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The Medici Effect, With a New Preface and Discussion Guide: What Elephants and Epidemics Can Teach Us About Innovation
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The Medici Effect, With a New Preface and Discussion Guide: What Elephants and Epidemics Can Teach Us About Innovation

3.94  ·  Rating details ·  1,760 ratings  ·  144 reviews

Why do so many world-changing insights come from people with little or no related experience? Charles Darwin was a geologist when he proposed the theory of evolution. And it was an astronomer who finally explained what happened to the dinosaurs.

Frans Johansson's The Medici Effect shows how breakthrough ideas most often occur when we bring concepts from one field into a

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Kindle Edition, 256 pages
Published February 14th 2017 by Harvard Business Review Press (first published September 2004)
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Average rating 3.94  · 
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 ·  1,760 ratings  ·  144 reviews


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Start your review of The Medici Effect, With a New Preface and Discussion Guide: What Elephants and Epidemics Can Teach Us About Innovation
Kelly Reid
Feb 19, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
My disjointed notes from 2 and a half read-throughs.

17: Dawkins - Ideas are genetic. They propagate in the same way.

21: Seemingly unrelated concepts can almost always be combined in unexpected and potentially useful ways. Specialization has led to fragmentation of knowledge but the trend is reversing.

24: Cultural arbitrage an interesting source of inspiration.

26: We know enough about how the world works to transition from "how and why" to "X+Y".\

28: Financial systems run on similar algorithms as
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Andrew Hiller
Feb 22, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
One day as my friend and fellow author Henry Sienkiewicz were talking current events, philosophy, and how ideas rub against each other to form knew thoughts, he made a dash to his bookshelf and pulled out this book called the Medici Effect. He thought it would be an interesting fit. He was right.

The Medici effect is about how to spur creativity and innovation. It looks at everyone from the inventor of the card game Magic to the people who developed GPS. Its major premise is that ideas from
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Aaron Edwards
Aug 25, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Sometimes we look for justification to continue to gather knowledge, especially when we are taxed already with what is on our plates...this book reminds us why it is worth it. I very much enjoyed it.
Marissa
It was mandatory for me to read this book for a class and a mandatory read is never as good as a read by choice but I was sorely disappointed by this book. Included below is a review I wrote for the class about this book.

Frans Johansson’s The Medici Effect attempts to identify the nature of innovation and advise readers on how to innovate. Though I found many faults with this book, I will not argue that this book is not interesting and valuable, because it is both. Johansson attempts to
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marc Gottesman
In the middle of reading this, but 20 pages in and I get it already. Do I finish the book?

I get the point. But the writing is pretty uninteresting.
Stacey Slager
May 19, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A quick read, pretty accessible. I've seen a lot of the content before in other work.

It gave me lots to think about for sure, especially since I feel like I've been "intersectional" my whole life (I've worked in commercial fishing, public libraries, fast food, a yarn shop, a live music night club, a hospital, and now doing healthcare IT)(and I have lived in four countries).
Jeremy Diederich
I can't believe this book only gets 3.5 stars. I will write more later but this truly astonishes me. This is a fascinating book.
Yiwen
May 10, 2017 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: gave-up
Read the first chapter and you will get the gist of the whole book. I appreciate the author's effort to put together all those inspirational stories. However topics like this usually don't age very well.

Scott Schang
Mar 14, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book opened my eyes to innovation through the intersection of ideas and concepts from outside my specific area of expertise. Understanding that true innovation does not come from what is already known, but from what cannot be known, was something that really made an impact on me. After reading this book, I was compelled to begin looking at the perceived challenges in my own business through from a different perspective. I jumped into other industries and areas that I previously did not ...more
Captain Nemo
Mar 31, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
one of the most interesting books I've read in a long time. In this book, Frans is digging into the world of the intersection and how to look for it. A must read for dreamers, lost people, random people, innovators, doers and others that feel that way :)
Zalina
May 30, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: didn-t-finish
Very boring book.
Susan Reed
Mar 26, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
Excellent book. Great stories to back up new theory on creativity. Too bad the author limits himself to work and business ideas instead of a life philosophy.
Ash
Aug 10, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book is about Peter's Cafe. It is a must read - incredibly enlightening and inspiring.

p. 2: Peter's Cafe is a nexus point in the world, one of the most extreme I have ever seen. There is another place just like Peter's Cafe, but it is not in the Azores. It is in our minds. It is a place where different cultures, domains, and disciplines stream together toward a single point. They connect, allowing for established concepts to clash and combine, ultimately forming a multitude of new,
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Lídia
Aug 01, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: leinn
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Lídia
Aug 01, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: leinn
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Lídia
Aug 01, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: leinn
SUMMARY
The book bases on how to create innovation through the asociation of diferent fields. Frans Johansson named the book after a banking family from Florence, Italy who funded creators in the fifteenth-century that had a remarkable brust of creativity when they found each other in the Tuscane city and there they learned frome one another braking barrirers between disciplines and cultures.
The Interection is where different fields meet. Fields are made of concepts, words with sustainable
...more
Lídia
Aug 01, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: leinn
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Lídia
Aug 01, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: leinn
SUMMARY
The book bases on how to create innovation through the asociation of diferent fields. Frans Johansson named the book after a banking family from Florence, Italy who funded creators in the fifteenth-century that had a remarkable brust of creativity when they found each other in the Tuscane city and there they learned frome one another braking barrirers between disciplines and cultures.
The Interection is where different fields meet. Fields are made of concepts, words with sustainable
...more
David Gamble
What I wanted from this book was an examination of how the Medici created the Medici effect (which is a way of thinking in an intersectional way), the mistakes they made and what impacts this had on history (because studying history is some of my best learning). None of that material is in the book. In fact, the phrase "Medici effect" is hardly used. Instead, the book talks about intersectional ideas, where they come from, how people come up with them, why they're important (even necessary ...more
Priyanka -
The concept of 'The Intersection' isn't new anymore.
A lot of concepts in this book have been talked about in books by Daniel Kahneman,Malcolm Gladwell and Daniel Ariely.The writing is very simple and the success stories do drive home the point on how to get into the intersection in order to be innovative.I think the author did not inspect much equally on examples which did not work out in the intersection.That would have provided a two way picture for readers.
Nevertheless,it's definitely worth
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Mark Isaak
Mar 17, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a fairly short book about simple (but not necessarily easy) measures by which to improve innovation. It relies more on anecdote than on academic research, and some of the research it reports is weak and/or poorly referenced. In particular, one reference that I wanted to look up was merely a broken URL, with no title or author to search in case the page had moved. But some research is there, and it does not appear to conflict with the anecdote.
Mick Scheinin
Nov 11, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good book about simple yet powerful idea at the heart of innovation and creativity. No wonder this idea keeps being reinvented.. Short book that could've been shorter; recommend skimming parts that seem familiar.. Mostly good practical examples; a pseudoscientific woo merchant like Deepak Chopra, however, should only be used as a negative example. But that is a minor issue.
Evan
Aug 27, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Motivational yet simple. Basically a series of examples, challenges, and successes on how true innovation waits for us at the intersection of two diametric cultures. This author is young, exciting, and wanting the world to truly make another turn on innovation. 200-level for my entrepreneurs out there.
Michael Farris
The book presents a number of thought provoking thoughts and methods to spur innovative thinking, but ultimately the impact of the book is weaken by repetitive and rambling nature of chapters. Ultimately, the book is worth the read, but most will find themselves skimming over 50+ pages.
I
Dec 05, 2017 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Ten pages in you get the gist of it. The blurbs at the end tell you that Harvard Press, Harvard professors and CEOs are in the scam of getting you to buy a book containing a message which could’ve been conveyed in 10 pages.
DaJuan Lucas
Aug 21, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great overall book! Truly challenges the reader to change his or her perception of innovation. The Medici Effect provides fresh examples of individuals who challenged the status quo and examine ways to find parallels between vastly different industries and backgrounds. Great Book!
Junha Sim
Very intersting, but the author hits the same points over and over again. You could turn this into a pamphlet and miss nothing.
Mason Mohkami
Talks about the importance of the intersection of industries and provides practical guides as how to approach and achieve it.

I could resonate with the every chapter.
Muturi Njeri
Aug 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Brilliant.
GSkillz
Jan 04, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: jan-2020
Condition your brain for innovation. Excellent information.
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