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Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal
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Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal

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4.29  ·  Rating details ·  215 ratings  ·  18 reviews
In a world of costly prime cuts—stately crown roasts, plump pork chops, and regal racks of lamb—it’s easy to forget about (and steer clear of) the more economical, but less lovable parts of the beast—bellies, brains, cheeks, combs, gizzards, hearts, hocks, kidneys, lungs, marrow, necks, shanks, spleens, tongues, trotters, and, oh yes, testicles.

Historically, these so-call
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Hardcover, 256 pages
Published September 13th 2011 by Ten Speed Press (first published January 1st 2011)
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Average rating 4.29  · 
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 ·  215 ratings  ·  18 reviews


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Tuck
Apr 09, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: wine-and-food
author won beard award for "fat"

from top to bottom and all inside outsides too

nice disquisition on tongue

grossest (to me)? sanguinaccio all napoletana and chocolate blood ice cream
but other than that, super book. some pics, but needs more

working on this opac so perfunctory reviews at best

http://stwr.ent.sirsi.net/client/defa...
Justin
Sep 26, 2018 rated it really liked it
Covers a wide range of animal parts including many I wouldn't have though of.
There aren't many pictures so it is hard for me to tell what I'd like to cook.
Also a bit pork heavy for me.
Melinda
I enjoyed this cookbook / book very much. Coming from a tradition of farmers, I feel like I am not so far away as some people perhaps in understanding where our food comes from, and have eaten some of the "odd bits" she mentions. We still have family references to "hog killing weather" in the fall when the weather turns very cold and sharp. However, this book has pushed me to think a bit more about finding and then cooking portions that I never would have otherwise tried -- tripe is one, marrow ...more
Anula
Dec 20, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: cookbook-meat
Great book if you're trying to familiarize yourself with the "head to tail cooking". Coming from Poland I'm used to eating pig's trotters, beef cheeks, tongue (which I'm not a fan of...), livers etc. but there are still parts of animals that I haven't tried, simply because I wasn't confident enough to do so. This book is great starting point, for those more experienced cooks of offal and those only starting to discover that part of the butchery. all in all - a great book that I can definitely re ...more
Samantha Ek
Feb 06, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: diets-recipes
Yes, it is a cookbook that you can actually read! Full of some history as to the way we used to eat the "odd bits" plus some recipes for each part. Thankfully they skipped the eyeballs, though it was mentioned. I am not a fan of eyes, just the thought of them and they gross me out.
Most of the recipes in this book I will never eat or try, as they are organs and I personally don't eat organs.
I did learn that you can cook with animal blood... who knew!
The book had wonderful photography
...more
Nicole
Dec 17, 2011 rated it really liked it
I really enjoyed reading this cookbook. The descriptions of how to prepare all of these "odd bits" was something I needed in order to deal with those that had been coming my way during my culinary adventures. The recipes are mostly geared towards western tastes, but now that I have a clearer idea on how to handle theses cuts, I feel more confident tackling Asian recipes containing them. Definitely a keeper. Note: the cover cannot get even a drop of water on it without the brown coming off. It wo ...more
Jeff
Jan 11, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: education
my wife got this for Christmas last year and I really enjoyed it because I hunt and have always tried to use more of the animal. Now I can! This book really is a cookbook, but it is also an intriguing history of odd bits of animals through time and space. many of the recipes are not for those losing weight or even just trying to guard their health because the entire book is saturated with fat. I am learning about cooking with many interesting ingredients though. I read it cover to cover and it c ...more
Dan
Jul 16, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A great read, thoroughly engaging, completely enjoyable. Not exactly the typical words one might think of for what is, essentially, a combo cookbook and primer on offal, or "variety meats". But, it's so well written and so interesting that I found myself not only reading everything with interest, right down to techniques in the recipes and the how-tos of preparing some of the more unusual cuts, but even flipping back and forth and going back and re-reading sections that were referenced to get a ...more
Spuddie
Oct 16, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: keepers
For those who believe in eating "nose to tail" or utilizing the whole animal, this is a great cookbook and reference. And even if you're not sure about it...it's very enlightening and provides some less intimidating recipes for things you might have never dreamed of eating. Fits in very well with my waste not, want not philosophy. :)
Mike
Jan 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: food
If you have the slightest interest in this book, read it. Totally awesome cookbook.

I was ever-so-slightly bothered that a lot of the recipes were similar (think: sear, slow cook, serve with sauce of reduced cooking liquid). Apparently not bothered enough to rate it fewer than 5 stars...
Victoria O'Neal
Jan 09, 2016 rated it liked it
I skimmed the recipes and read the explication, and there are lots of new animal bits I want to eat now. But not brains. For such an adventurous eater, I have a very primal revulsion about eating brains. Also, Ms. McLagan needed a thesaurus. Creamy, chewy, and crunchy were repeated way too often.
Andrew Terentyev
Sep 07, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Five stars for accessibility. I'm an experienced eater, but an amateur cook at best. Having never cooked offal before, the recipes in this book were really easy to approach and came out very well (relative to my skills).
Krista D.
Jul 14, 2013 rated it liked it
The recipes were good. The lecturing did get to me after a while, so after a while I skipped the commentary completely.
alonso ruvalcaba
Sep 20, 2014 rated it liked it
demasiado chistosito.
Nancy Moffett
Jan 04, 2012 rated it really liked it
Can you read a cookbook? I enjoyed the reading material, looked at the recipes, and plan to keep my eye out for "odd bits" to cook in the future. Very interesting reading.
Stinkfinger
Jul 18, 2012 rated it it was amazing
very tasty and full of info
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