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Who Got Einstein's Office? Eccentricity and Genius at the Institute for Advanced Study
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Who Got Einstein's Office? Eccentricity and Genius at the Institute for Advanced Study

4.01  ·  Rating details ·  197 ratings  ·  7 reviews
It was home to Einstein in decline, the place where Kurt Göedel starved himself in paranoid delusion, and where J. Robert Oppenheimer rode out his political persecution in the Director's mansion. It is the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey; at one time or another, home to fourteen Nobel laureates, most of the great physicists and mathematicians of the m ...more
Paperback, 336 pages
Published January 22nd 1988 by Basic Books (first published October 1st 1987)
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4.01  · 
Rating details
 ·  197 ratings  ·  7 reviews


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Alejandro
Apr 19, 2012 rated it really liked it
Rare specimen in science divulgation literature, as it provides insight not only in the personal and intellectual characters of past and present and the future of science, but also in the organizational challenges that research institutes face. Its final analysis on scientific truth and theories of knowledge is a masterpiece in its style. A must-read if you are interested in the future of science and the most advanced theories, but also if you would like to know why the hell does scientific deve ...more
Ming Chyang Lim
Jul 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing
A very interesting and good book.
Nicholas Lai
Mar 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
For a subject in danger of being reduced to a timeline of science in the 20th century, Ed Regis livens up the history of the Institute for Advanced Studies with intimate portraits of the institution's venerated faculty (spanning from Gödel's paranoia over hospital meals to Von Neumann's exceptional fondness for parties!) and a discussion of Platonic philosophy and it's relationship to scientific discovery.
Steve
Feb 04, 2008 rated it really liked it
THe Institute for Advanced Studies is a very interesting yet obscure neighbor to better known cousin Princeton University. Extremely well funded playground for exceptional minds best known for hosting Einstein (after he was a star) it describes the politics of science and the value of a purely theoretical research center.
It's fun for those who enjoy reading about the eccentric and brilliant minds that shape our realities while living outside ours.
Simon Dobson
May 08, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: bonanza
Very enjoyable mixture of history, biography, and science, not to mention some great observations on the nature of research and the divisions between experimentalists and theorists.
Mills College Library
507.20974 R3371 1988
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Ed Regis holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from New York University and taught for many years at Howard University. He is now a full-time science writer, contributing to Scientific American, Harper's Magazine, Wired, Discover, and The New York Times, among other periodicals.