, something happening in the world, filling the soul with fear and worry. What happened last night in the barren field? The Scarecrow shouts it out:

“Who would believe it? The ravens? We let many in, and it has caused problems we wouldn’t have thought possible!”

But what happened? Rumours spread. Thousands and thousands of ravens attacked the
...more
Michael Sorbello
A macabre poem depicting a man driven to excruciating loneliness and grief from being unable to let go of the memories of his dead lover Lenore. It's a tragic tale full of death and sorrow, a tale of how one's unwillingness to let go of dark memories and past tragedies will only push them to the edge of insanity. A gothic classic.

***

If you're looking for ambient music that's perfect for reading fantasy, horror, sci-fi, comics, manga and other books like this one, then be sure to check out my You
...more
Jaya
So what do you do when you can’t sleep even the clock tell you its 2’o clock of the night? You creep yourself out by reading creepy poems where a Raven talks back to you, saying ...Nevermore...
Still can’t sleep? Listen to this rendition. (It mostly scares the daylights out of me)
Here are two of my most favorite passages, which I could once, long time back, in another lifetime, recite by rote
Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mo
...more
Jon Nakapalau
Wonderful art captures the impending doom that permeates this poem - listen to Christopher Lee recite this poem on YouTube as you turn the pages...SENDS SHIVERS DOWN MY SPINE!
leynes
Aug 05, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
My only advice for reading Poe's The Raven is that you try to read it out loud as if you were performing it in front of a crowd, only then you can grab the true mastery of what this poem does on a phonetic side as well! This poem gave me chills; I will treasure it from here on out for the rest of my life.
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some on
...more
Ivan
Jul 21, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I'm not big fan of poetry but I really loved this one. Maybe it's because I listened to version read by Christopher Lee (you can find it on youtube), and it's universal rule that everything is better when heard in voice of Christopher Lee, but this is my favorite work of Poe so far. ...more
Charles  van Buren
Charles van Buren
TOP 1000 REVIEWER

1.0 out of 5 stars
No illustrations in this illustrated edition

July 11, 2019
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

Review of free Kindle edition
A Public Domain Book
Publication date: May 17, 2012
Language: English
ASIN: B0084B68X0

This edition is supposed to be illustrated by Gustave Dore' but as I have come to expect from free Kindle editions the illustrations are missing. There is a list of the illustrations and even the names of the engravers but no Gustave Dore'
...more
Peter Meredith
Feb 14, 2012 rated it really liked it
I write this review as someone who dislikes poetry, or maybe I should say, before I'm attacked by the poetry police, that I have disliked every poem forced down my throat by well meaning sadistic teachers. (Someone please explain the antithetical concept of a well meaning sadist. I'm afraid I might have made that up and it makes no sense.)
The Raven I enjoyed. Perhaps because of its length. For me, a poem can't be too long. The longer the poem, the higher my risk of death(probably through suicide
...more
The Bibliophile Doctor
Changing my rating from 3 to 5 stars after reread.

#1/148

Recently I joined a Poe reading challenge on Goodreads for a classic book club and what an interesting challenge it is. I can not thank much to the moderators coz it is gonna be a hell of a ride.

I'm of course a big fan of poems and that too Edgar Allan Poe yes, yes, yes.

Sorry Poe for rating it so low before. But the naive 4 years younger me could not see beyond words, could not see the pain and sadness that slowly starts building with Rave
...more
Nick Pageant
Jun 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I read this yesterday for probably the 150th time and want to say thanks to dear old Edgar.
I teach therapeutic writing to some quite reluctant students. They literally groan when they see me coming. Each class I struggle to find material that they will relate to in some small way. I chose this standard out of equal parts desperation and resignation... and it worked. Eyes lit up! Comments were made! Unity of effect in good poetry was discussed! Thank you, Edgar Allan Poe, you saved my butt.

As t
...more
Carol
Mar 15, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Death and Sorrow

A tragic and creepy poem about a RAVEN who hauntingly appears as a (spirit?) 'rapping' on a man's door who is distraught over the loss of his love Lenore. (or did the man murder Lenore and the Raven came to collect his soul?)

The last verse: "And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor-------Shall be lifted Nevermore".

...more
Christian Nikitas
Sep 23, 2020 rated it really liked it
Listened for the second time by different person. Second listen was so much better, probably because the reader read with such feeling.
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The name Poe brings to mind images of murderers and madmen, premature burials, and mysterious women who return from the dead. His works have been in print since 1827 and include such literary classics as The Tell-Tale Heart, The Raven, and The Fall of the House of Usher. This versatile writer’s oeuvre includes short stories, poetry, a novel, a textbook, a book of scientific theory, and hundreds of ...more

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“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door —
Only this, and nothing more."

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; — vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow — sorrow for the lost Lenore —
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore —
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me — filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating,
Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door —
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; —
This it is, and nothing more."

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
Sir," said I, "or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you"— here I opened wide the door; —
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, "Lenore?"
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, "Lenore!" —
Merely this, and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice:
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore —
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; —
'Tis the wind and nothing more."

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door —
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door —
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore.
Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore —
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!"
Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

Much I marveled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning— little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blest with seeing bird above his chamber door —
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as "Nevermore.”
2963 likes
“Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.” 1055 likes
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