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Archimedes and the Door of Science

3.8  ·  Rating details ·  1,690 Ratings  ·  61 Reviews
Jeanne Bendick, through text and pictures, admirably succeeds in bringing to life the ancient Greek mathematician who enriched mathematics and all branches of science. Against the backdrop of Archimedes's life and culture, the author discusses the man's work, his discoveries and the knowledge later based upon it. The simple, often humorous, illustrations and diagrams great ...more
Paperback, 142 pages
Published October 13th 2004 by Bethlehem Books (first published 1962)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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We love
May 29, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: a
My oldest enjoyed this and made science journal entries along with her readings.
Nathaniel
Mar 15, 2017 rated it it was amazing
i liked it
Sarah Ramey
Mar 14, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
AWESOME
Joe
Jan 28, 2010 rated it it was ok

The book Archimedes: The Door of Science by Jeanne Bendick was a rather colorless novel. It mostly contained information about Archimedes' life, lifestyle and inventions. I found it interesting that after telling of an invention or equation, it would explain the math and the science involved in said invention. It helped me to comprehend how what he learned applied to modern day science and math.
The book was separated into several sections, such as Gravity, Geometry, Machines. Each section woul
...more
Cheryl
Jul 21, 2008 rated it it was amazing
I have had an interest in buying this book for many years. It is recommended in virtually every reputable catalog. It just always seemed like when essential schoolbooks were purchased, it didn't make sense to purchase a book about just ONE person. Well, that was a gigantic mistake on my part. The accomplishments of Archimedes made him one of the most important founders of science. This captivating book tells the story of Archimedes life AND gives vivid imagery to his accomplishments through simp ...more
Annie Kate
Mar 12, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Once again I enjoyed this book hugely. Miss 13 read it for her homeschool studies of ancient Greece, and she found it boring, probably because of the many discussions of the significance of Archimedes. When I used to read it aloud, I would summarize or skip those and focus on the stories.

But I loved to read the science and math bits, and will ask Miss 15 to read it again with a focus on math and science history. Even though this book is technically at a grade 5 reading level, the content, well-u
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Jen
Aug 20, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Ok...so reviewing this book would be like reviewing Little House on the Praire! What more could I say that hasn't already been said?

Sarah read this several years ago and thought it was good. Mark read this last week and couldn't put it down!!!! I had to give up a half a bottle of rubbing alchohol so he could experiment with density of liquids. Mark was completely taken in by Archimedes! It's so enjoyable to see your son make the connection that Archimedes, Erastosthenes, and Aesop were contempo
...more
Elizabeth Gardner Johnson
This is a fantastic book to read with children or young adults. We take for granted so many mathematical discoveries and scientific successes of the past; yes, there continues to be an almost exponential amount of discovery today in fields such as astronomy and physics, but they are using Archimedes trigonometry and adding upon the knowledge base of earlier ages.

There are so many wonderful projects to do with your children (or by yourself!) presented in this book such as: drawing geometric shap
...more
A.K. Klemm
Jul 29, 2016 rated it it was amazing
I love these Living History Library books and Jeanne Benedick has a wonderful way of introducing great people in history and what they did/discovered on a child's level without truly "dumbing" anything down. These books should be a part of any child's library, and for sure any homeschoolers' library. My kid's eyes have been opened to so many ideas because of this book. At age 5, she's already been checking out levers and experimenting with density while playing in the bathtub, she showed me how ...more
Sally
Jul 21, 2008 rated it really liked it
This was really a fantastic overview of Archimedes' contributions to science and math. Easy to read and understand, quirky (in a good way) illustrations. Well-indexed. Highly recommended for kids and adults as an introduction to mechanics, geometry, hydrostatics and conics.

I'm reading another book about Archimedes, this one an historical fiction novel. The contrast between how Archimedes is portrayed as a personality is striking. It helped me realize we really don't know much about him at all; m
...more
Emmeline
Jul 07, 2016 rated it liked it
This was in my history curriculum one year, and I remember wondering WHY. It is a good book, there is no doubt about that. It is reasonably well written, there is no doubt about that.

But my problem is that I was given it to read for the purpose of learning from it. Now, I already knew everything in this book, and it was written to the audience of primary school children.

So I got a tad frustrated at this book. But even so, it is well written and presents the facts in a story telling way that keep
...more
Janice
Apr 12, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: kid-non-fiction
Archimedes opened doors for studies in math and science, and this book can open those same doors in your child's mind (or your students' minds).

Bendick writes about Archimedes, his life, and various chapters are dedicated to ideas he had and inventions he made. Each of these chapters are good openers for various studies in your classroom (or at home).

The amazing thing was that so much of what he learned and discovered had to be rediscovered many years later because his teachings and writings ha
...more
Emma Filbrun
Jul 25, 2015 rated it it was amazing
My daughter read Archimedes and the Door of Science several years ago for school, and remembers being thoroughly bored with it. I warned her not to tell her brothers that, however, when I started reading it to them this week to go along with our study of Ancient History. They found parts of it quite interesting, and I found a lot of it fascinating.

Did you know that an oar is a machine? It is a lever, and all levers are a form of machine! In fact...

Read my full review here.

Bryony
Mar 25, 2010 rated it really liked it
I found this book very interesting. It's amazing to think about the things we take for granted today -- things that ancient mathematicians and scientists figured out and had to prove. It's amazing what they could do through observation, experiments, and geometry. For example, in 300 BC, they had already figured out the Earth's circumference, give or take 100 miles. Wow. I like how the book goes through HOW Archimedes thought and figured things out, instead of just telling us he did it. What a gr ...more
Sara
Jul 03, 2013 rated it really liked it
Excellent homeschool (and all who love learning) book! Jeanne Bendick brings Archimedes and his many achievements to life. The text doesn't always just grab you, but there is a genuine enthusiasm for how Archimedes used his gifts to make a lasting impact in the world. Readable for young folks, with enough detail and academic content for the rest of us. Bet you didn't know that it was Archimedes who used mathematical reasoning to prove that numbers are infinite. Or that he invented a machine usin ...more
Betsy
4.5 stars really

Excellent introduction to Archimedes, the history of the time period, and the many scientific inventions/discoveries/theories of this man. Even for kids who don't have a physics background, the explanations and illustrations are fairly easy to follow. But for kids who are already interested in physical science concepts, this will be an especially interesting biography. Easy enough to read aloud (provided you can pronounce Greek names), but the drawings will necessitate a small au
...more
Wendee
I picked up this book again and began reading it aloud to Brigham. It kept his interest, and now the younger children are listening in. Lisa even hollered from the next room, "I'm still listening," when I noticed no one was in the room I was reading in anymore. I guess I'll continue... they want more. =)

This one is a keeper. Not only does it teach about Archimedes and his science and math discoveries, but it also tells of the history of Ancient Greece and what good thinkers they were. I am enjo
...more
Dulci
Feb 28, 2013 rated it it was ok
Shelves: non-fiction
This was a good book, not exactly one that I couldn't put down, but good for the purpose for which it was written. It is part biography, part science, part history. Admittedly, it is incredible to think of all the things that people of that time period didn't know that we take for granted in modern times. So perhaps that's the best part of this book-- to realize how much we owe the gifted and inquisitive people of long ago, like Archimedes.
Jo Oehrlein
This is an interesting book about Archimedes, but in some areas it provides so much detail that you wonder which part is actually known and which is just being fleshed out with guesses and other knowledge about that time period. It’s written “down” a bit – probably to younger elementary, although it’s not a picture book. It does provide some fascinating information on the works of Archimedes.
Harmony
May 21, 2008 rated it really liked it
SO I read this when I was in 4th grade and I completely loved it!! The pictures were awesome and the explanations of Archimedes' science contributions were really easy to understand. I think I mostly liked it because I learned so much from it. Plus it made me feel like a complete nerd. Great book!
Jill
Mar 29, 2008 rated it liked it
great introduction to archimedes! the publishers have indicated a fifth grade audience, but my math is so poor i enjoyed much of it, and will use it when my daughter goes back through ancient classics in fifth grade. lots of simple pictures, fun facts, and great storytelling to flesh out facts of his life.
Mia Silva
Jan 03, 2015 rated it really liked it
Being a person who loves science, I figured I'd like the book - but it turned out even better than I expected!The book is designed as a fun way to learn science-y facts with a few problems you can solve on your own.

A few stories are intertwined into the story to provide a fun learning experience. A would-recommend for any science fans!
Hannah
Jul 26, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-for-school
This was interesting, it was full of facts. The way it was written was more like a narrative than a textbook, which I enjoyed. Since I love learning, this was a great new way to absorb new information. A few sections bored me, but overall it was a pleasant read.

Review by: http://lachatblanc.wordpress.com/
Carson
Feb 04, 2014 rated it liked it
I originally thought that this book was going to be some sort of biography about the life of Archimedes. But in fact, it was more about the mathematical principals he discovered. It talks about simple machines,geometry,and a few other things he discovered. A fairly interesting book that I would recommend to anyone who likes science and math.
Hailey Bug
Nov 06, 2013 rated it really liked it
I liked this book as a part of my science. It was very interesting and easy to read. I was supposed to read it slowly and in potions, but I wanted to keep reading that's how good it was. There were not any fun pictures which was a bummer, but it was still good. I would recommend this book I you are into science.
Amy
William read this as part of his science curric. in CTG. i read some but not all. it is written in such a way for anyone to understand how Archimedes came up with basic scientific principles that we take for granted. the illustrations are helpful also.
Kacie
Oct 21, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Fantastic book! Part biography of Archimedes, it includes ancient Greek history and culture, a little bit of geography, and a lot of science and math. Some of the math was too technical for my almost 7-year-old, but overall we both really enjoyed this one. I need to get a copy for my shelves.
Alysia
We just started reading this book aloud in homeschool and I love it! Not just a history book, it gives us things to discuss and try ourselves, and is so fun. I love books that inspire you to go and experiment and create! My budding scientists are enjoying this, as am I.
Jenn
Sep 08, 2009 rated it it was amazing
My 5-year-old daughter and (especially) 9-year-old son are eating this up. Great introduction to dozens of scientific and mathematical principles, in biographical/historical context. Drawings, diagrams, and experiments to try as you read. I wish there were more books like this!
Celeste Batchelor
I found this book to be a great addition to our math and science education. It gave insightful short stories and drawings of the many simple machines and mathematical findings of Archimedes. We found it very enjoyable!
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Jeanne Bendick was born February 25, 1919, in New York City. When she was growing up, her grandfather taught her how to draw. He always took her to the American Museum of Natural History in New York to see the different kinds of art.

In her books, Jeanne Bendick likes to make her drawings very simple. In many of her books, she helps her readers see how science is a part of everyday life. With her w
...more
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