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Steppenwolf

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4.12  ·  Rating details ·  120,752 ratings  ·  4,069 reviews
Steppenwolf is a poetical self-portrait of a man who felt himself to be half-human and half-wolf. This Faust-like and magical story is evidence of Hesse's searching philosophy and extraordinary sense of humanity as he tells of the humanization of a middle-aged misanthrope. Yet his novel can also be seen as a plea for rigorous self-examination and an indictment of the intellectual hyp ...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published 1999 by Penguin (first published 1927)
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Peter
This answer contains spoilers… (view spoiler)
Bambiaddie Hi! I just finished the book and my level of german is approximately B2, a better B2 I'd say. What I found was that it varied, some parts were…moreHi! I just finished the book and my level of german is approximately B2, a better B2 I'd say. What I found was that it varied, some parts were relatively easy to read and some were harder, but it is most definitely doable. Naturally you're going to need a dictionary, there were so many words I did not know but hey, it's all about learning. Still I wouldn't say that this is the easiest book to start with, throughout my reading of the book I had a peek at the version of the book written in my mother tongue (Czech) several times and found the language to be advanced even there, so that definitely says something. Maybe a more modern book would be easier to begin with too in terms of language but give this one a try for sure! :) (less)
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Rajat Ubhaykar
Mar 17, 2011 rated it it was amazing
I read this book on a twenty four hour train journey surrounded by the bourgeois. It was a terrifying experience. The book didn't change my life and was not meant to, but it gave me hope and hope is always a good thing.

The influence of Indian spirituality on this book is apparent, but Hesse chooses to dissect it using the prism of Western pessimism. He talks about the multiplicity of the self and the infinite potential associated with it, how we often choose to attach fanciful restrictions to
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Sean Barrs the Bookdragon
Hermann Hesse’s words are timeless. Here they represent an entire disaffected generation, a generation who is on the cusp of radical change but still partly exists in the old world. They are out of space and out of time: they are lost within themselves. However, such things can aptly be applied to a number of individuals across the ages. And, for me, this is what made the novel so great.

Through these pages Hesse evokes a character I have seen many times before across literature, but never befor
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Lyn
Jul 31, 2011 rated it really liked it
Kurt Vonnegut, one of my literary heroes, said of Hermann Hesse’s novel Steppenwolf that is was “the most profound book about homesickness ever written”. Vonnegut also went on to describe how Hesse speaks to young readers, how he speaks to the essence of youth and offers hope.

Like many readers, I first encountered Hesse as a young person, for me it was when I was in high school. Hesse’s illustration of isolation and being misunderstood spoke to me as a youth, as I imagine it has for many young people.

Hesse said, “Of
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Paquita Maria Sanchez
This novel:

1. Initially reminded me very much of my own mental imbalances.

2. Started to make me feel like I'd been had, and that it was, in fact, just pretentious, overly self-aware "me me me" wackoff shite.

3. Redeemed itself (AND THE NARRATOR!) in the end with its exploration of drug-induced Jungian dreamscapes and subconscious mental states.

4. Successfully summoned that strange emotion that I like to call "happysad."

5. Did not change my life for
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Ahmad Sharabiani
684. Der Steppenwolf = Steppenwolf, Herman Hesse
Originally published in Germany in 1927, it was first translated into English in 1929. Combining autobiographical and psychoanalytic elements, the novel was named after the German name for the steppe wolf. The story in large part reflects a profound crisis in Hesse's spiritual world during the 1920's while memorably portraying the protagonist's split between his humanity and his wolf-like aggression and homelessness.

عنوانها: گرگ ب
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Glenn Russell
Mar 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: favorite-books



Many literary novels are page-turners, filled with a compelling, straightforward storyline and lots of action; think of Our Mutual Friend and Crime and Punishment, think of Heart of Darkness and No Country for Old Men, or novels like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo or The Spy Who Came in from the Cold.

Hermann Hesse's novel Steppenwolf is a work of a completely different cast; a reader might find the story gripping, even riveting, but for much different reasons, for the action takes place not in a major city or obscure outpost but primarily in t
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Darwin8u
Sep 16, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“There are always a few such people who demand the utmost of life and yet cannot come to terms with its stupidity and crudeness.”
― Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf

description

There is this bourgeoisie period in every man's life. A midpoint between birth and death where man is trapped alone. Unable to exist in the hot or cold of the absolutes he tries to find his way between the extremes in the comfortable center. Fearing life and death, he just |exists| ... barely. This is not a novel for the young. Just like it is better
...more
Agir(آگِر)
Sep 27, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
آنچه برای شخص من جنبه لذت اشراق و تعالی دارد چیزی است که مردم دنیا حداکثر آنرا در عالم ادبیات می جویند و دوست دارند، ولی درصحنه زندگی آنرا چیزی دیوانه وار تلقی می کنند

description

و در واقع اگر حق با دنیا باشد، اگر حق با این موسیقی کافه ای، با این کِیف های دسته جمعی، با این مردم آمریکائی مآب کم ادعای قانع زود خرسند باشد، پس من دیوانه هست
...more
Lisa
Rereading is tricky business!

And if the author's name is Hermann Hesse, rereading is a hit or miss experience, all depending on whether you happen to be in that time-space-continuum where Hesse makes sense or not. I devoured his works in my twenties, only to drop them like hot potatoes in my thirties, anachronistically blaming Hesse for being out of touch with the modern perception of the world as I knew it right then. So, now in my early forties, I seem to have swung back on that et
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Jenn(ifer)
Um. What the? What?

What the hell did I just read?

First third, BRILLIANT -- one of the most interesting bits of philosophical fiction I've ever read. Seriously. I was completely enthralled. Second third -- hard to believe that two people would ever actually have conversations such as these, but still engaging. Third third -- what the F*CK? No, really, what the f*ck? It was some sort of crazy funhouse reality blurring, whacked out Kubrick film. I don't know if I liked it or I hated it. My
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J.L.   Sutton
May 28, 2018 rated it really liked it
Having read several other novels by Hesse (Siddharta, Demian, Narcissus & Goldmund and Knulp), the theme of a protagonist intellectually or culturally isolated from the rest of society is familiar. However, in Steppenwolf, the depths of our protagonist’s (Harry’s) despair separates him from other of Hesse’s protagonists and from humanity. His life isn’t confirmed as valid or authentic. Harry doesn’t see himself as fully human. Instead, he sees himself as half-human and half-wolf (Steppenwolf ...more
sologdin
Likely the dumbest Important Book that I've read.

Yeah, it's cool that the narrator thinks he's a werewolf, but is really just a recluse pseudo-academic--and then reads a manuscript that describes fake werewolves and outs them as poseurs.

Cool, also, that the preface, by the manuscript's fictional finder and publisher, records the impression that the horrors of the middle ages were non-existent: "A man of the Middle Ages would detest the whole mode of our present day life as something
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Nikos Tsentemeidis
Συγκλονιστικό έργο. Βαθιά φιλοσοφικό και ψυχολογικό. Σε πολλά του σημεία είδα τον εαυτό μου. Δεν ξέρω γιατί αλλά μου θύμισε πολύ έντονα την πρώτη φορά που διάβασα Καμύ και συγκεκριμένα την πτώση.

Δεν έχω να γράψω κάτι, παρά να σας παραπέμψω στην κριτική της Ειρήνης που τα είπε εξαιρετικά, και εξαιτίας της διάβασα αυτό το βιβλίο και την ευχαριστώ

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
Ian "Marvin" Graye
Half Bourgeois/Half Wolf

"Steppenwolf" starts with a fascinating 20 page preface that places a more conventional perspective on the rest of the novel (which is quite radical, if not exactly nihilist).

The unnamed first person narrator could be one of us. He purports to be "a middle class man, living a regular life, fond of work and punctuality, [as well as] an abstainer and non-smoker."

He gets to know the Steppenwolf, Harry Haller, while they both rent furnished rooms in his aunt's apartment.

He finds Harry and his behaviour foreign, alien, peculiar andWolf
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Steven Godin
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Perry
The Best Novel on the Intellectual Male's Midlife Crisis

I might well have ridiculed this novel at 20, when I was unconquerable, infinite, the world my oyster. Thirty years on, having been through the process of disenchantment called life, and survived the tragic ends (de facto and de jure) of each chapter of my personal myth--the perfect job, a huge house, insane wealth, and adoration of both my looks and smarts--I find this novel profound.

Hermann Hesse wrote this in his late 40s
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Dan Schwent
Harry Haller fights a battle ever day against his animalistic nature, the Steppenwolf, the thing keeping him from fitting in with society. Will he conquer the Steppenwolf before it drives him to suicide?

I'd toyed with the idea of paraphrasing the opening of the 1970's Incredible Hulk TV show but it felt disrespectful to a book of this power. Steppenwolf is one of the more thought-provoking books I've ever read. I lost count of the number of times I stopped and pondered my own Steppen
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Jan-Maat
Goodness what a delightfully interior novel this is, I had quite forgotten or more possibly never noticed. It was some years ago when I last read it, rather as Mark Twain allegedly said of his father, I find it much improved in the interim.

Before I reread The Glass Bead Game I was weighing up which to return to first. I think this was the better way round at least for me, I had a feeling that Harry was in want of Castalia, or that the Castalian life was developed to avoid the development
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هَنَـــاءْ

يتكرر الأمر بجنائزية مرعبة.
ندفن شيئاً، نطمر أشياء.
نقف مكتوفي الأيدي حيال الكثير.
ولا نفقد الجاذبية التي تُجَمّع ذرّاتنا إلا في السر،
حيث نثق أن لا أحد.




ستبنوولف
القيوط
ذئب البراري
ذئب السهول
رواية أو سيرة ذاتية .. أقرب ما تكون لقلب هيسه فقد لمحت ذلك وهو يصف الصور التي علّقها ذلك الغريب على حائطه. لا أدري كيف شعرت بأن هذا الحائط الذي يصفه هيرمان هو حائطه الشخصي والصور حقاً صوره التي يراها بأم عينهclass="gr-hostedUserImg">
ذئب
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Algernon (Darth Anyan)

A stray wolf of the steppes, now part of the herd of city-dwellers – there could be no more compelling way of picturing him, his wary isolation, his wildness, his restlessness, his homelessness and his yearning for home.

Herr Harry Haller has transcended his own timeframe and cultural space to become an universal symbol of the misunderstood intellectual, of the sensitive mind cast adrift on an ocean of mediocrity, of the voice of reason drowned by the howls of the dogs of war. Like Holden Caulf
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Nickolas the Kid
Ο Αριστοτέλης έλεγε πως για να ζήσει κανείς μόνος του πρέπει να είναι ή θηρίο ή θεός. Η μοναξιά είναι ανεξαρτησία σύμφωνα με τον Έσσε αλλά ας μην ξεχνάμε και τον Φρόυντ ο οποίος πίστευε ο πολιτισμός είναι η πηγή της δυστυχίας για τους ανθρώπους....

Ο Έσσε λοιπόν μας δίνει ένα ψυχογραφικό μυθιστόρημα το οποίο εμβαθύνει στα πιο σκοτεινά μονοπάτια της ανθρώπινης ψυχής. Ο Χάρυ δεν είναι θεός... Είναι ένας άνθρωπος ο οποίος προτιμά την μοναξιά και την ασφάλεια του σπιτιού του. Είναι όμως π
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David Schaafsma
for madmen only

In league with Pessoa’s Book of Disquiet and Dostoevsky’s Raskolnikov, Hermann Hesse’s Steppenwolf is about a suicidal guy who never actually commits suicide, a tortured soul who struggles with the dualism of his nature, from the human to the wolf, from the classical to the romantic, to the spiritual to the sinful, from the life of the mind to the life of the body. I read this three times when I was 18-20, trying to understand it, trying to find elements that would hel
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Florencia
Solitude is independence. It had been my wish and with the years I had attained it. It was cold. Oh, cold enough! But it was also still, wonderfully still and vast like the cold stillness of space in which the stars revolve.

I wrote a review a couple of weeks ago and I am still not sure about sharing it. It is too personal. This book is so close to my heart and my first review reflects that; a little too much. I mean, I didn't know what to expect and it blew me away. It is a fascinating work about near
...more
فايز غازي Fayez Ghazi
- "ذئب البراري"، عنوان قد يوحي للقارئ بمغامرات وأحداث شتّى سيقبل عليها، لكن لا فهذه الرواية لعبة ذهنية بإمتياز بدايتها ونهايتها في عقل شخص واحد تتقارع فيه روحان (سأعود لذلك لاحقاً)، واحدة آنسة لطيفة واخرى همجية ذئبية، يبقى المقياس هو نسبة نجاح الكاتب في تسطير افكاره على الورق!

- بمكن تقسيم القصة الى ثلاثة اجزاء، القسم الأول يقدّم هاري هاللر بعيون ابن اخ صاحبة البناية التي استأجر غرفتين فيها، يقوم هذا القسم برسم الإطار الخارجي لهاري: الوصف الجسدي، طريقة حياته، وحدته، فوضوية غرفة معيشته
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Kirstie
Dec 25, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: people interested in the complexity of life
I've read a few of Hesse's novels and I keep coming back to Steppenwolf time and time again. It's not as if books like Demian and Beneath the Wheel aren't worthwhile, either. It's just that there is something so grabbing and memorable about Steppenwolf. I was truly changed after I read this and I can't really say that for the majority of the books I've read.

One thing I think Hesse was obsessed with a little is the duality of life-the light and the dark side. Steppenwolf takes you to
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Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a 15-hour blaze and...30-minutes wait to call the firemen...and
Personality should be integral, some psychoanalysts suggest.



Here we have an old, solitary and independent man ruminating upon his self, or his selves; a part human, and another one wolf-like.


Is he alienated? Is it a midlife crisis? An existential one? Do those parts cooperate with each other? Or, are they set apart, conflicting?


He just had a normal, gently-killing-time day. This is how the book introduces us to this character. One hot bath, some breathing exercises, some meditation,…old-books readin
...more
David H
Jul 28, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
گفته بودم برای ریویو نوشتن به چند روز زمان نیاز دارم چون وقتی تموم شد خیلی فکر و روحم رو درگیر و خسته کرده بود، هیچی نمیتونستم در موردش بگم، ولی حالا اینجوری شروع میکنم:
گرگ بیابان اثر هرمان هسه (بهترین کتاب سال ۹۸ تا اینجا)
نوروز ۹۸ وقتی آنا کارنینا رو شروع کردم به خودم گفتم این بهترین کتابیه که امسال میخونم و همینطور هم شد، آنا کارنینا، شاهکار تولستوی بزرگ، از همه نظر تا الان بهترین رمانی هست که امسال خوندم، ولی،،، اینجا یه ولی بزرگ هست، ولی وقتی به موضوع مورد بحث میرسیم، هرمان هسه د
...more
Andrei Tamaş
Recomand acest roman tuturor celor care vor să descopere infernul dinlăuntrul lor.
Mi-am propus de foarte multe ori să scriu o recenzie asupra romanului "Lupul de stepă" de Hesse. Mă obseda însă ideea că nu aș fi capabil, că nu aș putea spune tot ce aș vrea să spun, că n-aș găsi cuvintele necesare pentru a descrie această carte. Ieșind din aura ei și scriind DESPRE ea, mi-e frică de faptul că o să-i ciopârțesc valoarea (nu sunt deloc un bun sculptor).
Poate cuvintele mele de mai sus nu înse
...more
peiman-mir5 rezakhani
دوستانِ گرانقدر، بدونِ تردید خواندنِ این کتاب میتواند کاری با ذهنِ شما انجام دهد که ساعت ها بر روی جملات و موضوع داستان و حتی استعاره های به کار رفته بیاندیشید... <هرمان هسه> با خلاقیت و هنرمندی بسیار زیاد، این داستان را به نوعی نوشته است که شما نمی دانید آیا عناصر و شخصیت های داستان، خیالی هستند و یا واقعی.. آیا هسه آنها را ساخته است و یا شخصیتِ اصلی داستان آنها را در نوشته ها و خاطراتش جای داده است.... درکل کتابی چالش برانگیز است که جملات فلسفی و موضوعاتی روانشناسانه در دلِ خود جای داده ...more
Peter McEllhenney
Apr 03, 2009 rated it it was ok
Now that I’ve reached middle age, I thought it was time to revisit that classic of earnest adolescent angst (despite the fact the novel’s hero is nearly 50 years old), Hermann Hesse’ Steppenwolf.

I found the early sections of the book dull, flat, pretentious, and swimming in its own vanity. But the later sections corrected some of these faults, and made the book interesting and worth reading overall.

My main problem with the early parts of Steppenwolf is that the novel is constantly tells us how fin
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Hermann Hesse was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize for Literature. His best known works include Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game (also known as Magister Ludi) which explore an individual's search for spirituality outside society.

In his time, Hesse was a popular and influential author in the German-speaking world; worldwide fame only came later. Hesse's f
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“Solitude is independence. It had been my wish and with the years I had attained it. It was cold. Oh, cold enough! But it was also still, wonderfully still and vast like the cold stillness of space in which the stars revolve.” 787 likes
“You are willing to die, you coward, but not to live.” 705 likes
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