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For The Common Good: Redirecting the Economy toward Community, the Environment, and a Sustainable Future
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For The Common Good: Redirecting the Economy toward Community, the Environment, and a Sustainable Future

4.21  ·  Rating details ·  152 ratings  ·  13 reviews
Winner of the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order 1992, Named New Options Best Political Book

Economist Herman Daly and theologian John Cobb, Jr., demonstrate how conventional economics and a growth-oriented industrial economy have led us to the brink of environmental disaster, and show the possibility of a different future.

Named as one of the Top 50 Sustainabi
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Paperback, 544 pages
Published April 1st 1994 by Beacon Press (first published December 1st 1993)
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Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership
One of Cambridge Sustainability's Top 50 Books for Sustainability, as voted for by our alumni network of over 3,000 senior leaders from around the world. To find out more, click here.

For the Common Good is a wide-ranging critique of contemporary economic policies, covering international trade, population, land use, agriculture, industry, labour, taxation and national security. Although it sets out to challenge conventional economics, it is written in an accessible style and largely avoids speaki
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The Capital Institute
Daly provides a ‘blueprint’ for a decentralized economy built around small communities and makes specific proposals, including a tax on industrial polluters, worker participation in management and ownership, reduced military spending and a more self-sufficient national economy, with a lower volume of imports. Intended mainly for economists, the book essentially deconstructs neoclassical economic theory and creates a more ‘holistic’ model that pulls together the idea of the individual, the commun ...more
Franklin
Aug 14, 2008 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: environment
I read this as part of an environmentalist reading group started by some people in Terra, a Chicago organization. I hated this book because it's the standard kind of outline of how we can fix the economy by making it more moral. See my comments on Bill McKibben's Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future.
Utkarsha Singh
Jun 07, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It is funny that academicians are ready to make bizzare unreal assumptions to prove their mathematical models correct. They do not care whether these assumptions are driving the model and its predictions far away from real world situations. It is funnier to see policy makers then refer to such models to bring out policies that would govern a nation. The book points out how with advancement of technology and the market humans have alienated themselves from the bigger picture and are targeting sho ...more
Laura Brose
Aug 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book is huge, because it covers darn near everything wrong with society and economy in recent history. But as the old man without a seat in an Ancient Greek amphitheater said, "you young Athenians know what is right, but it takes a Spartan to do it".
Oliver Moldenhauer
This book influenced me a lot.
Matt Barlow
Unfortunately, I had to put this one down. While I was very excited to read this book based on it's premise, the writing was just too academic for someone like myself with little understanding of economics.
Mark
Jan 15, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2013
I am on page 116
Josh Volk
Jul 29, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I read the first version of this. Great explanations of economics, what economist mean when they say things, and how people misinterpret. Good ideas on how to change things as well.
Boghall
An important and necessary, but not perhaps the most gripping book.
Stephen Palmer
Feb 11, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Excellent overview of the economic way forward.
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Herman Daly is an American ecological economist and professor at the School of Public Policy of University of Maryland, College Park in the United States. He was Senior Economist in the Environment Department of the World Bank, where he helped to develop policy guidelines related to sustainable development. While there, he was engaged in environmental operations work in Latin America. He is closel ...more

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“Even if we could grow our way out of the crisis and delay the inevitable and painful reconciliation of virtual and real wealth, there is the question of whether this would be a wise thing to do. Marginal costs of additional growth in rich countries, such as global warming, biodiversity loss and roadways choked with cars, now likely exceed marginal benefits of a little extra consumption. The end result is that promoting further economic growth makes us poorer, not richer.” 13 likes
“If nonsatiety were the natural state of human nature then aggressive want-stimulating advertising would not be necessary, nor would the barrage of novelty aimed at promoting dissatisfaction with last year's model. The system attempts to remake people to fit its own presuppositions. If people's wants are not naturally insatiable we must make them so, in order to keep the system going.” 10 likes
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