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Kiteworld

3.56  ·  Rating details ·  105 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
A panoramic novel of men and machines, Kiteworld presents a future world in which sturdy, highly trained crews launch daring pilots into the stratosphere, borne aloft on giant Cody manlifter kites to watch the horizon and the skies for demonic monsters strikingly suggestive of guided missiles and aircraft. Intense, detailed, and meticulously observed, the world of the nove ...more
Hardcover, 256 pages
Published 1985 by Gollancz
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Kay
Jul 28, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: alternative future lovers
This is one of those weirdly indescribable books. 'Read it' is really all I can say. People either rave about this man's work or hate him, and I'm a big fan; his view is hallucinogenically strange, but highly realistic - he's the real father of steampunk, whose alternative future in Pavane (where Britain remains in pre-industrial social and economic stages, but with a highly structured religious framework) is a glory to experience.

Kiteworld though, is a world where blue demons strike from on hi
...more
Steve Field
Dec 02, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Many people cite 'Pavane' as Roberts' best work, but for me it's 'Kiteworld'. This is a post-nuclear catastrophe world where the safety measures and precautions used to guard against contamination have been ritualised and absorbed into the prevailing religion, to the extent that the original reasons have long been forgotten.

The world slowly emerges story by story, each one taken from the viewpoint of one of the inhabitants, all of whom have a connection to the military kite force, a dedicated b
...more
Peter Tillman
Sep 15, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: sf-fantasy
A-, offbeat English social fantasy. 3.5 stars, I'd guess. Read in 2001.
Rick
Jan 15, 2013 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy
Keith Robert’s “Kiteworld” was an interesting read … odd, but interesting. Apparently set in a post-apocalyptic world, the residents are protected by an organized military corps of Kiteflyers who patrol the skies and protect the land from flying demons, mostly coming from the Badlands or the border areas. There are also ground troops that protect citizens from demons that crawl. We never actually see a demon but we are made to be vaguely afraid of them. In the background, two competing religions ...more
Jen
Mar 31, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2014-challenge
I picked up this audiobook based solely on the fact that Gideon Emery was narrating it, because I have a bit of a voice-crush on him. The book was actually better than I expected: part steampunk, part sci-fi, it's the story of a world (that seems to be not Earth) long years after some kind of disaster made most of the land uninhabitable by the "Folk" of the main realm and instead inhabited by "demons" (the general consensus of reviewers seems to be that it was a nuclear war and the demons are si ...more
Insouciantly
This is less a novel and more like a sequential series of short stories that lead to a powerful climax. In this world, the church is powerful, and has lead the populace to believe in the danger of demons who are trying to invade their society. The way to protect yourself from the demons is flying kites in the sky with powerful symbology. Then there are the kitemen, they fly the skies in giant kites and protect the borders of the realm. The kitemen are the heroes of the realm, and they touch so m ...more
Ari
Jun 30, 2013 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Thoroughly unsatisfying; the deus ex machina ending made me wonder if Mr. Roberts got a ways in, stood, threw up his hands, and exclaimed, "screw it, let's just go to press".

The world is engaging enough, if a little confusing. Keeping track of the non-linear storytelling was difficult, and the first segment told in first-person POV was incongruous with the third-person remainder.

If you must read it, I highly recommend the audiobook version, which is narrated by the superb narrator Gideon Emery.
Doris Pearson
May 14, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It was OK, had a problem with it holding my interest.
Eija
Koostuu useasta lyhyemmästä elämäntarinasta, jotka nivotaan myöhemmässä vaiheessa yhteen. Miljöö on karu ja julmakin. Pidin kerronnasta.
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Used These Alternate Names: Alistair Bevan , John Kingston , David Stringer

Keith John Kingston Roberts was a British science fiction author. He began publishing with two stories in the September 1964 issue of Science Fantasy magazine, "Anita" (the first of a series of stories featuring a teenage modern witch and her eccentric granny) and "Escapism.

Several of his early stories were written using t
...more
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