Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies” as Want to Read:
Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies

by
4.16  ·  Rating details ·  142 ratings  ·  8 reviews
Stuart Hall's work has been central to the formation and development of cultural studies as an international discipline. Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies is an invaluable collection of writings by and about Stuart Hall. The book provides a representative selection of Hall's enormously influential writings on cultural studies and its concerns: the relati ...more
Paperback, 522 pages
Published 1996 by Routledge
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Stuart Hall, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Stuart Hall

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 4.16  · 
Rating details
 ·  142 ratings  ·  8 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies
Trevor
Dec 12, 2015 rated it it was amazing
At the start of the year I had to do my ‘exit’ presentation at Summer School for PhD students. It’s a requirement that you do some sort of presentation on your research and I thought I would get it over with – not because I was all that close to ‘exiting’, although I should finish soon-ish, I hope. Anyway, there was an academic in the audience and he said a couple of things that got under my skin. The first was that my results were mostly banal. Always nice to know, obviously. Not that I mind al ...more
Andrea
Feb 19, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Stuart Hall died as I was in the middle of reading this, which made it so poignant even as I was thinking to myself just how good this book was as a totality and how much I loved him. Like many edited collections it had pieces that I loved and pieces that I didn’t, but even those that I didn’t find so useful still worked brilliantly to give me a solid sense of the international field of Cultural Studies from its early beginnings through the 1990s. That’s no small task given the way that it has c ...more
Jacob
Nov 05, 2020 rated it it was amazing
I was invited by a dear friend of mine to join in a mini.. ah.. club, of sorts. The main goal of said club? Study the work of Stuart Hall and the other 'founders' (a term of which said founders would probably loathe) of Cultural Studies. We accidentally discovered his work while suffering from shared existential crises regarding how to combine our love of academic theories with pragmatic realistic political work - simultaneously critiquing intellectuals who don't leave the ivory tower, while bel ...more
Laura Howard
a doozy
Tiffany
Oct 13, 2016 rated it really liked it
Unfortunately I didn't have the pleasure of reading the whole book, only a couple of chapters for my sociology course. However, Stuart Hall writes about identity in such a way it is easy to understand even for those who are not interested in the field of sociology.

Very enlightening in terms of how it is in the UK and I look forward to reading the whole book at some stage.
...more
Bradley
Jan 12, 2009 rated it really liked it
In my opinion Stuart Hall is the premiere English Cultural Theorist in the last thirty years, and his work is amazingly accessible. I've used his work to teach undergraduates about cultural theory and they ate it up! To think that in England intellectuals are respected to the point where Hall actually hosted the British version of Politically Incorrect. Take that Bill Maher! ...more
John
Oct 14, 2010 rated it liked it
A collection of essays by and about the work of Hall, largely mapping the trajectory of cultural studies as a discipline, including its wrestling with issues of Marx, postmodernism, race, gender, and media studies. There are several gems, but together the book can be overwhelming and repetitive.
Jen
Apr 09, 2010 added it
Fundamental book in the field of Cultural Studies
Jennifer
rated it it was amazing
Jan 23, 2012
Sarah Katende
rated it it was amazing
Jan 22, 2017
El
rated it it was amazing
Dec 17, 2012
Elly Tams
rated it it was amazing
Mar 14, 2012
Thea
rated it it was amazing
Jan 25, 2009
Jesse
rated it really liked it
Oct 18, 2008
Ayana
rated it it was amazing
Aug 19, 2012
John
rated it really liked it
Feb 07, 2015
Luqman Lee
rated it really liked it
Feb 17, 2015
Julie
rated it really liked it
Feb 04, 2009
Cagri
rated it it was amazing
Mar 30, 2008
Kara Gonzales
rated it it was amazing
Jan 01, 2019
Terrion
rated it really liked it
Oct 07, 2011
Cheraine Donalea Scott
rated it really liked it
Jun 19, 2015
Zuzanna
rated it really liked it
Dec 09, 2011
I
rated it liked it
Sep 20, 2008
Tim Haslett
rated it it was amazing
Feb 20, 2008
Zach
rated it really liked it
May 11, 2013
Fernanda
rated it really liked it
Sep 25, 2014
Katie
rated it really liked it
May 01, 2009
Chelsea
rated it it was amazing
Apr 13, 2011
Daniel
rated it really liked it
May 27, 2013
« previous 1 3 4 5 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • Introducing Judaism
  • Postmodernism: A Very Short Introduction
  • Leaves of Grass
  • Marx: A Very Short Introduction
  • The Conscience of a Conservative
  • The Power of Myth
  • The Gay Science
  • Golda
  • Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction
  • Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie
  • Screwjack
  • Lillian and Kokomis: The Spirit of Dance
  • Legends of Vancouver
  • Consider This: Moments in My Writing Life After Which Everything Was Different
  • Eat a Peach
  • Lowside of the Road: A Life of Tom Waits
  • The Art of the Novel
  • Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within
See similar books…
4 followers
David Morley is Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London.

News & Interviews

What will you do when it's your turn to pick your book club's next read? Well, this is what you won't do: panic. Why not? Because we've dug...
40 likes · 9 comments