Michael de Larrabeiti





Michael de Larrabeiti


Born
in Lambeth, London, The United Kingdom
August 18, 1934

Died
April 18, 2008

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Michael de Larrabeiti was an English novelist and travel writer. He is best known for writing The Borrible Trilogy, which has been cited as an influence by writers in the New Weird movement.

Average rating: 4.13 · 1,337 ratings · 98 reviews · 22 distinct works · Similar authors
The Borribles (The Borrible...

4.04 avg rating — 405 ratings — published 1976 — 17 editions
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The Borrible Trilogy (The B...

4.25 avg rating — 197 ratings — published 2002 — 4 editions
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The Borribles Go For Broke ...

4.22 avg rating — 193 ratings — published 1981 — 12 editions
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Across the Dark Metropolis ...

4.08 avg rating — 139 ratings — published 1981 — 8 editions
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The Provençal Tales

4.30 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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Journal of a Sad Hermaphrodite

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings3 editions
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The Borribles: Book 1

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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The Borribles Go For Broke:...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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French Leave: A Love Affair...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2003
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Across the Dark Metropolis:...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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More books by Michael de Larrabeiti…
The Borribles The Borribles Go For Broke Across the Dark Metropolis
The Borrible Trilogy (3 books)
by
4.13 avg rating — 934 ratings

“All right," said Spiff. "Now this is what I say, anyone who thinks they've got a better plan can say so afterwards.”
Michael de Larrabeiti, The Borribles Go For Broke

“Normal kids are turned into Borribles very slowly, almost without being aware of it; but one day they wake up and there it is. It doesn't matter where they come from as long as they have what is called a “bad start.” A child disappears from a school and the word goes round that he was “unmanageable”; the chances are he is off managing by himself. Sometimes it's given out that a kid down the street has been “put into care” because whenever he got home from school the house was empty; no doubt he's been Borribled and is caring for himself someplace. One day a shout might be heard in a supermarket and a kid with the goods on him is hoisted out by a store-detective. If that kid gets away he'll become a Borrible and make sure he isn't caught again. Being caught is the end for a Borrible.

So Borribles are outcasts but unlike most outcasts they enjoy themselves and wouldn't be anything else. They delight in feeling independent and free and it is this feeling that is most important to them. Consequently they have no real leaders, though someone may pop into prominence from time to time, perhaps because he has had a good idea and wants to carry it through. They manage without authority and they get on well enough together, though like everybody, they quarrel.”
Michael de Larrabeiti, The Borribles

“It's impossible to lose that which does not belong to you.”
Michael de Larrabeiti, The Borribles

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