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Love Creeps

3.31 of 5 stars 3.31  ·  rating details  ·  319 ratings  ·  51 reviews
At the age of thirty-two, Lynn Gallagher, a successful Manhattan gallery owner, suddenly finds herself wanting nothing. She has never before wanted nothing, and she misses wanting. No one around her wants nothing. She becomes envious of everyone who wants -- especially her stalker, Alan Morton, who wants her very badly. Because she envies Alan, Lynn decides to copy him. An ...more
Paperback, 304 pages
Published May 30th 2006 by St. Martin's Griffin (first published 2004)
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Lolly K Dandeneau
Here is the thing, I first read Vapor by Filipacchi before I ever read Love Creeps or Nude Men. It joined my favorite book list, and one of the reasons is Amanda has unique stories. You can say anything you want, but you can't claim you have read the same thing somewhere else. In Love Creeps you have a stalker who adores a woman that decides, in order to revive feeling and passion in her own indifferent heart, to stalk someone else. Of course, her stalker gets a front row to her stalking, as he ...more
Laura Lombardo
this was an impulse buy having never heard of it prior - made me laugh out loud continually throughout! i keep trying to tell my friends to read it but no one has yet to borrow it from me - but i would highly recommend it.
Blake Fraina
Love Creeps is a social satire that cleverly skewers everything from urban romance in the twenty-first century to obsessive-compulsive disorder, from twelve-step programs and the culture of victimhood to the curious inner-workings of social currency.

At the outset of the story, schlubby CPA Alan has been regularly stalking willowy NYC art dealer Lynn. Lynn has lost her zest for life and decides to imitate Alan’s ardent stalking behavior to reawaken her own desire. At random, she chooses Roland, a
Betsy Robinson
Ingenious story, told almost like a koan or parable, populated by Keystone-Kop-like stalkers and stalkees, about how we only want what we can't have. Hence, the difficulties—death of desire—that arise when we (our ego self) have no rejection. Here's a snippet; Patricia, a gallery assistant, is talking to her boss, Lynn:
. . . Patricia asked, "But why would your desire be awakened by Roland not wanting you? Hasn't anyone not wanted you before?"

"Not in a while. Or at least not that I noticed. I hav
I received a free copy of this novel through Goodreads giveaways

This book is hilarious, absurd, and surreal. I snorted, rolled my eyes, laughed out loud, groaned, and I absolutely did not want to put it down; in fact, I barely did, except to sleep. I also never once predicted what would happen next, which is always a real joy.

As with most books I receive for free, I went into this blind; I didn't read any reviews, and I skipped the back cover summary as well. (I would read all books this way, if
Probably my favorite of the three titles I have read from Filipacci’s pen, this love farce presents a nice slice of the characterization that is so typically hers. Her characters are over-the-top, obsessive and neurotic, with a heavy dose of navel-gazing involved in their often convoluted reasoning. It is not important, nor is it even necessary, to find empathy with or like her characters: but readers will find little nuggets of insight into behavior and quirks that are familiar in friends, fami ...more
Three singles living in New York City search for meaning and love. Desire first comes in the form of stalking, and this sets off an insane spiral of interest and disinterest that waxes and wanes between the three. Hilarity ensures.

Filipacchi is laugh-out-loud funny and is gaspingly outrageous. The characters all have silly modern problems that walk the line between frivilous and profound. Lynn, for example, believes she has a mental health issue - she doesn't want anything. Everyone she knows wa
Anne-Gigi  Chan
Lynn Gallagher, a successful Manhattan gallery owner, was depressed that she had lost her desire for anything. She was jealous of everyone else who wanted something, so much so that she decided to copy her stalker, Alan Morton, who wanted her very badly. Lynn started to stalk Roland Dupont, who had some strange behavior of his own.

Alan was perturbed by the fact that Lynn was now a stalker, so he befriended Roland to find out why Lynn preferred Roland to himself. Alan then proposed a plan: if Ro
I'm still not sure if I liked this one or not. It was really, seriously weird, which I dig, but the characters were despicable and narcissistic, which is annoying. In fact, imagine Seinfeld casted with 4 Patrick Batemans as main characters. Which is to say, ultimately, I'm ambivalent about recommending this book to, read at your own risk.
Kiara Schlesinger
I love Amanda Filipacchi. Unique and absurd, I laughed out loud more than once
a really silly book, but had some good liners on how to look at life.
Liz Cee
A weird little book with plenty of dark humour. Some will not find the subject of stalking funny - so I'm letting you know in advance not to pick it up.

I found it to be a good commentary on those who feel entitled. This group of largely unlikable characters certainly think the world owes them. They are well educated, privileged and good looking, with great careers, however they are unfulfilled and go to bizarre lengths to meet this need. The book goes off in a few strange detours but it was quit
May 14, 2007 Reza rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: an Amanda Fillapachi fan
Shelves: read-in-2007
Entertaining. Amanda Fillapachi cracks me up.
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Nancy Rossman
The beginning and premise of this quirky comedy is filled with irony, satire, snappy dialogue and humor. I laughed out loud. And, I would give this author another try. My issue with the novel is that it loses its appeal by length. With a hundred pages to go I started drifting and just wanting it to be over. It became an ordeal to finish. Too much of what had been funny was repeated and then ... not so much. Like telling a really funny joke again, right after you heard it. Had it been short the t ...more
Funny. Dark. Unique.
MISSING - Hanan's utter desire to read. If found, feel free to douse Hanan with it. Reward: Aforementioned person promises to not stalk you after the ordeal.

A rather uneloquent (why isn't this a word again?) missing poster finally peeled off today thanks to Love Creeps. Damn, I owe you one Filipacchi! THIS WAS SO GOOD. My reconciliation with books doesn't necessarily mean I have reconciled with my vocabulary so please excuse this as i'm at a literal loss for words, a consistent nag ever sinc
This book has a comically amusing plot, but many scenes in this book feel like filler. I appreciated the change of direction of the character’s obsessions (I’m not spoiling anything, not really anyways), and the interconnectedness of the characters lives despite the fact their interactions seem staged and plastic. This book is superficially charming, with a lead (Lynn) who is entertaining to watch even though she is hard to empathize with. I did want to see where the story lead the various chara ...more
Lynn, a Manhattan art gallery owner, has a stalker, Alan. But he's the least of her problems. Far worse is the awareness that she has lost her desire. Nothing in life interests her any more and her gallery walls are empty. Her only desire is to desire - which frankly does not count. Galvanized by an off-hand comment from her assistant, she decides to find a person of her very own to stalk and plumps for the blandly handsome Roland. Alan is perturbed to find his beloved stalk-ee following another ...more
I found Amanda Filipacchi's books very amusing 10 years ago. I hadn't read this one before and mostly found it annoying. . . . stalkers stalking each other, no very appealing characters. . . . . maybe it was supposed to be satire, but I didn't find it very amusing or entertaining. Now I want to go back and read her previous novels and see if I still like them.
Ryli Krystyne
I love Amanda Filipacchi! This one was unlike the feel of Vapor and the Unfortunate Importance of Beauty-but still her unique style. I liked all of the characters and could identify with their emotions throughout the story. I was undecided of Alan at the beginning, but when the narration started to follow his thoughts, he became my favorite! So much to take away from this book. Bravo!
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Colton Lacy
Filipacchi's desensitized love-based farce _Love Creeps_ is sincerely enjoyable due to its double-entendres, puns, and other unique word choices that act as a backdrop for an incredibly whimsical subject matter. Her double citizenship is fashioned into her work to add an interesting perspective. Filipacchi ridicules humankind's limited perspective. Her third-person omniscient narrator emulates a god, which adds to the irony of the plot. However, her humor is not always the most lucid and might n ...more
Christopher Roberts
Filipacchi's third novel does not match her previous two. The book is amazing all the same. Like her two previous novels Filipacshi opens with a comic premise that would be enough for many writers. Then she follows that premise through to the most ludicrous extremes, finds many unexpected and twisted ways to take it and makes you glad that you came along for the ride. This book deals with the themes of desire, obsession and romanticism. Toward the end she begins to run out of steam, though she d ...more
There are only a few characters in this book, and I found myself interested or horrified by them in turn. The gallery owner who is bored with her life, the French man she stalks to find interest in her life, or her stalker the accountant. (With a few supporting characters, one of whom ends up being more interesting than the characters themselves.) They're all caricatures of themselves, but there is some depth to each. Not much, but some.
This is definitely a fluffy fun beach read sort of book, b
stupid. thought it might be a cute and funny quick read.stupid
I read this over Christmas vacation with my family. I thought it was great and read some of it out loud to my parents in the car. My dad thought it was drivel and told me he couldn't stand to listen anymore. I think my mom liked it. So did my aunt Patricia, who asked if she could borrow it (I gave her a copy for Christmas the next year).

From what I understand, this is the author's first book, so I'm hoping she writes another one soon... Or maybe she already has? Anyway, there are a lot of fun q
Really maybe more like 2.75. It's fine, but just.
Matt Evans
This was my introduction to Filipacchi, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Very funny, very original story of three people stalking each other, interchangeably (i.e., the stalker becomes the stalk-ee). I read this a few years back, but I still remember the one scene where a murderer's victim, as he's dying from being poisoned, turns to the murder and says, as if surprised, "You're a bad man." That struck me as uproariously funny the first time I read it, and it still kind of makes me chuckle.
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Amanda Filipacchi is the author of three previous novels, Nude Men, Vapor, and, most recently, Love Creeps. Her writing has appeared in Best American Humor and elsewhere. She lives in New York.
More about Amanda Filipacchi...
The Unfortunate Importance of Beauty: A Novel Nude Men Vapor La dichosa importancia de la belleza la regrettable importance de la beauté

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