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Fulgrim

(The Horus Heresy #5)

3.97  ·  Rating details ·  5,888 ratings  ·  260 reviews
It is the 31st millennium, and humanity is at the peak of its powers. As the Great Crusade, led by Warmaster Horus, continues to conquer the galaxy, Fulgrim, Primarch of the Emperor’s Children, leads his warriors into battle against a vile alien foe. From the blood of this campaign are sown the seeds that will lead this proud Legion to treachery, taking them down the darke ...more
Paperback, 512 pages
Published July 31st 2007 by Games Workshop (first published July 2007)
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3.97  · 
Rating details
 ·  5,888 ratings  ·  260 reviews


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Keamy Loken
Aug 08, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Well other teenage girls obsess vampires or werewolves and are busy making their babies, I was busy making babies with pre-heresy Emperor's Children. (I don't think I'd live through it all after heresy...or it wouldn't matter.)

OK that off my mind, amazing book! Possibly a few spoilers.
Things I liked:

1. Fulgrim's personality. Reminds me of my younger sister, only she's probably not gonna fall for a demon sword talking to her.

2. Fulgrim's fall to chaos was well done, I once had a warhammer 40k fr
...more
Gianfranco Mancini


The tale about the fall to Slaanesh of the III Legion is not just a book.

It is a tragedy, an epic and morbid tale about brotherhood, weakness, corruption, depravity and betrayal, with echoes from Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and Michael Moorcock's "Stormbringer" (Graham McNeill's love for Elric had been already shown for good in his Warhammer fantasy books, but here is just over the top).
Still one of the best Horus Heresy novels after years, and my second read was far more good tha
...more
Robert
Jun 22, 2011 rated it really liked it
After a near-perfect run up until now, the fifth book In the Horus Heresy begins to show some cracks, chiefly around Graham McNeill's biggest stumbling block; Characterisation. At a whopping 512 pages, this is a story which is in no hurry to be told which would not be a problem if there was a central character to cling onto, instead there's absolutely no-one to match up to the previous books' heroes so we're stuck with Fulgrim. For 512 pages.
The further problem with the Emperor's Children as a l
...more
Thomas Edmund
Aug 11, 2017 rated it liked it
Fulgrim was an odd installment of the H-Heresy for me. There was some really good scenes and moments, but ultimately the sprawl of events characters and events was just to disconnected and jarring for me to enjoy. There was little tension in Fulgrim's story as we mostly knew where it was going, and his 'corruption' was too on the nose even for the unsubtle 40K universe.

I had mixed feelings about Solomon, at first I thought "here we go another honourable captain to be the good-guy stand-in while
...more
Amanda
Jul 06, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Well now... I enjoyed Graham McNeill's last outing in the Horus Heresy (False Gods), although found the pacing a little uneven at times. Fulgrim, for me, shows a writer with an enormous amount of confidence. McNeill has improved immeasurably on False Gods, and presents a novel that is truly epic in scope.

Fulgrim is structured brilliantly. We're shown the Emperor's Children before the fall - an exceptionally proud Legion searching for perfection in everything. There are strong characters showcase
...more
Troy
Oct 11, 2007 rated it did not like it
Shelves: wh40k, horus-heresy
I really tried to like this book but for me it had a lot of things going against it. I've never been a big fan of Graham McNeill but I thought he did a good job with "False Gods". In Fulgrim nothing works for me. I think this book is about Fulgrim's fall into Chaos but since Fulgrim and the other Emperor's Children (with the exception of Saul Tarvitz) have been depicted as arrogant pricks in the previous stories they are not sympathetic characters. Without sympathetic characters this "fall from ...more
David Guymer
Aug 18, 2016 rated it really liked it
Similar to The Flight of the Eisenstein, which came before, Fulgrim begins some way prior to where the preceding novels ended, around the time of False Gods I believe, this time exploring the build-up to the Heresy from the perspective of the Emperor's Children.

This book achieved a number of spectacular things:

1) it gave me just a smidgeon of sympathy for Lord Commander Eidolon
2) those rather silly sonic weapons now seem perfectly sensible
3) the Emperor's Children are now number one in my Chapt
...more
Matthew
Oct 23, 2017 rated it really liked it
McNeill delivers. As always. Well worth checking out.
Linton Newton
The best book in the series so far. A brilliant tragedy.
Bart Tredway
Jul 26, 2009 rated it it was amazing
I am really having a hard time believing that so many people didn't like this book. While i can understand the perspective of others that said that this installment of the Horus Heresy series was "formulaic" and were otherwise disappointed in this book, i really think that this book is where the series evolves from a "shoot-'em-up" and intrigue-driven storyline, to unmask the truly sublime forces which are driving the entire Horus Heresy itself. Graham McNeill is at his very best here, being abl ...more
Alain DeWitt
Jun 04, 2012 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2012
I like the plot, the setting and the action, but the writing style is really starting to get on my nerves. I've mentioned this in previous reviews of volumes in this series, but the constant use of superlatives is really getting on my nerves. It makes the writing melodramatic and over the top. If everyone is perfect and everything is epic, then nothing is. Good thing these are quick reads.
Seán
Jun 15, 2018 rated it really liked it
Another excellent book in the Horus Heresy series. This was possibly my favourite so far, but I could definitely see it as one that others may prefer to skip. It's a classic Faustian story that shows us the horrific effects Chaos can have on Mankind. The side-story focuses on the artists on-board the Emperor's Children's flagship, and uses the idea of the pursuit of the perfect piece of art and the extreme places this may lead to mirror the story of Fulgrim and his troops' own experiments with C ...more
Monsour
Jan 12, 2019 rated it really liked it
Well that escalated quickly.

Review later
Brian
Jan 06, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: sci-fi, warhammer-40k
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Marko
Nov 15, 2012 rated it it was amazing
The perfect brother falls...


We have struggled for months to accomplish this task on our own when it should have been clear that we could not. In all things we strive to eradicate weakness, but it is not weakness to ask for help, my brothers. It is weakness to deny that help is needed.

Julius laughed and said, ‘Get some sleep, Solomon, you understand? Or did that crash scramble your brains too?’ ‘Sleep?’ said Solomon, slumping back onto the bed. ‘I’ll sleep when I’m dead.’

(...) a truth that is tol
...more
Dylan Murphy
When I first read Fulgrim a few years ago, it cemented itself as my favourite book of all time. Reading it again in the glorious hardcover collector's edition complete with some awesome(and some ok) internal artwork as well as an author afterword was just as amazing as I remember.

The novel focuses on the Emperor's Children's fall to Slaanesh. The Emperor's Children just happen to my my all time favourite Legion and Warband(s) and Slaanesh is my Chaos God(dess) of choice! So naturally just based
...more
Aske
Unfortunately for the Horus Heresy series this is where it really starts to repeat itself. While The Flight of the Eisenstein was just the same story as in the previous books, it was still fresh because it was the first time we really stepped out of the established characters and followed some one totally new who really comes into his own at the end of the story. The plot and the writing was also good enough for it to still feel new.

Fulgrim, however, feels very much like the same story just told
...more
Alexander Draganov
Feb 22, 2015 rated it really liked it
Really torn between giving this four stars or five, but this time I have decided not be generous, mainly because of the ending, which seems to contradict other sources of lore and the beginning, which is way to sluggish. Nevertheless this was a strong, insanely epic novel with some of the greatest scenes of action and of corruption I have read in the genre. Fulgrim is also probably the best character in the HH series so far. Overall, a great book which will please fans of the epic and savage tal ...more
David
Sep 16, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: science-fiction
I think that Fulgrim (and the Emperor's Children's) descent into hedonism and sadism is probably the most well-written book in the Horus Heresy series thus far, with some call-backs to the Poet William Blake, and allusions to the works of Oscar Wilde, Husymans, and de Sade. The unsettling creepiness and depravity of the legion's vanity and corruption gradually build throughout the book until it boils over in the build up to the battle at Isstvan V.
Tarl
May 26, 2018 rated it liked it
This is my third or fourth time reading this book. The first time had been because I was reading the series, the other two or three times because I was looking for inspiration for an Emperor's Children army.

I have a love/hate relationship with this novel. Every time previous that I have read this novel, I was always amazed and impressed by McNeill's use of the normal human artists to help show the corruption of the legion with each step forward that they took down the path to damnation. On this
...more
Dave
May 03, 2015 rated it really liked it
I’ve reviewed some of The Black Library’s “Warhammer 40,000” novels here before. I’ve talked about how I’m addicted to them and they’re a fun mash up of elements from “Star Wars,” “Dune,” the works of H.P. Lovecraft, and Tolkein style fantasy that have a heavy metal visual aesthetic and often feature morally gray themes. If you like all that stuff do yourself a favor and check out some of those books. They take place in a fascinating and well constructed dystopian sci-fi fantasy universe.

What I
...more
Robert
Mar 25, 2019 rated it liked it
Probably my second fave book in the monolithic HH series.

This book follows the slow fall of the chapter known as The Emperor's Children and anyone who knows anything about 40K knows exactly what kind of depravity you can expect when someone is tempted by the Chaos god of excess, pleasure and carnal desire...

And yet the book can't make up it's mind on what it wants to be. Gore is typically graphic as you'd expect from a 40K novel. Blood and guts are described in painful detail - but you can't tal
...more
Primo S.
Jul 26, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: sci-fi, 40k
The fourth book in the Horus Heresy series tells the story of Primarch Fulgrim's descent into chaos and all the shenanigans that come with it. While this isn't my favorite Horus Heresy book so far, this book, particularly the second half, has some of the best moments I've read in any 40K book.

The main reason why this isn't my favorite is that I didn't find the first half very engaging. Lots of worldbuilding and character building that doesn't pay off until late in the book, and most of them done
...more
Steve
Mar 26, 2018 rated it really liked it
I have such mixed feelings about this entry! (note, lots of spoilers, just in case)

One the one hand, this is probably the best depiction of the fall to Chaos so far - and it's done over the course of one book as opposed to three. And that can't be overstated! In a series that is, thus far, ALL ABOUT groups being swayed to corruption and betrayal, having that descent rendered so well is a very strong point indeed.

On the other hand, this entry has some really underwhelming, amateurish sections - a
...more
Kdawg91
Mar 13, 2018 rated it really liked it
yes, I am still in my Warhammer deep dive, and WOW. I got into the Emperor's Children legion mostly due to the Fabius Bile book I read, I found him very interesting. At first glance, you can totally see why the legion falls into the clutches of chaos. They for the most part, are TOTALLY the over achievers, pretty boys that succeed in everything they touch. You kind of want them to fall, but then when it happens............boy does it happen.

I give Graham McNeill credit for making me cringe at t
...more
Cerianne
Jul 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: borrowed
Suprisingly I loved this book as much as I loved the first trilogy, especially reading about the decline of such a proud legion and how it was possible for such a thing to even happen, all the way up to Isstvan V. Claimed this book from a friend the moment he got the box set so that I could continue reading, as he was still to start at #1.
Miss Jools
Aug 12, 2018 rated it really liked it
First ever Audible book - amazing narrator! Really enjoyed listening to this while walking home, doing housework etc.
The fall of Filgrim is pretty gripping, and of course there are lots of battles. The remembrancer plots sometimes were not as interesting as the main storyline. Will listen to the next one as well 😀
Anders
I had a hard time it for the first two thirds of the book (somewhere between 1-2 stars) but the last third was a solid four stars, hence three. It was a great story from the beginning to the end. It might be that I just find it hard to adjust to a new author for each book in the series, I don't know.
Jonathan
Aug 01, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: sci-fi
Graham McNeill does a much better job with the motivations and tragedy of Fulgrim's legion than he did with Horus' in "False Gods." It was a little bloated, but overall a very well done novel and good addition to the Horus Heresy story-line.

As always, part of me couldn't help but hope for some semblance of a Loyalist victory, but in this series, things can only get worse...
Kaleb Fromme
The book Fulgrim is book number 5 I believe in the 50+ book series The Horus Heresy, which is apart of the Warhammer 40k grimdark future. The main focus was the descent of the Primarch, Fulgrim, into the clutches of Chaos, and the changing of the Emperors Children from Imperial Space Marines (Super soldiers) into Chaos Space Marines. The action started off a bit slow, but about a third of the way through the book, it started ramping up and was like a train going off the rails. The gore also star ...more
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508 followers
Hailing from Scotland, Graham McNeill narrowly escaped a career in surveying to work for Games Workshop as a games designer. He has a strong following with his novels Nightbringer, Warriors of Ultramar, Dead Sky, Black Sun and Storm of Iron.

Other books in the series

The Horus Heresy (1 - 10 of 93 books)
  • Horus Rising (Horus Heresy #1)
  • False Gods (Horus Heresy #2)
  • Galaxy in Flames (The Horus Heresy #3)
  • The Flight of the Eisenstein (The Horus Heresy #4)
  • Descent of Angels (The Horus Heresy #6)
  • Legion (The Horus Heresy #7)
  • Battle for the Abyss (The Horus Heresy #8)
  • Mechanicum (The Horus Heresy #9)
  • Tales of Heresy (The Horus Heresy #10)
  • Fallen Angels (The Horus Heresy #11)
“You fuss too much over making the "right" choice Gaius. All we need do is make a good choice, see it through, and accept the consequences.” 23 likes
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