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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

4.11  ·  Rating details ·  64,660 ratings  ·  8,787 reviews
In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.

Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. H
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ebook, 359 pages
Published April 18th 2017 by Doubleday
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Marji Morris If you don't want to buy the hardcover book, go to your library and borrow it there. You'll want to see the photos, map, etc., I think. I don't know…moreIf you don't want to buy the hardcover book, go to your library and borrow it there. You'll want to see the photos, map, etc., I think. I don't know if you will want to reread the book or not, but you'll certainly think about it for a long time after reading.(less)
Warren It's a well documented narrative (a history) of several issues. The Osage being forced to live in a region that later was discovered to be rich in…moreIt's a well documented narrative (a history) of several issues. The Osage being forced to live in a region that later was discovered to be rich in oil. How the U.S. government and local government agencies and individuals took advantage by manipulating the "laws", creating polices and murders to control and steal the oil money. The corrupted and or incompetent investigations and how an honest law enforcement investigation was launched by a newly formed and problematic FBI. (less)

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Jeffrey Keeten
”Today our hearts are divided between two worlds. We are strong and courageous, learning to walk in these two worlds, hanging on to the threads of our culture and traditions as we live in a predominantly non-Indian society. Our history, our culture, our heart, and our home will always be stretching our legs across the plains, singing songs in the morning light, and placing our feet down with the ever beating heart of the drum. We walk in two worlds.”

The Osage Indians lived in Kansas until the 18
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Elyse Walters
Jun 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Reading about injustice -historical tragedies--such greed - such ugliness---does something to us. It's hard to explain the depths of what transforms.
We feel the anger... the incredible unfairness. We feel different- changed in ways - after reading a book like this. It's the type of book that makes me want to 'do something'.

White people cheated Indians out of their land! That we 'knew'.... but there is much in this small book many people are not aware of. Author David Grann kept peeling off the
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Trish
That we as a nation, less than one hundred years after the Osage Indian killings, have no collective memory of these events seems an intentional erasure. The truth of the killings would traumatize our school children and make every one of us search our souls, of that there is no doubt. David Grann shows us that the systematic killings of dozens of oil-wealthy Osage Indians were not simply the rogue deeds of a psychopath or two in a small town in Oklahoma.

The tentacles of guilt and the politics
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Diane S ☔
May 06, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I don't know why or even how, after all I have read, I can still be surprised at man's cunning and greed. I knew nothing about the Osage Indians, certainly nothing about headrights that provided them with a great deal of money.It is the money and the way the law was provisioned that made them a target for the unscrupulous and there were plenty of those.

This is the story of the investigation into murders that until Hoover involved himself and his men, we're virtually shoved under the rug and goi
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Julie
Apr 11, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann is a 2017 Doubleday publication.

A Conspiracy is everything that ordinary life is not. It’s the inside game, cold, sure, undistracted, forever closed off to us. We are the flawed ones, the innocents, trying to make some rough sense of the daily jostle. Conspirators have a logic, and a daring beyond our reach. All conspiracies are the same taut story of men who find coherence in a criminal act- Don Delillo

This is a stunning historical true crime 'novel'
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Liz
Jun 16, 2017 rated it it was amazing
A good nonfiction book will read as fast as a good piece of fiction, all the while imparting new knowledge to the reader. Destiny of the Republic, by Candice Millard, is a prime example. Now comes Killers of the Flower Moon. Enthralling, it tells not only of the killing spree against the Osage, but the rise of the oil industry, the development of private detectives and the Bureau of Investigation ( the precursor to the FBI) and the political corruption of the day.

It's a sad look back on the pre
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Matthew
Mar 28, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: True crime and history buffs
3 to 3.5 stars

Interesting and eye opening. A scary true story of greed and racism in the development of the American West. This is one of those hard to read and accept truths of American history. If you enjoy history and/or true crime I think this is worth giving a go.

My main criticism is that while the story is interesting, I am not quite sure it is book worthy. It seems like this whole story could have been told in 30 to 50 pages or in a Wikipedia article. It feels a bit drawn out when expande
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Diane
Apr 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing
This is the best nonfiction book I've read this year. I've enjoyed David Grann's earlier work, but this latest one is just fantastic.

Killers of the Flower Moon tells a story I hadn't heard before: The "Reign of Terror" in the 1920s, when white folk were murdering dozens of Osage Indians in a despicable attempt to steal their money and rights to Oklahoma oil reserves. This case occurred during the beginnings of the FBI, and J. Edgar Hoover used it as marketing tool for the agency.

This book is ric
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Linda
"We Indians cannot get our rights in these courts and I have no chance at all of saving this land for my children." (Widow of Joe Bates, Osage Nation, 1921)

No horror novella could possibly mirror the horrendous crimes that were visited upon the Osage Indian Nation in the 1920's. The catastrophic bungling of crime evidence, the leaks and sabotage, and the willful insidious behavior by unscrupulous individuals is mind-boggling. The devil and his cohorts wore well-pressed suits and walked among the
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PorshaJo
Lies, greed, murder, cover-ups....what a frightful Halloween read. Except this one is a true story, which makes it even more frightening. This is the true story of the Osage Indians. How they were taken advantage of and belittled by everyone. In the early 19th century, they were forced from their lands and eventually ended up taking up residence on Indian territory, which is now known as Oklahoma. Then, in the early 20th century, there was found to be oil on those lands. They had a headright on ...more
Paula Kalin
This book was nominated for a lot of awards, but for me it didn’t live up to it’s praise. The cold-blooded murders of the Osage American Indians was a tragic part of American history. Full of greed and racism. The book, however, was too long and repetitive. The greed behind the murders and the disregard for Osage lives was not enough for a full book. There wasn’t much written about the birth of the FBI either. I would have liked to have seen more.

I listened to the audiobook and wasn’t impressed
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Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
David Grann, a journalist, has done an excellent job investigating and chronicling the terrible story of the Osage American Indian murders in the 1920s. It's a chilling story - hard to believe it's true, hard to believe people could be so cruel and callous. Hard to believe I've never heard of this before.

In about 1904, the Osage tribe had negotiated a contract with the U.S. government; tellingly, their lawyer was able to slip in a clause that all oil, gas and other mineral rights on their land w
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PattyMacDotComma
5★
“He was six feet four and had the sinewy limbs and the eerie composure of a gunslinger. Even when dressed in a stiff suit, like a door-to-door salesman, he seemed to have sprung from a mythic age.”


John Wayne? No, but if this had been written right after it happened and Hollywood had made a movie of it, John Wayne would have played Tom White, the special agent in charge of the Bureau of Investigation’s field office in Houston.

He was described as “an impressive sight in his large, suede Stetson
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Montzalee Wittmann
Sep 21, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann was a difficult book to read because of all the injustice to the Osage people and victims especially. What a horrible stain on our history. I wish it was a compulsory book for high school kids to read and discuss today. Would it make a difference? I don't know but there is so much white-washing in the history books as it is. This was a book for our reading group and I am so glad it was picked or I probably woul ...more
Beata
Aug 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This is a powefrul book on murders committed on Osage people during the second decade of the 20th century. The author is an investigative journalist and does a tremendous job bringing this tragic story to the general public. I was astounded and could not put this book down...
Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
Jun 23, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: recent-favorites
A good book friend of mine says that the best nonfiction reads like fiction, and Killers of the Flower Moon is that. I soak up any books seeped in culture. What I learned about Osage culture was a corollary to the compelling, deeply disturbing, Reign of Terror that happened to the Osage during the early 1900s. I saw this book covered on The View earlier this week, which pleased me because this is one of those important books you wish everyone would read. Compassion would run a little deeper, and ...more
Perry
Apr 26, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
Malfeasance toward Osage Inherent in the System Intended to Protect Them
[revised/improved May 15, 2017]

In the 1870s, the United States government drove the Osage nation in herds onto a small reservation in Oklahoma, situated on a relatively small tract which was chosen because its rocky terrain was particularly unsuited to agriculture and thus undesirable to sooners arriving from the East to stake land claims.

Forty years later, after the discovery of vast reserves of oil below this barren land,
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Matt
“History is a merciless judge. It lays bare our tragic blunders and foolish missteps and exposes our most intimate secrets, wielding the power of hindsight like an arrogant detective who seems to know the end of the mystery from the outset.”
- David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon


David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon is an irresistible combination: part history, part true crime, and part journalistic memoir, it sheds a bright light on a dark corner of our nation’s history, one that has been
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Brandon Forsyth
Aug 26, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
It's been a few months since a book truly grabbed me, both heart and mind, and wouldn't let me go. David Grann's latest is a compelling argument that he is the finest narrative non-fiction writer alive today. The story here is unbelievable, thrilling and heartbreaking, and the reporting is first-rate, penetrating and immersive. A moving elegy about the horrible abuses inflicted on indigenous peoples, a crackling whodunit set in the lawless frontier, a sobering examination of the corrupting influ ...more
Dianne
Nov 13, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: best-of-2017
This is a remarkable and horrifying piece of American history that screams to be read! I had never heard of the Osage "Reign of Terror." This true story is really a dual story; the mass murder of wealthy Osage Indians in Oklahoma for their oil headrights in the 1920s and 30s and the forming of the FBI.

It's an amazing piece of investigative reporting and very well put together. There are so many characters it can be hard to keep track of who is who, but hang in there. If you think the U.S. is me
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L.A. Starks
Jun 11, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Everyone should read this book.

I grew up in the county next to Osage, bought the book at an indie bookstore nearby when Grann was on his tour, and have researched Oklahoma history. So I am more familiar than most with the Osage saga, having heard the general stories.

However, Grann has done a phenomenal job of researching as many of the Osage murders as possible (twenty-four are documented but there appear to have been far more), and of giving a picture of the ongoing predation to which the Osag
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Bark
This book pieces together a brutal piece of history and unravels an ugly murder mystery. It’s disturbing, depressing and, at least for me, not at all the fast moving read I was led to believe from some of the early reviews. Maybe it’s just me, but I had a difficult time sticking with it. There were so many people involved and random details tossed in that didn’t seem to move things along that to me it seemed a little too over-stuffed and hard to follow at times. Perhaps it should’ve been a littl ...more
Michael Ferro
Jul 16, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Grann's reportage is both engrossing due to its thoroughly researched nature, and because of his adept skill as a well-rounded storyteller. KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON was a book that I had heard plenty about, obviously, and when I picked it up and read the synopsis, I suppose I was no different from many others who thought: "Murdered Native Americans? Perhaps hundreds of them? For their oil money?? A potential FBI cover-up!? WHEN? HOW?" Of course, I couldn't wait to start reading; I was certainl ...more
Dem
Jun 30, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
What an amazing insight into The Osage Indian murders which occurred in the early 1920s in Osage county Oklahoma. I had never heard of these murders and when I read reviews on this book by David Grann I really was keen to learn what happened to these people.

Between 1921 and 1925 over 60 Osage were killed, and these crimes appear to have been committed by greedy individuals in order to take over the Osage lands which were rich in oil and were worth vast sums of money. Newspapers of the time desc
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Esil
Jul 23, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: netgalley, audiobook
By a complete twist of history, the Osage who were ousted from their own land during the 19th century were relocated to a part of the US that turned out to be a huge source of oil. While the oil brought tremendous prosperity to the Osage, it also brought greedy unscrupulous assassins who decimated and terrified these people with little protection from law enforcement or the courts. I listened to the audio of Killers of the Flower Moon. The three parts are cleverly read by different narrators. Th ...more
DeB MaRtEnS
Killer's of the Flower Moon is a scorching exposé of a terrible period in American history. In the 1920s, when the American West still retained elements of lawlessness and secret codes of misplaced justice, in Oklahoma there were criminals hidden and their crimes unsolved, while these powerful white men profited off the Osage Indians misfortunes.

The Osage Indians had been pushed off of their homeland and designated reserve in Kansas with the arrival of more and more white settlers. Frustrated,
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JanB
May 24, 2018 rated it it was amazing

The blurb: “In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe….Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. The newly created F.B.I. took up the case, in what became one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations.”

This book surpasses any fictional murder mystery – the fact th
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LeAnne
Jun 21, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
EDITED UPDATE: I recently saw that the works of Laura Ingalls wilder have now been put on some sort of list of controversial books. Because she and her books are mentioned here in this nonfictional account, I wonder if that had something to do with it. I mean really, when was the last time you had someone bring up Laura Ingalls Wilder as semi-racist? Pretty ridiculous.

ORIGINAL REVIEW:

Okay, think right now about your neighborhood or your apartment complex. Consider your various neighbors and that
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William2
Jun 25, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 21-ce, history, nonfiction, us
The depiction of human venality here will set your hair on fire. The Osage Indians, whose reservation happened to be on a major oil reserve, were in the 1920s set upon by an army of white grifters who murdered them for their wealth. And the entire white institutional infrastructure in and around Osage County, Oklahoma—lawyers, bankers, judges, retailers, housewives et al.—were complicit in the killing. The book is an object lesson in concise storytelling. It contains nothing superfluous. It’s a ...more
Char
Killers of the Flower Moon is the true story of the slaughter of dozens of Osage Indians and how MANY people got away with it. It's SO over the top that if this were a fiction story I would say the author had overwritten it and that it wasn't realistic. David Grann has come at this story from two angles.

The Osage tribe reigned over much of the mid-west back in the day. By the time of this book, roughly the early 1920's, they were mostly moved onto what was thought to be worthless land in Okla
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1,152 followers
David Grann has written about everything from New York City’s antiquated water tunnels to the hunt for the giant squid to the presidential campaign. His stories have appeared in several anthologies, including What We Saw: The Events of September 11, 2001; The Best American Crime Writing, of both 2004 and 2005; and The Best American Sports Writing, of 2003 and 2006. A 2004 finalist for the Michael ...more
“History is a merciless judge. It lays bare our tragic blunders and foolish missteps and exposes our most intimate secrets, wielding the power of hindsight like an arrogant detective who seems to know the end of the mystery from the outset.” 24 likes
“As Sherlock Holmes famously said, “When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” 10 likes
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