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No Respect: Intellectuals and Popular Culture

3.69  ·  Rating details ·  32 ratings  ·  2 reviews
The intellectual and the popular: Irving Howe and John Waters, Susan Sontag and Ethel Rosenberg, Dwight MacDonald and Bill Cosby, Amiri Baraka and Mick Jagger, Andrea Dworkin and Grace Jones, Andy Warhol and Lenny Bruce. All feature in Andrew Ross's lively history and critique of modern American culture. Andrew Ross examines how and why the cultural authority of modern int ...more
Paperback, 288 pages
Published July 1st 1989 by Routledge
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3.69  · 
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Scott Moore
May 03, 2008 rated it really liked it
A theoretical introduction to camp (and its valence in queer communities), and a significant examination of popular culture and "taste". Ross, far too predictably, focuses a bit too much on white, upper/middle class gay men, but fortunately the book's usefulness extends beyond these limitations.
Jeff
Jan 05, 2011 rated it liked it
Andrew Ross's book on intellectuals and popular culture is very messy. An example of a book with lots of good ideas, and haphazard scholarship, so ultimately a settler-scholar can feel a little put-out by the pioneer's having clear-cut the town before the environmental impact was measured. And Ross may not like the analogy, but then I don't think his book is going to have converted many to the cosmopolitan magistracy of its author's arguments. I see it rather as the 1989-published footnote to Jo ...more
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Andrew Ross is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University, and a social activist. A contributor to The Nation, the Village Voice, New York Times, and Artforum, he is the author of many books, including, most recently, Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City and Nice Work if You Can Get It: Life and Labor in Precarious Times.