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Spring Snow (The Sea of Fertility #1)

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4.15  ·  Rating details ·  7,911 Ratings  ·  550 Reviews
Tokyo, 1912. The closed world of the ancient aristocracy is being breached for the first time by outsiders - rich provincial families, a new and powerful political and social elite.

Kiyoaki has been raised among the elegant Ayakura family - members of the waning aristocracy - but he is not one of them. Coming of age, he is caught up in the tensions between old and new, and
...more
Paperback, 376 pages
Published July 1975 by Pocket Books (first published 1968)
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Morgan I'm currently reading this book and I would say read his short stories first. Maybe try to find "Patriotism" since that's the first one I started.…moreI'm currently reading this book and I would say read his short stories first. Maybe try to find "Patriotism" since that's the first one I started. He's an amazing writer, but heavy. I haven't read Murakami yet, so I can't tell you about that. The author I'd compare Mishima the most with in an odd way is an extreme male version of Virginia Woolf. Two writers who couldn't seem fit in and decided to take there own life. However, Mishima is more violent, but in a beautiful poetic kind of way.(less)
Tijl Vandersteene I don't think he's dumb. He's not interested or motivated, but that's something else. Because his social background he can afford to be lazy in…moreI don't think he's dumb. He's not interested or motivated, but that's something else. Because his social background he can afford to be lazy in school, he will have a good life anyway. This leaves him time to dream and fool around and be romantic, too romantic. I think this is an important line of thought, an important issue in the story of Kiyoaki. He has an unrealistic view on life and love, which causes a lot of the problems. He struggles with his own way of life, he does not really see a meaning to life. Only when it's too late (for his child, Satoko and himself) he realizes there was something to live for. (less)

Community Reviews

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Jeffrey Keeten
Mar 18, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: the-japanese
Yukio Mishima felt the Japanese government needed to return to a system based on the samurai code. He was descended from samarais and believed that this code, advocating complete command of one's body and soul combined with a complete loyalty to the emperor, was necessary for Japan to return to prominence. He formed his own army in 1970 and attempted a coup d'état. With a few friends he overpowered the commandant of the Ichigaya Camp — the Tokyo headquarters of the Eastern Command of Japan's Sel ...more
William1
Mar 30, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Set near Tokyo in 1912. In Spring Snow Kiyoaki Matsugae is sent as a child be raised on the estate of a Count where he learns all the worst habits of a decadent court. He is slothful, he preens in the knowledge of his superior looks. When 18 years of age he is so self-involved—the familiar disaffectedness of many Mishima protagonists—that even when kissing the woman who loves him he thinks only of how he feels. He's an affected asshole who takes a conscious pleasure in cruelty.
This . . . was fur
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وائل المنعم
كان ومازال الجمال هو الرابط المشترك بين كل الإبداعات الفنية الُعظمى، بعض أنواع الجمال يُدرك بالعقل وقد يحتاج إلى تدريب وتكوين خاص وأحياناً خلفية ثقافية، وأنواع أخرى تمس القلب مباشرةً دون إستعداد خاص كما في الموسيقى أو الشعر ونادراً ما توجد في الأدب، وروايتنا من هذه النوادر.
قال كونديرا ما معناه أن أجمل ما يمكن أن يصادف محب الفن او الأدب هو أن يعجب بعمل يخالف توجهه الفني. ثلج الربيع رواية كلاسيكية، تمتلىء بالوصف للطبيعة - وإن كان بشكل تعبيري، إطارها العام قصة حب. وهي عناصر ثلاث لا تجذبني عادةً. إل
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B0nnie
Mar 21, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favourite-books
Mishima, like other great writers, has a way of implanting memories in our heads, echoes of other lives. How this magic happens is a mystery but when it does, you feel somehow denser inside, more solid. Spring Snow left me with that feeling, of having increased my gravity and weight, with the lyrical descriptions, history, characters, ceremonies, letters, political intrigue, birds and emerald rings and emerald snakes, and silk kimonos, and more.

At its heart, this is a doomed love story, about t
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Michael Finocchiaro
It is hard to put words to the beauty and melancholy that Mishima pours into this first of his great tetralogy. The symbolism, the imagery, the characters - everything here is drawn with a fine pencil and eye for detail. The characters reappear in the following books but not as you might expect. This is one of the great monuments of Japanese literature in the 20th C (my other favourite is Soseki's I am a Cat) and it is truly a pleasure to read and savour.
Jr Bacdayan
Sep 03, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A book can be either of two things: a key to open locked doors which lead to unique experiences we have not encountered or are impossible for us to attain; while the other is a mirror to show us who we are or remind us of ourselves and the past we have not forgotten. One stirs excitement, the other nostalgia. This time it took the shape of the latter. The book served as a mirror to me, reminding me of a befuddled young man blind to the workings of his heart, prone to exaggerating the simple nuan ...more
Tristan
Apr 27, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: indispensable
“Oddly enough, living only for one’s emotions, like a flag obedient to the breeze, demands a way of life that makes one balk at the natural course of events, for this implies being altogether subservient to nature. The life of the emotions detests all constraints, whatever their origin, and thus, ironically enough, is apt eventually to fetter its own instinctive sense of freedom.”

- Yukio Mishima, Spring Snow

After finishing this supreme piece of fiction (the first of the tetralogy The Sea of Fer
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[P]
Feb 23, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: bitchin
Has there ever been a stranger novelist than Yukio Mishima? On the one hand, he was a body-building Nationalist, who advocated bushido, the samurai code; he also, as many know, committed seppuku, which is a ritual form of suicide involving disembowelling and beheading. You don’t, it is fair to say, get that kind of thing with Julian Barnes and Karl Ove Knausgaard.

description

On the other hand, Mishima was undeniably a cultured man, who spoke English and dressed in the English fashion; he was a bisexual who
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Bettie☯


Description: Tokyo, 1912. The closed world of the ancient aristocracy is being breached for the first time by outsiders - rich provincial families, a new and powerful political and social elite.

Kiyoaki has been raised among the elegant Ayakura family - members of the waning aristocracy - but he is not one of them. Coming of age, he is caught up in the tensions between old and new, and his feelings for the exquisite, spirited Satoko, observed from the sidelines by his devoted friend Honda. When S
...more
Ryan
Feb 21, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Once you start reading Mishima, and becoming absorbed with his characters, you are caught in a web that resembles the web he reveals his own characters are enmeshed in. His characters are so tragic, yet so ordinary; so privileged, yet so doomed; so foolish, yet so much more introspective than you. Spring Snow was one of the best books I have ever read. Mishima is like a surgeon; the tip of his needle or scalpel so fine, so pointed, that he can isolate the most fleeting, awkward, and yet noble em ...more
Joel Palma
May 08, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: japanese, favorites
Hands down, my favorite Japanese novel to date!!!

I can only but sigh finishing reading this masterpiece by Yukio Mishima. I am much overwhelmed by this beautifully poignant book that will surely tugs the heart of any reader.

So gorgeously written that demands to be read slow (not because one is intimidated to do so but it is such a beauty to relish every word written, I call it the "Mishima magic") and, indeed, Proustian in its rendition- as universal and constant as the waves of the sea, the int
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Hakan
Dec 08, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
bahar karları, japonya’nın yirminci yüzyılını anlatan bereket denizi dörtlemesinin ilk romanı. 1912 yılında başlıyor: 45 yıllık imparator meiji döneminin bittiği, geleneksel değerlere bağlı soylulara karşı yeni bir zengin sınıfının yükseldiği, batılılaşmanın hız kazandığı bir dönem. bu dönemi bir aşk hikayesi etrafında okuyoruz ve fakat herhangi bir tarihi roman okuma deneyiminden farklı bir tarafı var bu okumanın. romanın yazarı mişima’nın batılılaşmaya karşı radikal muhalefet yürüttüğünü ve be ...more
brian
Sep 08, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
the first in mishima's tetralogy and, so far, the best (i'm in the middle of the third). on its own, Spring Snow is easily one of the most tender love stories i've read -- but it cannot be considered on its own: as honda watches a friend reincarnated several times over the span of several novels, it all adds up to even more than the sum of its extraordinary parts. in the USA, this'd play out as gimmick; in japan (shinto, buddhism, etc.) it is the assumption. an exploration of history, the philos ...more
Cem
Apr 05, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Benim için muhteşem bir deneyimdi;Japon kültürü,gençliği,eğitim,aristokrasi,kraliyet gibi konularda yüzeysel de olsa bilgi edindim. Ancak şunu söylemem lazım: Bu bilgiler (yaşayış tarzlarına,eğitime,kültüre dair) olmasa da roman kendinden çok az şey kaybederdi. Öyle duru,öyle akıcı,öyle doğal bir tarz yakalanmış ki,ancak okuyup görülebilir,tarifle olmaz. Zaten istesem de tarif edemem,edebiyat bilirkişisi değilim.Diğer taraftan romanın kendi doğal akışı zaten Japon kültürüne dair ipuçları sunuyor ...more
Maria Thomarey
3,5 ο Μισιμα είναι δύσκολος , είναι Άργος σου σπάει τα νεύρα , αλλά είναι υπέροχος . Ακομα θυμάμαι την αίσθηση του να τον διαβάζω ...... Γενικά η ιαπωνική λογοτεχνία το έχει αυτό . Είναι αργή και τελετουργική σαν μια τελετή τσαγιού , αλλά ταυτόχρονα είναι λες και σου έχουν βάλει μέλι στα δάκτυλά και σου έχει κολλήσει το βιβλίο .... Είναι " ο τρόπος των Σαμουράι" μάλλον .
Deniz Balcı
Başyapıt!!!

Uzun zamandır okurken bu kadar etkilendiğim bir kitap hatırlamıyorum. Yukio Mişima benim için en özel yazarlardan bir tanesi. O yüzden eserleri yavaşça ve üzerinde çok düşünerek okumayı seviyorum. Buna rağmen tekrar okumak için yerinmeyeceğim isimlerin başında geliyor. Kawabata'nın lirizmi Japon Edebiyatının zirvesi gibi lans edilse de; bence Japon Edebiyatının zirvesi Mişima'dır. İlk kitap Bahar Karları'ndan anladığım üzere de, yazarında en iyi işleri olarak gördüğü Bereket Denizi Dö
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Teresa
Jan 24, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The most important -- and used -- word in this book of historical fiction has to be 'elegant' (and its variations). And while the prose style itself is always elegant, the elegance of the ancient aristocracy is not always a good thing, as mostly it seems to be ineffective, even useless, for the situations the characters find themselves in. Those with 'new-money' have the power, but the novelist seems to like them even less than he does the aristocrats. (Even so, all the characters are well-round ...more
Alex
This is a subtle, intelligent, sensitive, perceptive book. But it's also a little boring.

It has some spectacular moments! Tadeshina is a terrific character in the mold of the nurse from Romeo & Juliet, and her makeup is probably the best character in the book. And there's a scene involving Kiyoaki's nipple that's terrifically gay.

This may have been one of those cases where it was the wrong book at the wrong time. I wasn't prepared for something I had to immerse myself in at a Proustian leve
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Meike
Jul 26, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2017, japan
A love story that reflects the struggles within Japanese culture brought about by the westernization at the beginning of the 20th century – Mishima, you’re a genius. On the surface, the content of the book could be summed up like this: The young Kiyoaki, born into a family that has recently come to accumulate considerable wealth, grew up with Satoko, the daughter of an old aristocratic family struggling with monetary problems. It is only when Satoko gets engaged to an Imperial prince that Kiyoak ...more
Matthew
Nov 15, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorite-fiction
This book is, in my opinion, without a doubt, the greatest love story ever told. I don't care what you think about any of the classics, anything you've read before, be it Austen or Shakespeare or the Greeks. The poetic brilliance and tragic self-destruction of love in this book chills me. Even in translation, this piece was the bane of my existence for the length of time I spent reading it - a fair amount for it's length of 400 pages.

Mishima is one of the few authors I've read recently who asto
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Hengtee
Jun 17, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Spring Snow starts at a slow pace. The book takes its time introducing you to the gravity of its characters, and the careful relationships between each, and it's only after building this interweaving world of a precariously balanced harmony, that Mishima spins that world out of control with a simple love affair, and the ensuing chaos.

What I enjoyed most about Spring Snow was following how each character responds to their universe spinning wildly out of control - some by trying desperately to rec
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T4ncr3d1
Jun 03, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: giapponesi
"Non sarebbe magnifico se si potesse saldamente unire l'essenza del proprio animo casto con quella del mondo? Non equivarrebbe forse a stringere tra le mani la chiave segreta del mondo?"

Primo episodio della tetralogia Il mare della fertilità, ultima opera e forse capolavoro di Mishima, questo romanzo, scritto nel 1969, e ambientato all'inizio del secolo, si presenta ben ricco di tutte le tematiche tipiche dell'autore.
Yukio Mishima è noto per i conflitti interiori dalla molteplice natura: oltre a
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Mohamed Omran
Aug 24, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
اراهن ان من يقرأ تلك الروايه سيجد بصره وسمعه وشمه وكل حواسه السبعه تداخلت في الكلمات ووصف الجمال واعتقد
كان ومازال الجمال هو الرابط المشترك بين كل الإبداعات الفنية الُعظمى، بعض أنواع الجمال يُدرك بالعقل وقد يحتاج إلى تدريب وتكوين خاص وأحياناً خلفية ثقافية، وأنواع أخرى تمس القلب مباشرةً دون إستعداد خاص كما في الموسيقى أو الشعر ونادراً ما توجد في الأدب، وروايتنا من هذه النوادر.
قال كونديرا ما معناه أن أجمل ما يمكن أن يصادف محب الفن او الأدب هو أن يعجب بعمل يخالف توجهه الفني. ثلج الربيع رواية كلاسيك
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K.D. Absolutely
Mar 24, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to K.D. by: 501 Must Read Books; 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die (20
Shelves: 501
A story of young tragic love. If you strip the plot to its barest, two young children grew up together. The girl was 2 years older. At 21, she showed affection to the boy but the boy was immature enough to brush it off. At that age and time in Japan, 21 was already old so her parents arranged her to be married to an Imperial prince. After she was betrothed, the boy changed his mind, chased the girl, got her pregnant. Again, during that time in Japan, it was a mortal sin to commit such act to the ...more
Steven
"The only thing that seemed valid to him was to live for the emotions - gratuitous and unstable, dying only to quicken again, dwindling and flaring without direction or purpose." (15)
I approached Mishima at perhaps an unusual angle, reading first his novel Confessions of a Mask, followed by a collection of his Nō Plays and then his stories. I now thought it was time to read Spring Snow, the first book in his The Sea of Fertility tetralogy (upon completion of which, on 25 November, 1970, Mishima
...more
Russell
Sep 04, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The blending of Buddhist philosophy, reincarnation theory, beautiful prose descriptors of the environment that surrounds these characters, as well as an engrossing storyline that effectively examines a changing Japanese society (Traditional vs Westernisation) really just hits my sweet spot. Loved it. Runaway Horses is in the mail. For now, back the Dying Grass..
ايمان
من يريد قراءة ثلج الربيع فليستعد لقراءة رباعية الخصب كلها لتتضح له فلسفة ميشيما
لو اغفل ميشيما الاطالة و الاطناب لأخد خمس نجوم و المستفيد الأول في هذه الرواية الطبيعة بلا أدنى شك اخذت نصف الورق من الوصف الدقيق حتى لتتخيل اوراق الشجر يدغدغ وجنتيك.
ياسمين ثابت

description

اعتقد ان الروايات تشبه في جمالها جمال النساء بمختلف اشكاله
رواية تجدها صارخة الجمال لكن خاوية بداخلها
بدون جوهر للفكرة
ورواية جمالها يجذبك من اول لحظة لاخر لحظة
وهناك نوع من جمال النساء اجده في الروايات ايضا وهو ذلك الجمال الذي يظهر بالوقت
بالتركيز
المرأة الغير ملحوظة والتي لو ركزت فيها لادركت قيمة جمالها
هذا هو حال رواية ثلج الربيع

description

ثلج الربيع الجزء الاول من رباعية ضخمة للكاتب الياباني يوكيو ميشيما جزءها الثاني الجياد الهاربة ثم معبد الفجر ثم سقوط الملاك كلهم بنفس الترجمة وكلهم من المفترض انهم يرتبطون ب
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Jeremy
May 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is much more lush and descriptive than the other Mishima I've read. The dark, intense psychology that he usually examines is, in Spring Snow, much more rooted in lush, sensual descriptions of Matsuge and Honda's external world. An old war photograph, a cloth falling off of a table, the way light plays over the face of a waterfall, etc, Mishima is able to forge rich emotional states around such images and to make them react and magnify each other.

Almost every page in this book has some inte
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Florencia
Jan 18, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Even when we're with someone we love, we're foolish enough to think of her body and soul as being separate. To stand before the person we love is not the same as loving her true self, for we are only apt to regard her physical beauty as the indispensable mode of her existence. When time and space intervene, it is possible to be deceived by both, but on the other hand, it is equally possible to draw twice as close to her real self.

Delectable writing, disturbing characters; what a mixture.
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  • Some Prefer Nettles
  • The Three-Cornered World
  • The Setting Sun
  • First Snow on Fuji
  • The Silent Cry
  • The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories
  • Tales of Moonlight and Rain
  • Rashōmon and Seventeen Other Stories
  • Masks
  • Black Rain
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Yukio Mishima (三島 由紀夫) is the pen name of Kimitake Hiraoka (平岡 公威) who was a Japanese author, poet and playwright, famous for both his highly notable post-war writings and the circumstances of his ritual suicide by seppuku.

Mishima wrote 40 novels, 18 plays, 20 books of short stories, and at least 20 books of essays, one libretto, as well as one film. A large portion of this oeuvre comprises books
...more
More about Yukio Mishima...

Other Books in the Series

The Sea of Fertility (4 books)
  • Runaway Horses
  • The Temple of Dawn
  • The Decay of the Angel

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“Dreams, memories, the sacred--they are all alike in that they are beyond our grasp. Once we are even marginally separated from what we can touch, the object is sanctified; it acquires the beauty of the unattainable, the quality of the miraculous. Everything, really, has this quality of sacredness, but we can desecrate it at a touch. How strange man is! His touch defiles and yet he contains the source of miracles.” 258 likes
“Time is what matters. As time goes by, you and I will be carried inexorably into the mainstream of our period, even though we’re unaware of what it is. And later, when they say that young men in the early Taisho era thought, dressed, talked, in such and such a way, they’ll be talking about you and me. We’ll all be lumped together…. In a few decades, people will see you and the people you despise as one and the same, a single entity.” 47 likes
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