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The Annotated Sense and Sensibility

4.06  ·  Rating details ·  794,171 Ratings  ·  12,033 Reviews
From the editor of the popular Annotated Pride and Prejudice comes an annotated edition of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility that makes this tale of two sisters in love an even more enjoyable read. Here is the complete text of the novel with more than 2,000 annotations on facing pages, including:
 
-Explanations of historical context
-Citations from Austen’s life, letters,
...more
Paperback, 742 pages
Published May 3rd 2011 by Anchor (first published October 30th 1811)
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kellyjane I think that Colonel Brandon was written as falling in love with Marianne almost as quickly and easily as he was smitten with her. Jane Austen doesn't…moreI think that Colonel Brandon was written as falling in love with Marianne almost as quickly and easily as he was smitten with her. Jane Austen doesn't really explain it (she never takes us inside the mind of Colonel Brandon); but apparently he sees qualities in Marianne (passion, loyalty, intelligence, exuberance) that he had been prone to admire through his adult life, beginning with Eliza. (That ventured, I don't think that Colonel Brandon was a particularly well-written character, truth be told.)

My sense of Marianne was that she was written as someone who undergoes a rather profound shift in her consciousness, outlook, and values as a result of almost bringing her own destruction upon herself. She accepted Elinor's ethos of 'emotional self-government' rather than impulsive emotional reactivity-- along with accepting more of Elinor's outlook on social proprieties and etc-- and therefore, it seems to me, was open to the more 'sensible' choice of marrying a mature and stable and decent man who would be devoted to her. It seemed to me that Jane Austen hinted something like that Marianne would come to love Colonel Brandon over time, because it was her nature 'never to do anything by halves'. It was more a respect and gratitude that would evolve into a feeling of love because of Marianne's strong sense of loyalty to whatever she could genuinely appreciate. All of her surrounding loved ones wanted the marriage to take place, and she acquiesced.

But for me personally, it wasn't a particularly satisfying arc of the story's drama. I can understand it; but I can't help feeling that Marianne sacrificed a part of herself in marrying for respect rather than organically passionate love.(less)

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Stephen
I love Jane Austen.
I LOVE Jane Austen.
I LOVE JANE AUSTEN!!
I…LOVE…JANE…AUSTEN!!
I……LOVE…..JANE..…AUSTEN!!

I still twitch a bit, but I'm getting more and more man-comfortable saying that because there no denying that it’s true. Normally, I am not much of a soapy, chick-flick, mani-pedi kinda guy. I don’t spritz my wine, rarely eat quiche and have never had anything waxed (though the list of things that need it grows by the hour).

But I would walk across a desert in bloomers and a parasol to read M
...more
Anni
Dec 22, 2008 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Here is this book in a nutshell:
Marianne and Elinor: 'O, why are we not married yet?'
Hot Guy #1: 'Let's get married.'
Elinor: 'Yes, let's.'
Hot Guy #1: 'Nah, forget it.'
Elinor: (pines)
Old Guy: 'Let's get married.'
Marianne: 'No, let's not.'
Hot Guy #2: 'Let's get married.'
Marianne: 'Yes, let's.'
Hot Guy #2: 'Nah, forget it.'
Marianne: (pines)
Hot Guy #1: 'Hey, let's get married.'
Elinor: 'Hark! Now I may stop pining!'
Marianne: 'This sucks. I am way hotter than her.'
Old Guy: 'Let's get married.'
Marianne:
...more
Bookdragon Sean
Money. It's all about the money. I mean, why else would you marry someone?

In Sense and Sensibility there are three major factors beyond the usual considerations of appearance, personality and character conduct when looking for a marriage in 19th century England. Indeed, what the Dashwood sisters look for- well Elinor really because she has more refined tastes and is far more discerning in regards to men- is a man’s opinion on literature and his understanding of natural beauty. What most people l
...more
Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
Jane Austen’s first published work, Sense and Sensibility, published in 1811, is more straightforward than most of her later works. The story focuses on two sisters, ages 17 and 19, and how their romantic interests and relationships epitomize their different approaches to life. The older sister Elinor embodies sense, good judgment and discretion.
description

Her sister Marianne is emotional and volatile, following her heart with a supreme disregard for what society might – and does – think.
description

Elinor is pretty m
...more
Carmen
Nov 06, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Fans of Classic Literature
RE-READ September 6, 2015

This is one of my all-time favorite books. I like it even more than I do Pride and Prejudice.

Everyone goes crazy over Lizzie Bennett and idolizes her, but my role model will always be Elinor Dashwood. She is a great sister, a trustworthy confidante, someone who always acts with honor and compassion. She is smart, fiscally responsible, stoic, and strong. I admire her so much and wish I could be more like her in real life.

I hate John Dashwood and want to punch him in the t
...more
Barry Pierce
Sense and Sensibility is dense with inactivity.
Henry Avila
Jul 24, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The story of two teenage girls with romantic troubles, caused by unreliable men (they have dark secrets, but who doesn't ? ), in 1790's England, calm Elinor Dashwood 19, and her younger sibling , by a couple of years, the emotional, Marianne, 17. When their father is no longer living, all the family, including the mother, Mrs. Dashwood and third sister, Margaret, 13, must vacate their mansion, in Sussex, Norland Park, a large estate, which many generations of the quiet, respectable Dashwoods, ha ...more
Maureen
Jul 15, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the third Jane Austen book I've read and it's by far my favorite. I love the story, love the heroines, love the MEN I just love everything about this. There was so much happening that it never felt slow or boring and the SUSPENSE and REVELATIONS at the end of the book were so fantastically done. AGH JUST SO GOOD.
TIME TO GO WATCH THE MOVIE.

Reread mid-Jan to early Feb 2016 for Austentatious

STILL MY FAVORITE
Ana
“The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”

Yes. So much yes.

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s.p
Sep 14, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to s.p by: Meredith
Shelves: classics, austen, love
'Know your own happiness. Want for nothing but patience -- or give it a more fascinating name: Call it hope.'

What does it mean for one to be 'sensible'? As we are all individuals, with our own needs, is it sensible to always act according to our countenance (to steal a lovely phrase from Austen), to keep true to ourselves, or is there a code of manners that we should adhere to in order to maintain a proper course of action? Austen’s aptly titled Sense and Sensibility, a staggeringly impressive f
...more
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1265
Jane Austen was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature, her realism and biting social commentary cementing her historical importance among scholars and critics.

Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentry
...more
More about Jane Austen...
“The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!” 7822 likes
“If I could but know his heart, everything would become easy.” 986 likes
More quotes…